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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 08:13 AM
Christine
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

We have a glass topped range, so the extension office says I shouldn't use
it for my water bath canners. So I purchased a type of outside cook
stove/burner that runs off propane which is (again according to the
extension office) a good choice. Last year my girlfriends were teasing me
suggesting I just try the 'inversion method' listed in the sure-jell pectin
recipes.

Two weeks ago I made several batches of strawberry jam. Rather than haul my
jams outside to boil them in the driveway, I admit I was lazy and decided to
try the 'inversion method' listed in the pectin recipe. Well, ten days
later I found little bits of mold in the headspace of twelve jars of
low-sugar strawberry jam. The jars and lids were sterilized, the jam was
boiled properly, and all the jars were sealed correctly. Three days before
I found the moldy jam, I had made more strawberry jam, using the inversion
method which seemed fine, but again it was only 3 days old. The spots of
mold were only on the surface, and most of them were little bits less than
1/4 inch in size.

I now realize that:

1. The inversion method stinks
2. Low sugar and the inversion method is an especially bad combination.

I promise to never do it again, so please be kind in your responses.

The problem is this--there were 24 jars of perfect jam without mold--most of
which was only 3 days old. They were sealed and had no signs of trouble
when opened. I emptied them into a stock pot in batches of 8 cups, added
some pectin and reboiled and then processed in a water bath (for 15 minutes
instead of the suggested 10). At the risk of the food police breaking into
my pantry and running off with my jams, how bad of an idea was this? Is
this safe?

If I emptied out the top half of the moldy jam (it was only 10 days old) and
reboiled and processed the bottom half of the jam, is having that on an
English muffin considered living on the edge?

I know people used to scrape off and eat moldy jam, but the extension office
recommended I throw away every jar--even the ones with no signs of trouble,
and even the three day old jam--just to be 'safe.' Of course, she also
sounded like the type that actually sterilized her children's binkies so I
am not sure what to think.

Can I get your thoughts?

Thank you so much, and, as God as my witness, I will never inversion again!

Christine



Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 12:22 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

In article , "Christine"
wrote:

We have a glass topped range, so the extension office says I
shouldn't use it for my water bath canners. So I purchased a type of
outside cook stove/burner that runs off propane which is (again
according to the extension office) a good choice. Last year my
girlfriends were teasing me suggesting I just try the 'inversion
method' listed in the sure-jell pectin recipes.

Two weeks ago I made several batches of strawberry jam. Rather than
haul my jams outside to boil them in the driveway, I admit I was lazy
and decided to try the 'inversion method' listed in the pectin
recipe. Well, ten days later I found little bits of mold in the
headspace of twelve jars of low-sugar strawberry jam. The jars and
lids were sterilized, the jam was boiled properly, and all the jars
were sealed correctly. Three days before I found the moldy jam, I
had made more strawberry jam, using the inversion method which seemed
fine, but again it was only 3 days old. The spots of mold were only
on the surface, and most of them were little bits less than 1/4 inch
in size.

I now realize that:

1. The inversion method stinks
2. Low sugar and the inversion method is an especially bad
combination.



I promise to never do it again, so please be kind in your responses.


We're always kind. :-) Sometimes we shake our heads in the privacy of
our own homes, but we're always kind. "-)

Out of curiosity I checked the SJ web site -- in their full instructions
there, they use a boiling water bath to process the jams after sealing.
The inversion method for sealing is mentioned in a separate link and
clearly as an aside. Are they still recommending the inversion method
as a first choice on paper?

Bigger hmmmmmm: These are their instructions for jar prep:
"BRING boiling-water canner, half full with water, to simmer. Wash jars
and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling
water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water
until ready to use. Drain well before filling. "

What we preach here is that any jar that's not going to be either
waterbath or pressure processed for at least 10 minutes needs to have
been subjected to a 10-minute boiling water sterilization before filling.

I hope you'll ring them up and tell them of your experience.


The problem is this--there were 24 jars of perfect jam without
mold--most of which was only 3 days old. They were sealed and had no
signs of trouble when opened. I emptied them into a stock pot in
batches of 8 cups, added some pectin and reboiled and then processed
in a water bath (for 15 minutes instead of the suggested 10). At the
risk of the food police breaking into my pantry and running off with
my jams, how bad of an idea was this?


