A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » Preserving
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Sauerkraut not fermenting



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 07:53 PM
RichK
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 08:22 PM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

RichK wrote:
I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have about 1/10
pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you used.

Best regards,
Bob
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 08:23 PM
Bob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

RichK wrote:
I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you used.

Best regards,
Bob


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 08:38 PM
RichK
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

Your answer is interesting. 3T is about 1.3 oz, which is 1/12 lb. The 3T
figure came from 3 different sources.
"Bob" wrote in message
...
RichK wrote:
I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting

for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per

quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you

used.

Best regards,
Bob



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 09:38 PM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

I read it wrong. I read 3 tablespoons, but thought 1 tablespoon. It still
may have not been enough salt, depending on what brand of kosher salt you
used and how fluffy they mill it. Other than that, I don't know what might
be wrong.

-Bob


RichK wrote:
Your answer is interesting. 3T is about 1.3 oz, which is 1/12 lb. The 3T
figure came from 3 different sources.
"Bob" wrote in message
...

RichK wrote:

I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting


for 2

weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per


quart

of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you


used.

Best regards,
Bob



  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 10:02 PM
RichK
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

Thanks. It smells like it is working, so I'll just leave it alone. It may
be slow because of cool temperatures.
"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
I read it wrong. I read 3 tablespoons, but thought 1 tablespoon. It

still
may have not been enough salt, depending on what brand of kosher salt you
used and how fluffy they mill it. Other than that, I don't know what

might
be wrong.

-Bob


RichK wrote:
Your answer is interesting. 3T is about 1.3 oz, which is 1/12 lb. The

3T
figure came from 3 different sources.
"Bob" wrote in message
...

RichK wrote:

I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes

I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting


for 2

weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after

that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs

of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per


quart

of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you


used.

Best regards,
Bob




  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 10:05 PM
Ross Reid
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

"RichK" wrote:

I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


First of all, are you sure it's not fermenting? Kraut does not have a
very active/visible fermentation like beer or wine. Are you able to
see any small bubbles rising to the surface? This is where fermenting
in one gallon glass jars works great for beginning kraut makers.
Next, the accepted ratio of salt to cabbage for making kraut is 2.25%
to 2.5% by weight. This is much easier to show in metric:
5lb. of cabbage is 2,268 grams.
Kosher salt weighs 18 grams per Tablespoon
Therefore, 3T is 54 grams.
54/2268*100 = 2.38%.
Pretty well dead center of the accepted ratio so your salt additions
were dead on target and you can quit worrying about that part anyway.
However, many other factors affect sauerkraut production e.g.
Did you mix the salt and cabbage shreds well?
Did you then vigorously tamp the mix down so that the cabbage shreds
were bruised to release juice? Good kraut cabbage should release
enough juice that the addition of brine is unnecessary.
Are the cabbage shreds covered by at least an inch, (preferably more),
of brine?
What is the ambient temperature where you have the kraut fermenting?
Ideal is between 66F and 70F and at that temperature the kraut will
take approximately 6-8 weeks to finish.
Much lower than 55F and the kraut may not ferment at all and, if it
does, it will take considerably longer, up to 6 months or more to
finish.
Much higher than 80F and it will probably finish in less than two
weeks but, there is a possibility that it will go bad. If it turns
pink, throw it out. Even if it doesn't go bad, the flavour will suffer
since some of the main bacteria responsible for the production of
flavor-contributing esters are greatly inhibited at higher
temperatures .
Lack of scum that must be removed is not an indication of no
fermentation. I've been making kraut for at least 25 years and don't
recall ever having to remove any scum in all those years.

Hope this has been of some help.

Ross.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-04-2004, 11:04 PM
RichK
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

Thanks
"Ross Reid" wrote in message
s.com...
"RichK" wrote:

I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting

for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per

quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


First of all, are you sure it's not fermenting? Kraut does not have a
very active/visible fermentation like beer or wine. Are you able to
see any small bubbles rising to the surface? This is where fermenting
in one gallon glass jars works great for beginning kraut makers.
Next, the accepted ratio of salt to cabbage for making kraut is 2.25%
to 2.5% by weight. This is much easier to show in metric:
5lb. of cabbage is 2,268 grams.
Kosher salt weighs 18 grams per Tablespoon
Therefore, 3T is 54 grams.
54/2268*100 = 2.38%.
Pretty well dead center of the accepted ratio so your salt additions
were dead on target and you can quit worrying about that part anyway.
However, many other factors affect sauerkraut production e.g.
Did you mix the salt and cabbage shreds well?
Did you then vigorously tamp the mix down so that the cabbage shreds
were bruised to release juice? Good kraut cabbage should release
enough juice that the addition of brine is unnecessary.
Are the cabbage shreds covered by at least an inch, (preferably more),
of brine?
What is the ambient temperature where you have the kraut fermenting?
Ideal is between 66F and 70F and at that temperature the kraut will
take approximately 6-8 weeks to finish.
Much lower than 55F and the kraut may not ferment at all and, if it
does, it will take considerably longer, up to 6 months or more to
finish.
Much higher than 80F and it will probably finish in less than two
weeks but, there is a possibility that it will go bad. If it turns
pink, throw it out. Even if it doesn't go bad, the flavour will suffer
since some of the main bacteria responsible for the production of
flavor-contributing esters are greatly inhibited at higher
temperatures .
Lack of scum that must be removed is not an indication of no
fermentation. I've been making kraut for at least 25 years and don't
recall ever having to remove any scum in all those years.

Hope this has been of some help.

Ross.


