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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Canning peppers in oil



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 07:23 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 3
Default Canning peppers in oil

I just tried canning for the first time and I canned some pasta gravey
and it went well all the lids sucked up tight. Then I tried some mixed
peppers in oil. My question is after the lids sucked down and the jars
cooled off the oil became cloudy. Is that normal?

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 04:13 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default Canning peppers in oil

Jer wrote:

I just tried canning for the first time and I canned some pasta gravey
and it went well all the lids sucked up tight. Then I tried some mixed
peppers in oil. My question is after the lids sucked down and the jars
cooled off the oil became cloudy. Is that normal?


Jer - A sealed lid do not a potable product make. Y'all didn't say what
your recipe was and which method you used, boiling water bath or pressure
canning. For the gravy, anyways. BWB for the "pasta gravy" (tomato sauce
base?) might be all right if the pH was 4.6 or below. Hard to tell without
testing or the recipe. pH test strips are available in scientific supply
stores or educational science type stores. Or a brewer's store.
Peppers in oil sounds like a recipe for disaster at the home level. Even
with pressure canning, you might not get the heat necessary to destroy
botulism germs which live everywhere. That combination of juicy peppers
(moisture) in anaerobic environment of oil & canning is downright
dangerous. Don't eat them, destroy as toxic waste, sterilize jars before
you use them again.
Check out our FAQ at http://www.jaclu.com/rfpFAQ/rfpFAQ.htm
Edrena



  #3 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 403
Default Canning peppers in oil

"Jer" wrote:

I just tried canning for the first time and I canned some pasta gravey
and it went well all the lids sucked up tight. Then I tried some mixed
peppers in oil. My question is after the lids sucked down and the jars
cooled off the oil became cloudy. Is that normal?


I hope your peppers were canned in an approved pickling solution and
not in oil only. Low acid foods in oil can be very dangerous. Check
out: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_06/...d_peppers.html
To email, remove the "obvious" from my address.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 988
Default Canning peppers in oil

The Joneses wrote:

For the gravy, anyways. BWB for the "pasta gravy" (tomato sauce
base?)


Yeah, that's New English for "tomato sauce" particularly in parts of MA
and RI.

B/
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 07:15 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 988
Default Canning peppers in oil

Brian Mailman wrote:

The Joneses wrote:

For the gravy, anyways. BWB for the "pasta gravy" (tomato sauce
base?)


Yeah, that's New English for "tomato sauce" particularly in parts of MA
and RI.


erf, I meant "tomato gravy." Not familiar with the usage "pasta gravy"
(considering most in that region seem to call pasta either "spaghetti"
or "macaroni") but probably same thing.

B/
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 11:20 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 3
Default Canning peppers in oil

I cut up some sport peppers, celerey,carrots, and califlower then
pickled them in vinagar for a couple of days. Then drained them and
put into jars and filled them with veg oil. I let it set to make sure
all the air bubbles were gone then used the BWB method. When I took
them out of the boiling water the liquid wea clear. As the jars cooled
that's when the oil began to cloud up. After a day, still cloudy.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2006, 11:25 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 611
Default Canning peppers in oil


"Brian Mailman" wrote in message
...
Brian Mailman wrote:

The Joneses wrote:

For the gravy, anyways. BWB for the "pasta gravy" (tomato sauce
base?)


Yeah, that's New English for "tomato sauce" particularly in parts of MA
and RI.


erf, I meant "tomato gravy." Not familiar with the usage "pasta gravy"
(considering most in that region seem to call pasta either "spaghetti"
or "macaroni") but probably same thing.

B/


sounds like 'poison' to me....;-)

Kathi


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2006, 02:45 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default Canning peppers in oil

Jer wrote:

I cut up some sport peppers, celerey,carrots, and califlower then
pickled them in vinagar for a couple of days. Then drained them and
put into jars and filled them with veg oil. I let it set to make sure
all the air bubbles were gone then used the BWB method. When I took
them out of the boiling water the liquid wea clear. As the jars cooled
that's when the oil began to cloud up. After a day, still cloudy.