It's not the worse idea I've ever heard. :-)

Is this safe?

Most likely. I think the official remake instructions involve the
addition of some sugar with the pectin, though.

If I emptied out the top half of the moldy jam (it was only 10 days
old) and reboiled and processed the bottom half of the jam, is having
that on an English muffin considered living on the edge?


Officially? Probably. Practically? Probably not but I'd probably
chuck it if I'd had any thought of giving it as a gift. Keeping it
refrigerated would be a must, though. And I wouldn't be giving it as a
gift.

I know people used to scrape off and eat moldy jam, but the extension
office recommended I throw away every jar--even the ones with no
signs of trouble, and even the three day old jam--just to be 'safe.'
Of course, she also sounded like the type that actually sterilized
her children's binkies so I am not sure what to think.


She's erring on the side of safety and the doctrine of CYA so that if
you get sick and die and from your hospital bed announce that "I checked
with the University's extension office and they said it was ok" your
survivors won't sue for the big bucks.

Can I get your thoughts?


Well, sure. That's why we're here.

You've done me a public service with your post Christine. Last
Wednesday I posted a one-liner with the the subject line: I took a
preserving class last night. I didn't go into any details then. I'll
go into some now.

The instructor did a demo of pepper jelly with a recipe using Certo
liquid pectin. When we arrived in the classroom, she had half-pint jars
lined up and filled with warm water and a small saucepan with lids in it
on the stove over a low flame. Ninety minutes later, when she was ready
to fill the jars (the recipe did NOT take that long to do, let me hasten
to add; she spent an hour talking about other stuff before she got to
cooking), she emptied the water from each and dried the inside with a
dish towel. And she filled the jars and sealed them and used the
inversion method because "this is what Certo recommends." She mentioned
the USDA's recommended method for water bath processing but said that
that's hot, takes more time, and this is easier.

OK. One can hardly argue that the inversion is not a simpler thing to
do at the outset -- but look at what it got YOU: Mold in your product,
anxiety and angst, and a re-do that will probably render your jam safe
for your consumption.

None of which you'd have if the jars had been processed properly in the
first place. Which method ends up to have taken more of your time?

I've never thought the argument about waterbath processing being so hot
held a lot of water -- certainly not for processing sweet spreads. If
the pot's already been boiling for 10 minutes, what's another 5 or 10
minutes with filled jars?

Thank you so much, and, as God as my witness, I will never inversion
again!
Christine


O My Child, go in peace and sin no more. I'll put in a good word with
the Father Inquisitor and Saint Vinaigrette.
-Barb
Mother Superior, Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of
Jella
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 02:34 PM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

Christine wrote:
We have a glass topped range, so the extension office says I shouldn't use
it for my water bath canners. So I purchased a type of outside cook
stove/burner that runs off propane which is (again according to the
extension office) a good choice. Last year my girlfriends were teasing me
suggesting I just try the 'inversion method' listed in the sure-jell pectin
recipes.

Two weeks ago I made several batches of strawberry jam. Rather than haul my
jams outside to boil them in the driveway, I admit I was lazy and decided to
try the 'inversion method' listed in the pectin recipe. Well, ten days
later I found little bits of mold in the headspace of twelve jars of
low-sugar strawberry jam. The jars and lids were sterilized, the jam was
boiled properly, and all the jars were sealed correctly. Three days before
I found the moldy jam, I had made more strawberry jam, using the inversion
method which seemed fine, but again it was only 3 days old. The spots of
mold were only on the surface, and most of them were little bits less than
1/4 inch in size.

I now realize that:

1. The inversion method stinks
2. Low sugar and the inversion method is an especially bad combination.

I promise to never do it again, so please be kind in your responses.

The problem is this--there were 24 jars of perfect jam without mold--most of
which was only 3 days old. They were sealed and had no signs of trouble
when opened. I emptied them into a stock pot in batches of 8 cups, added
some pectin and reboiled and then processed in a water bath (for 15 minutes
instead of the suggested 10). At the risk of the food police breaking into
my pantry and running off with my jams, how bad of an idea was this? Is
this safe?

If I emptied out the top half of the moldy jam (it was only 10 days old) and
reboiled and processed the bottom half of the jam, is having that on an
English muffin considered living on the edge?