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 04-04-2004, 03:28 AM
Bruce
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

Sauerkraut can be made with much less salt than orthodox sources quote.
I've been making it for 20 years with just as much salt as tastes right and doesn't make it taste too salty to eat raw from the jar.
The odd jar goes off but not many.

I grow my own organic cabbage though, and normally process them the day they are picked and I am sure this is a factor in my
success. The fresher the cabbage is the more lactic acid bacteria there will be present on the leaves.

The book I have, "Making Sauerkraut and Pickled Vegetables at Home", has in it a method for making sauerkraut with no salt at all.

The amount of skum is only an indicator of how fast the kraut is being consumed by spoilage organisms.
Made in an enviornment that excludes oxygen sauerkraut never developes skum.
The amount of CO2 gas generated by the ferment would be a better indication of its vigor.

Regards, Bruce



From: "Bob"

RichKRichRicohReichRetchRoach wrote:
I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbslobslibslabsBsls of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurmentmeasurementmeasurements, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you used.

Best regards,
Bob



  #10 (permalink)  
Old 04-04-2004, 03:50 AM
Ellen Wickberg
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

in article ipKbc.2489$J56.1697@edtnps89, Bruce at
wrote on 3/4/04 7:28 pm:

Sauerkraut can be made with much less salt than orthodox sources quote.
I've been making it for 20 years with just as much salt as tastes right and
doesn't make it taste too salty to eat raw from the jar.
The odd jar goes off but not many.

I grow my own organic cabbage though, and normally process them the day they
are picked and I am sure this is a factor in my
success. The fresher the cabbage is the more lactic acid bacteria there will
be present on the leaves.

The book I have, "Making Sauerkraut and Pickled Vegetables at Home", has in it
a method for making sauerkraut with no salt at all.

The amount of skum is only an indicator of how fast the kraut is being
consumed by spoilage organisms.
Made in an enviornment that excludes oxygen sauerkraut never developes skum.
The amount of CO2 gas generated by the ferment would be a better indication of
its vigor.

Regards, Bruce



From: "Bob"

RichKRichRicohReichRetchRoach wrote:
I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5
lbslobslibslabsBsls of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurmentmeasurementmeasurements,
but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you used.

Best regards,
Bob



Who is the author of your book?
Ellen

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 04-04-2004, 12:40 PM
pickle
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting


"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
I read it wrong. I read 3 tablespoons, but thought 1 tablespoon. It

still
may have not been enough salt, depending on what brand of kosher salt you
used and how fluffy they mill it. Other than that, I don't know what

might
be wrong.

-Bob


RichK wrote:
Your answer is interesting. 3T is about 1.3 oz, which is 1/12 lb. The

3T
figure came from 3 different sources.
"Bob" wrote in message
...

RichK wrote:

I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes

I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting


for 2

weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after

that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs

of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per


quart

of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.


You didn't use nearly enough salt. Five pounds of cabbage should have
about 1/10 pound of salt. I'm not sure what to expect at the ratio you


used.

Best regards,
Bob


Say Hey !!


The way we prepare it is shred a bunch of cabbage in a 5 gallon plastic
bucket. Handful of salt goes on the bottom of the bucket. Layer a bunch of
cabbage and then throw another layer of salt on. Do this until your out of
cabbage (we use l0 kgs (22 lbs). Throw layer of salt on top of cabbage and
then nicely pack cheese cloth around the cabbage. Let it ferment. Remove and
clean cheese cloth daily after (fermenting) bubbling begins. Do NOT stir the
cabbage. Should be ready in 5/6 weeks but here in Thailand the cabbage is
now a golden color and is called kraut - about two (2) weeks. Temperatures
higher here in SEA.


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 05-04-2004, 07:29 AM
Bruce
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sauerkraut not fermenting

"Ellen Wickberg" wrote

Who is the author of your book?
Ellen



The version I have was authored by Annelies Schoneck, a German lady.
I see that the new edition of it has a coauthor cited:

Making Sauerkraut and Pickled Vegetables at Home: Creative Recipes for Lactic Fermented Food to Improve Your Health
by Klaus Kaufmann, Annelies Schoneck

Amazon has it on sale:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...415458-9887103

It's a good book. Well worth it to purchase for anyone interested in making fermented vegetables of any kind.

Regads, Bruce




  #14 (permalink)  
Old 30-11-2004, 03:16 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichK
I am trying to make sauerkraut for the first time, and all the recipes I
have seen talk about skimming the scum every day. It has been sitting for 2
weeks. After several days, I had a little scum, but nothing after that.
Does this mean I have too much salt? I used 3T Kosher salt per 5 lbs of
cabbage. I needed more brine to cover the cabbage and used 1.5T per quart
of water. I don't think I screwed up the measurment, but it's always
possible. I just expected more activity.
Mine didn't do much for the first couple of weeks either. It eventually started "working" (liberating a little gas) but I never developed any foam, scum, etc. Mine was done at "room temperature", about 70f.

I only used 1 tablespoon of salt per cabbage...

I taste of the "liquor" might give you a bit of encouragement...

I agitated mine every couple of days and pressed the top plate down a little...

I saw one referance to using a little bit (teaspoon) of unpasturized, unflavored, unsweetened yohugrt (ok... you spell it) as a starter but if you don't have and mold I'd say good things come to those who wait...
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sauerkraut Juice PENMART01 General Cooking 3 03-06-2004 07:44 PM
REQ: Recipe for Rosoff's Sauerkraut Hizzonnah General Cooking 0 20-04-2004 07:28 PM
Sauerkraut George Shirley Preserving 9 16-03-2004 08:56 AM
Easy homemade sauerkraut rdoiron Preserving 9 01-01-2004 06:40 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.