Sounds to me like some of the moisture and or veggie bits in the pickle
combined with the oil. In _Joy of Pickling_, the author has a few recipes
containing oils, one is marinated dried tomatoes, then covered in olive
oil & refrigerated; a cucumber pickle with a layer of oil on top, also
just refrigerated. I've canned pickled mixed peppers many times with a
tablespoon of olive oil on top, and a couple other various relishes with a
little oil in the recipe. I think the pickling first is a good idea, but
dunno if that will completely eliminate the risks.
I think Bob(this one) Pastorio makes flavored oils - whattya think Bob?
You might want to write the USDA's partner, the Univ of Georgia's
National Center for Home Food Preservation: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/ Dr.
Andress has been very helpful in the past.
Let us know what you find out.
Edrena


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2006, 05:17 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,025
Default Canning peppers in oil

The Joneses wrote:
Jer wrote:

I cut up some sport peppers, celerey,carrots, and califlower then
pickled them in vinagar for a couple of days. Then drained them and
put into jars and filled them with veg oil. I let it set to make sure
all the air bubbles were gone then used the BWB method. When I took
them out of the boiling water the liquid wea clear. As the jars cooled
that's when the oil began to cloud up. After a day, still cloudy.


Why did you do this? What were you trying to achieve?

Sounds to me like some of the moisture and or veggie bits in the pickle
combined with the oil. In _Joy of Pickling_, the author has a few recipes
containing oils, one is marinated dried tomatoes, then covered in olive
oil & refrigerated; a cucumber pickle with a layer of oil on top, also
just refrigerated. I've canned pickled mixed peppers many times with a
tablespoon of olive oil on top, and a couple other various relishes with a
little oil in the recipe. I think the pickling first is a good idea, but
dunno if that will completely eliminate the risks.
I think Bob(this one) Pastorio makes flavored oils - whattya think Bob?


Guess: Acidifying the peppers *in theory* would help. Their pH should be
low enough to be safe. That's all theoretical. The veggies listed above
won't appreciably flavor the oil.

Having said that, I wouldn't do it unless I had a tested recipe for it.
The advice below is the smartest.

Pastorio

You might want to write the USDA's partner, the Univ of Georgia's
National Center for Home Food Preservation: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/ Dr.
Andress has been very helpful in the past.
Let us know what you find out.
Edrena

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2006, 01:38 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 51
Default Canning peppers in oil

Jer, I assume you were trying to make Giardeneira, correct?

Yes, some do use a vinegar bath first, but for two days ought to make
that a real vinegary mess.

It may have possibly been the Cauliflower that caused the pepper mix to
cloud?

I make Giardeneira when I can get decent peppers (Sport-Green
Cayenne-Finger-Hots), and living here in NM, that is almost never,
believe it or not, unless I grow them myself. All you see here is
Jalapeno, Serrano, and new Mexican Big Jims, and none of these I feel
are suitable.

This is what I use, and do, when I make Giardeneira:
First, if you clean-wash the peppers (Cayenne-Sport-Fingerhot), you must
make sure they are totally dry.
A 1/3-1/2 lb of peppers makes a ton!
3 Stalks of Fresh Celery, washed, and thoroughly dry. One small 7oz jar
of small Pimento Stuffed Green Olives, drained, and dried as much as
possible on a few paper towels (Save the Juice for Dirty Martinis!)
Two heaping Tablespoons of Capers in Brine, and also drained-dried on
Paper Towels.

Chop Peppers into 5/16" slices, discarding the tops-stems, slice celery
into small slices, throw in a large Stainless Steel, or Glass Bowl, add
the Olives whole, add the Capers, and take a large bottle of either
Canola, or Vegetable Oil, and pour over the mixture, making sure that
the mix is totally immersed by the oil.

Store in a cool place, cover with aluminum foil. Every day for a week,
check, and make sure the mix remains submersed in the oil, and push down
any floaters with a spoon.

After one week of sitting, you may take this mixture, spoon into jars,
and make sure you leave a good 1/2" of oil at the top to keep the mix
submersed while stored.

You may then cap the mixture without worry of any explosive mishaps.
Store in a cool cupboard, and within 3-4 weeks, this mixture will be
ready to eat, and the peppers-celery won't be hard as rocks.

Shelf life is easily one year, or more, and the oil will take on an
Olive Oil Flavor. The amount of brine-salt from the Olives-Capers is
enough to flavor the mix, adequately without being horribly vinegary.

Beautiful on Pasta, Sandwiches, etc, and I have never, I repeat NEVER
gotten sick using this recipe. There's no need to boil-vacuum pack,
provided you use the oil bath to preserve this.

No doubt even your recipe would work better without boiling. The
Vinegar Bath, and the immersion in Oil should be enough. Mark

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2006, 01:57 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 4,517
Default Canning peppers in oil

Mark D wrote:
Jer, I assume you were trying to make Giardeneira, correct?