I know people used to scrape off and eat moldy jam, but the extension office
recommended I throw away every jar--even the ones with no signs of trouble,
and even the three day old jam--just to be 'safe.' Of course, she also
sounded like the type that actually sterilized her children's binkies so I
am not sure what to think.

Can I get your thoughts?

Thank you so much, and, as God as my witness, I will never inversion again!

Christine






Of course you should throw it out because:
1) it doesn't cost *me* anything to say that
2) it covers *my* ass if you eat it anyway and get sick
3) it's more likely you will remember your lesson that way
4) I get to chirp "When in doubt, throw it out!"

Now that's out of the way, I personally would carefully scrape the top
half-inch out of all the perfect jars and throw it out. Then dump the
jars in a kettle and boil the jam again. The refill hot jars, and
process as usual.

The jars with a little mold, I don't know if I would throw them out, or
scrape the top inch out, reboil, and pour the boiling jam into a quart
jar and stick it in the fridge to be used first and make sure it doesn't
accidently get given away as a gift. I know that's what I would do with
full-sugar jam. You'll have to use your judgement for the low-sugar stuff.

I gotta get to work; I'll have more comments later about the stove.

Best regards,
Bob
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 04:29 PM
George Shirley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

zxcvbob wrote:
Christine wrote:

We have a glass topped range, so the extension office says I shouldn't
use
it for my water bath canners. So I purchased a type of outside cook
stove/burner that runs off propane which is (again according to the
extension office) a good choice. Last year my girlfriends were teasing me
suggesting I just try the 'inversion method' listed in the sure-jell
pectin
recipes.

Two weeks ago I made several batches of strawberry jam. Rather than
haul my
jams outside to boil them in the driveway, I admit I was lazy and
decided to
try the 'inversion method' listed in the pectin recipe. Well, ten days
later I found little bits of mold in the headspace of twelve jars of
low-sugar strawberry jam. The jars and lids were sterilized, the jam was
boiled properly, and all the jars were sealed correctly. Three days
before
I found the moldy jam, I had made more strawberry jam, using the
inversion
method which seemed fine, but again it was only 3 days old. The spots of
mold were only on the surface, and most of them were little bits less
than
1/4 inch in size.

I now realize that:

1. The inversion method stinks
2. Low sugar and the inversion method is an especially bad combination.

I promise to never do it again, so please be kind in your responses.

The problem is this--there were 24 jars of perfect jam without
mold--most of
which was only 3 days old. They were sealed and had no signs of trouble
when opened. I emptied them into a stock pot in batches of 8 cups, added
some pectin and reboiled and then processed in a water bath (for 15
minutes
instead of the suggested 10). At the risk of the food police breaking
into
my pantry and running off with my jams, how bad of an idea was this? Is
this safe?

If I emptied out the top half of the moldy jam (it was only 10 days
old) and
reboiled and processed the bottom half of the jam, is having that on an
English muffin considered living on the edge?

I know people used to scrape off and eat moldy jam, but the extension
office
recommended I throw away every jar--even the ones with no signs of
trouble,
and even the three day old jam--just to be 'safe.' Of course, she also
sounded like the type that actually sterilized her children's binkies
so I
am not sure what to think.

Can I get your thoughts?

Thank you so much, and, as God as my witness, I will never inversion
again!

Christine






Of course you should throw it out because:
1) it doesn't cost *me* anything to say that
2) it covers *my* ass if you eat it anyway and get sick
3) it's more likely you will remember your lesson that way
4) I get to chirp "When in doubt, throw it out!"

Now that's out of the way, I personally would carefully scrape the top
half-inch out of all the perfect jars and throw it out. Then dump the
jars in a kettle and boil the jam again. The refill hot jars, and
process as usual.

The jars with a little mold, I don't know if I would throw them out, or
scrape the top inch out, reboil, and pour the boiling jam into a quart
jar and stick it in the fridge to be used first and make sure it doesn't
accidently get given away as a gift. I know that's what I would do with
full-sugar jam. You'll have to use your judgement for the low-sugar stuff.

I gotta get to work; I'll have more comments later about the stove.

Best regards,
Bob


Wait a minnit! Your post is time stamped 8:34 am and you haven't gone to
work yet, what are you, a banker? By 8:34 CDST I had gone to work,
stopped by Mickey Dee's and ate breakfast with the ROMEO's (Retired Old
Men Eating Out) and had gone home and had a short nap. Boy, you must
have a nice job, no wonder you have time to can stuff. BSEG

George

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 07:27 PM
Christine
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!


"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message

...

snip
Out of curiosity I checked the SJ web site -- in their full instructions
there, they use a boiling water bath to process the jams after sealing.
The inversion method for sealing is mentioned in a separate link and
clearly as an aside. Are they still recommending the inversion method
as a first choice on paper?


No, it's not the first choice, but it's listed below as a second option--and
that was in the low-sugar package.

snip
I hope you'll ring them up and tell them of your experience.


Oh yes! This crisis cost me an emergency trip to the store for more pectin,
lids, and propane--as well as another six hours in the kitchen reprocessing.
I had made about 28 cups of raspberry jam the day before using the inversion
method and those were reprocessed as well. The extension office said those
would be safe if reprocessed as they were less than 24 hours old.

snip
OK. One can hardly argue that the inversion is not a simpler thing to
do at the outset -- but look at what it got YOU: Mold in your product,
anxiety and angst, and a re-do that will probably render your jam safe
for your consumption.

None of which you'd have if the jars had been processed properly in the
first place. Which method ends up to have taken more of your time?


Well, I will return to processing my jams in a WB in the future. I was glad
I found the mold right away--I'd have been really ticked if I discovered the
icky jam in the fall when it would have been completely ruined.

I've never thought the argument about waterbath processing being so hot
held a lot of water -- certainly not for processing sweet spreads. If
the pot's already been boiling for 10 minutes, what's another 5 or 10
minutes with filled jars?


Well, my strawberry jam was *perfect* when I used the inversion method. It
did loose a little flavor once reprocessed, but after all that secondary
cooking I'd expect it to. The raspberry was just as wonderful after the
second processing, so I don't think the waterbath processing negatively
affected my jams.

The red pepper jelly sounds wonderful. What do you use it for? I can see
it poured over a small block of cream cheese and used as a dip.

Christine


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 07:55 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

In article , "Christine"
wrote:

"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...


No, it's not the first choice, but it's listed below as a second
option--and that was in the low-sugar package.


Gotcha.

snip
I hope you'll ring them up and tell them of your experience.


Oh yes! This crisis cost me an emergency trip to the store for more
pectin, lids, and propane--as well as another six hours in the
kitchen reprocessing. I had made about 28 cups of raspberry jam the
day before using the inversion method and those were reprocessed as
well. The extension office said those would be safe if reprocessed
as they were less than 24 hours old.


Oy! PITA.


snip
OK. One can hardly argue that the inversion is not a simpler thing
to do at the outset -- but look at what it got YOU: Mold in your
product, anxiety and angst, and a re-do that will probably render
your jam safe for your consumption.

None of which you'd have if the jars had been processed properly in
the first place. Which method ends up to have taken more of your
time?


Well, I will return to processing my jams in a WB in the future. I
was glad I found the mold right away--I'd have been really ticked if
I discovered the icky jam in the fall when it would have been
completely ruined.


No kidding!

BTW, I wasn't directing the "which method ends up taking more time"
thing to you, specifically. The generic 'you' was in play.


Well, my strawberry jam was *perfect* when I used the inversion
method. It did loose a little flavor once reprocessed, but after all
that secondary cooking I'd expect it to. The raspberry was just as
wonderful after the second processing, so I don't think the waterbath
processing negatively affected my jams.


Good news!


The red pepper jelly sounds wonderful. What do you use it for? I
can see it poured over a small block of cream cheese and used as a
dip.



Christine


That's its common use. Some use it to glaze grilled chicken, too.

Here's the recipe I use:

{ Exported from MasterCook Mac }

Apricot-Red Pepper Jelly

Recipe By: Sunset Canning Book, p 54
Serving Size: 72
Preparation Time: 0:00
Categories: Canning, Preserves, Etc.

Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation Method
1 package (about 6 oz.) dried apricots, chopped (about 1-1/4 cups)
3/4 cup chopped red bell pepper
1/4 cup seeded, chopped fresh red Fresno chiles or
red (or green) jalapeño chiles (4-6
medium-size chiles)
2 1/2 cups cider vinegar
1 1/2 cups water
1 box powdered pectin (1.75 or 2 ounce)
6 cups sugar

In a blender or food processor, chop apricots, peppers, and 1-3/4 cups
of the vinegar until fruit and vegetables are finely ground. Pour into
a heavy-bottomed 8- to 10-quart pan. Rinse food processor/blender with
the 1-1/2 cups water and remaining 3/4 cup vinegar; pour into pan. Stir
in pectin; bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring
constantly. Quickly add sugar, still stirring. Return to a full
rolling boil; then boil, stirring for 1 minute. (If using a 2-oz. box
of pectin, boil for 2 minutes.) Remove from heat and skim off any foam.

Ladle hot jelly into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch
headspace. Wipe rims and threads clean; top with hot lids, then firmly
screw on bands. Process in boiling water canner for 5 minutes.

Or omit processing and ladle jelly into freezer jars or freezer
containers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace; apply lids. Let stand for 12 to
24 hours at room temperature; freeze or refrigerate.

Makes about 6 half-pints. (More like 9)
‹‹‹‹‹
Notes: First Prize at the State Fair, 1993 & 1998; second in 1995 &
'96.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 09:58 PM
George Shirley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

Christine wrote:
"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message


...

snip

Out of curiosity I checked the SJ web site -- in their full instructions
there, they use a boiling water bath to process the jams after sealing.
The inversion method for sealing is mentioned in a separate link and
clearly as an aside. Are they still recommending the inversion method
as a first choice on paper?



No, it's not the first choice, but it's listed below as a second option--and
that was in the low-sugar package.

snip

I hope you'll ring them up and tell them of your experience.



Oh yes! This crisis cost me an emergency trip to the store for more pectin,
lids, and propane--as well as another six hours in the kitchen reprocessing.
I had made about 28 cups of raspberry jam the day before using the inversion
method and those were reprocessed as well. The extension office said those
would be safe if reprocessed as they were less than 24 hours old.

snip

OK. One can hardly argue that the inversion is not a simpler thing to
do at the outset -- but look at what it got YOU: Mold in your product,
anxiety and angst, and a re-do that will probably render your jam safe
for your consumption.

None of which you'd have if the jars had been processed properly in the
first place. Which method ends up to have taken more of your time?



Well, I will return to processing my jams in a WB in the future. I was glad
I found the mold right away--I'd have been really ticked if I discovered the
icky jam in the fall when it would have been completely ruined.


I've never thought the argument about waterbath processing being so hot
held a lot of water -- certainly not for processing sweet spreads. If
the pot's already been boiling for 10 minutes, what's another 5 or 10
minutes with filled jars?



Well, my strawberry jam was *perfect* when I used the inversion method. It
did loose a little flavor once reprocessed, but after all that secondary
cooking I'd expect it to. The raspberry was just as wonderful after the
second processing, so I don't think the waterbath processing negatively
affected my jams.

The red pepper jelly sounds wonderful. What do you use it for? I can see
it poured over a small block of cream cheese and used as a dip.

Christine


Pepper jellies, mild or hot, are excellent on pork, either as a glaze
during cooking or with the cooked pork. I've also used it on chicken but
didn't like it on beef. The cream cheese dip is an old idea that works
well too. I've got some half pints in the pantry that I put up last year
that are almost too hot to eat for us old fogies.

George

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 29-06-2004, 11:57 PM
Pennyaline
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

"Melba's Jammin'" wrote:

big snip

The instructor did a demo of pepper jelly with a recipe using Certo
liquid pectin. When we arrived in the classroom, she had half-pint jars
lined up and filled with warm water and a small saucepan with lids in it
on the stove over a low flame. Ninety minutes later, when she was ready
to fill the jars (the recipe did NOT take that long to do, let me hasten
to add; she spent an hour talking about other stuff before she got to
cooking), she emptied the water from each and dried the inside with a
dish towel. And she filled the jars and sealed them and used the
inversion method because "this is what Certo recommends." She mentioned
the USDA's recommended method for water bath processing but said that
that's hot, takes more time, and this is easier.


For real?? I don't know of any manufacturer of canning products that
actually *recommends* inversion. Everything I've read since parafin went out
of fashion states that the water bath is the only way to go for jellies and
jams that are going to be stored.




  #9 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 02:32 AM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

In article , "Pennyaline"
wrote:

"Melba's Jammin'" wrote:

big snip

The instructor did a demo of pepper jelly with a recipe using Certo
liquid pectin. When we arrived in the classroom, she had half-pint
jars lined up and filled with warm water and a small saucepan with
lids in it on the stove over a low flame. Ninety minutes later,
when she was ready to fill the jars (the recipe did NOT take that
long to do, let me hasten to add; she spent an hour talking about
other stuff before she got to cooking), she emptied the water from
each and dried the inside with a dish towel. And she filled the
jars and sealed them and used the inversion method because "this is
what Certo recommends." She mentioned the USDA's recommended
method for water bath processing but said that that's hot, takes
more time, and this is easier.


For real?? I don't know of any manufacturer of canning products that
actually *recommends* inversion. Everything I've read since parafin
went out of fashion states that the water bath is the only way to go
for jellies and jams that are going to be stored.


See why it should be ME teaching the class next time?
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 05:17 AM
Christine
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!


"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...
Here's the recipe I use:


{ Exported from MasterCook Mac }

Apricot-Red Pepper Jelly

Recipe By: Sunset Canning Book, p 54
Serving Size: 72
Preparation Time: 0:00
Categories: Canning, Preserves, Etc.

Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation Method
1 package (about 6 oz.) dried apricots, chopped (about 1-1/4 cups)
3/4 cup chopped red bell pepper
1/4 cup seeded, chopped fresh red Fresno chiles or
red (or green) jalapeño chiles (4-6
medium-size chiles)
2 1/2 cups cider vinegar
1 1/2 cups water
1 box powdered pectin (1.75 or 2 ounce)
6 cups sugar

In a blender or food processor, chop apricots, peppers, and 1-3/4 cups
of the vinegar until fruit and vegetables are finely ground. Pour into
a heavy-bottomed 8- to 10-quart pan. Rinse food processor/blender with
the 1-1/2 cups water and remaining 3/4 cup vinegar; pour into pan. Stir
in pectin; bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring
constantly. Quickly add sugar, still stirring. Return to a full
rolling boil; then boil, stirring for 1 minute. (If using a 2-oz. box
of pectin, boil for 2 minutes.) Remove from heat and skim off any foam.

Ladle hot jelly into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch
headspace. Wipe rims and threads clean; top with hot lids, then firmly
screw on bands. Process in boiling water canner for 5 minutes.

Or omit processing and ladle jelly into freezer jars or freezer
containers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace; apply lids. Let stand for 12 to
24 hours at room temperature; freeze or refrigerate.

Makes about 6 half-pints. (More like 9)

Notes: First Prize at the State Fair, 1993 & 1998; second in 1995 &
'96.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.


This looks wonderful, I'll be sure to give it a try. I think this is the
friendliest newsgroup I've been in for quite a while. I may have to keep
visiting just for the new recipies.

Christine


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 08:33 AM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

Christine wrote:
"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...

Here's the recipe I use:


{ Exported from MasterCook Mac }

Apricot-Red Pepper Jelly

Recipe By: Sunset Canning Book, p 54
Serving Size: 72
Preparation Time: 0:00
Categories: Canning, Preserves, Etc.

Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation Method
1 package (about 6 oz.) dried apricots, chopped (about 1-1/4 cups)
3/4 cup chopped red bell pepper
1/4 cup seeded, chopped fresh red Fresno chiles or
red (or green) jalapeño chiles (4-6
medium-size chiles)
2 1/2 cups cider vinegar
1 1/2 cups water
1 box powdered pectin (1.75 or 2 ounce)
6 cups sugar

In a blender or food processor, chop apricots, peppers, and 1-3/4 cups
of the vinegar until fruit and vegetables are finely ground. Pour into
a heavy-bottomed 8- to 10-quart pan. Rinse food processor/blender with
the 1-1/2 cups water and remaining 3/4 cup vinegar; pour into pan. Stir
in pectin; bring to a full rolling boil over high heat, stirring
constantly. Quickly add sugar, still stirring. Return to a full
rolling boil; then boil, stirring for 1 minute. (If using a 2-oz. box
of pectin, boil for 2 minutes.) Remove from heat and skim off any foam.

Ladle hot jelly into hot sterilized half-pint jars, leaving 1/4-inch
headspace. Wipe rims and threads clean; top with hot lids, then firmly
screw on bands. Process in boiling water canner for 5 minutes.

Or omit processing and ladle jelly into freezer jars or freezer
containers, leaving 1/2-inch headspace; apply lids. Let stand for 12 to
24 hours at room temperature; freeze or refrigerate.

Makes about 6 half-pints. (More like 9)

Notes: First Prize at the State Fair, 1993 & 1998; second in 1995 &
'96.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.



This looks wonderful, I'll be sure to give it a try. I think this is the
friendliest newsgroup I've been in for quite a while. I may have to keep
visiting just for the new recipies.

Christine




I've made this recipe before, using red habanero peppers instead of the
fresno or jalapeno peppers. I didn't like the vinegar taste. I may try
it again some day using bottled lemon juice instead. For some reason,
the vinegar is OK in straight pepper jelly.

Just my opinion,
Bob
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 02:00 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

In article , "Pennyaline"
wrote:

"Melba's Jammin'" wrote:

big snip

The instructor did a demo of pepper jelly with a recipe using Certo
liquid pectin. When we arrived in the classroom, she had half-pint
jars lined up and filled with warm water and a small saucepan with
lids in it on the stove over a low flame. Ninety minutes later,
when she was ready to fill the jars (the recipe did NOT take that
long to do, let me hasten to add; she spent an hour talking about
other stuff before she got to cooking), she emptied the water from
each and dried the inside with a dish towel. And she filled the
jars and sealed them and used the inversion method because "this is
what Certo recommends." She mentioned the USDA's recommended
method for water bath processing but said that that's hot, takes
more time, and this is easier.


For real?? I don't know of any manufacturer of canning products that
actually *recommends* inversion. Everything I've read since parafin
went out of fashion states that the water bath is the only way to go
for jellies and jams that are going to be stored.


Tell me what you think.

From the Certo instruction leaflet:
"Read these important tips before you start!"
(Basic info snipped -- don't reduce sugar, pectin products are not
interchangeable, don't double recipes, use correct measuring equipment,
etc., etc.)

Followed by directive to use SureJell for Lower sugar Recipes pectin in
pink box for making spreads with less sugar.

Followed by:
"Note: While you can still use the USDA boiling water bath method of
preparing jams and jellies, CERTO has eliminated the need for this step.
Because jams and jellies are high acid foods, jar preparation can be
made simpler by starting with clean jars and working through the recipe
without delay. Contaminants in jars are destroyed when hot fruit
mixtures are poured *immediately, jars covered and inverted. (When
preserving *all other foods*, follow recommended USDA water bath or
pressure-canning methods.

If preparing jams or jellies for a contest or competition, be sure to
check contest rules for jam and jelly processing. Some contests do not
accept the inversion method."

Their jar prep instructions advise: "Wash jars and screw bands in hot,
soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids
in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use."

FWIW.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 02:46 PM
George Shirley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article , "Pennyaline"
wrote:


"Melba's Jammin'" wrote:

big snip

The instructor did a demo of pepper jelly with a recipe using Certo
liquid pectin. When we arrived in the classroom, she had half-pint
jars lined up and filled with warm water and a small saucepan with
lids in it on the stove over a low flame. Ninety minutes later,
when she was ready to fill the jars (the recipe did NOT take that
long to do, let me hasten to add; she spent an hour talking about
other stuff before she got to cooking), she emptied the water from
each and dried the inside with a dish towel. And she filled the
jars and sealed them and used the inversion method because "this is
what Certo recommends." She mentioned the USDA's recommended
method for water bath processing but said that that's hot, takes
more time, and this is easier.


For real?? I don't know of any manufacturer of canning products that
actually *recommends* inversion. Everything I've read since parafin
went out of fashion states that the water bath is the only way to go
for jellies and jams that are going to be stored.



Tell me what you think.

From the Certo instruction leaflet:
"Read these important tips before you start!"
(Basic info snipped -- don't reduce sugar, pectin products are not
interchangeable, don't double recipes, use correct measuring equipment,
etc., etc.)

Followed by directive to use SureJell for Lower sugar Recipes pectin in
pink box for making spreads with less sugar.

Followed by:
"Note: While you can still use the USDA boiling water bath method of
preparing jams and jellies, CERTO has eliminated the need for this step.
Because jams and jellies are high acid foods, jar preparation can be
made simpler by starting with clean jars and working through the recipe
without delay. Contaminants in jars are destroyed when hot fruit
mixtures are poured *immediately, jars covered and inverted. (When
preserving *all other foods*, follow recommended USDA water bath or
pressure-canning methods.

If preparing jams or jellies for a contest or competition, be sure to
check contest rules for jam and jelly processing. Some contests do not
accept the inversion method."

Their jar prep instructions advise: "Wash jars and screw bands in hot,
soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids
in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use."

FWIW.


I think I'll stick with my BWB on jams and jellies, regardless of the
Certo instructions. Of course I don't use Certo anyway. B-)

George

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 06:39 PM
Christine
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!


"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...
In article , "Pennyaline"
wrote:

"Melba's Jammin'" wrote:

big snip

The instructor did a demo of pepper jelly with a recipe using Certo
liquid pectin. When we arrived in the classroom, she had half-pint
jars lined up and filled with warm water and a small saucepan with
lids in it on the stove over a low flame. Ninety minutes later,
when she was ready to fill the jars (the recipe did NOT take that
long to do, let me hasten to add; she spent an hour talking about
other stuff before she got to cooking), she emptied the water from
each and dried the inside with a dish towel. And she filled the
jars and sealed them and used the inversion method because "this is
what Certo recommends." She mentioned the USDA's recommended
method for water bath processing but said that that's hot, takes
more time, and this is easier.


For real?? I don't know of any manufacturer of canning products that
actually *recommends* inversion. Everything I've read since parafin
went out of fashion states that the water bath is the only way to go
for jellies and jams that are going to be stored.


Tell me what you think.

From the Certo instruction leaflet:
"Read these important tips before you start!"
(Basic info snipped -- don't reduce sugar, pectin products are not
interchangeable, don't double recipes, use correct measuring equipment,
etc., etc.)

Followed by directive to use SureJell for Lower sugar Recipes pectin in
pink box for making spreads with less sugar.

Followed by:
"Note: While you can still use the USDA boiling water bath method of
preparing jams and jellies, CERTO has eliminated the need for this step.
Because jams and jellies are high acid foods, jar preparation can be
made simpler by starting with clean jars and working through the recipe
without delay. Contaminants in jars are destroyed when hot fruit
mixtures are poured *immediately, jars covered and inverted. (When
preserving *all other foods*, follow recommended USDA water bath or
pressure-canning methods.

If preparing jams or jellies for a contest or competition, be sure to
check contest rules for jam and jelly processing. Some contests do not
accept the inversion method."

Their jar prep instructions advise: "Wash jars and screw bands in hot,
soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids
in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use."

FWIW.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.



Well that is exactly what I did, the jam was still bubbling when I put it in
the clean jars and capped them with the lids left in a saucepan of hot
water. I ended up with jars that sealed properly, but moldy jam inside
them. It was low-sugar jam though. A full-sugar product might do better as
sugar helps to preserve things, but after the frustration of remaking my
jams, I'll be using my hot water bath for everything I preserve. It was
mortifying to have to call my kid's teachers and recommend the freshly made
jam we had just given them as a gift needed to be put in the fridge right
away. (it was only 2 days old but not WB processed).

Christine


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2004, 08:13 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Jam crisis--inversion method stinks!

In article , "Christine"
wrote:
(snip)
Well that is exactly what I did, the jam was still bubbling when I
put it in the clean jars and capped them with the lids left in a
saucepan of hot water. I ended up with jars that sealed properly,
but moldy jam inside them. It was low-sugar jam though. A
full-sugar product might do better as sugar helps to preserve things,
but after the frustration of remaking my jams, I'll be using my hot
water bath for everything I preserve. It was mortifying to have to
call my kid's teachers and recommend the freshly made jam we had just
given them as a gift needed to be put in the fridge right away. (it
was only 2 days old but not WB processed).

Christine


Ugh! I feel your pain, Woman! That's a b**** of a call to have to make
-- "Uh, that great jam I gave you? Maybe it's not so great after all."

So far, I've had one seal failure - and that was a lid that was probably
5 years old. (I don't do many spreads in wide mouth jars any more.)
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 6/27/04.

 




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