Yes, some do use a vinegar bath first, but for two days ought to make
that a real vinegary mess.

It may have possibly been the Cauliflower that caused the pepper mix to
cloud?

I make Giardeneira when I can get decent peppers (Sport-Green
Cayenne-Finger-Hots), and living here in NM, that is almost never,
believe it or not, unless I grow them myself. All you see here is
Jalapeno, Serrano, and new Mexican Big Jims, and none of these I feel
are suitable.

This is what I use, and do, when I make Giardeneira:
First, if you clean-wash the peppers (Cayenne-Sport-Fingerhot), you must
make sure they are totally dry.
A 1/3-1/2 lb of peppers makes a ton!
3 Stalks of Fresh Celery, washed, and thoroughly dry. One small 7oz jar
of small Pimento Stuffed Green Olives, drained, and dried as much as
possible on a few paper towels (Save the Juice for Dirty Martinis!)
Two heaping Tablespoons of Capers in Brine, and also drained-dried on
Paper Towels.

Chop Peppers into 5/16" slices, discarding the tops-stems, slice celery
into small slices, throw in a large Stainless Steel, or Glass Bowl, add
the Olives whole, add the Capers, and take a large bottle of either
Canola, or Vegetable Oil, and pour over the mixture, making sure that
the mix is totally immersed by the oil.

Store in a cool place, cover with aluminum foil. Every day for a week,
check, and make sure the mix remains submersed in the oil, and push down
any floaters with a spoon.

After one week of sitting, you may take this mixture, spoon into jars,
and make sure you leave a good 1/2" of oil at the top to keep the mix
submersed while stored.

You may then cap the mixture without worry of any explosive mishaps.
Store in a cool cupboard, and within 3-4 weeks, this mixture will be
ready to eat, and the peppers-celery won't be hard as rocks.

Shelf life is easily one year, or more, and the oil will take on an
Olive Oil Flavor. The amount of brine-salt from the Olives-Capers is
enough to flavor the mix, adequately without being horribly vinegary.

Beautiful on Pasta, Sandwiches, etc, and I have never, I repeat NEVER
gotten sick using this recipe. There's no need to boil-vacuum pack,
provided you use the oil bath to preserve this.

No doubt even your recipe would work better without boiling. The
Vinegar Bath, and the immersion in Oil should be enough. Mark



Very dangerous recipe, in my opinion.

Bob
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2006, 02:15 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 51
Default Canning peppers in oil

Well Bob, Your 100% wrong.
It is not dangerous. In the absence of air, no spoilage occurs.

Here's another oil preserving method I'll tell you about. I have a
friend who lives in Chicago (Italian from the old country)
Every winter, he makes 120-150lbs of Italian Sausage, Capocollo.and
Supresata Salamies.

Know what he does with it all? He dries it. Well, naturally he cannot
eat 140lbs of pork sausage, etc when this sausage is at the correct
dryness, and is ready to eat.(well actually about 75lbs, as it loses
just about 1/2 its weight)

Know what he does with much of it? He jars much of this sausage
immersed in Oil. Evidently a method that has been known for 100's of
years, and I've had it, and also never gotten sick.

Nothing is vacuum packed, boiled, nada.

The previous recipe I listed works, and works very good. mark

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2006, 02:33 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 192
Default Canning peppers in oil

Mark D wrote:
Well Bob, Your 100% wrong.
It is not dangerous. In the absence of air, no spoilage occurs.

Here's another oil preserving method I'll tell you about. I have a
friend who lives in Chicago (Italian from the old country)
Every winter, he makes 120-150lbs of Italian Sausage, Capocollo.and
Supresata Salamies.

Know what he does with it all? He dries it. Well, naturally he cannot
eat 140lbs of pork sausage, etc when this sausage is at the correct
dryness, and is ready to eat.(well actually about 75lbs, as it loses
just about 1/2 its weight)

Know what he does with much of it? He jars much of this sausage
immersed in Oil. Evidently a method that has been known for 100's of
years, and I've had it, and also never gotten sick.

Nothing is vacuum packed, boiled, nada.

The previous recipe I listed works, and works very good. mark

In the absence of air a certain kind of deadly spoilage could occur. It
is botulism. No evidence( bubbling, smelling , etc.) would be evident,
but you could die. Botulism is extremely rare, but since it gives no
warning signs, it hardly seems worth risking its growth. Botulism only
can grow if you are successful in making sure that there is no oxygen
present. If you are not concerned about your own risk you probably
shoiuld not offer this potentially deadly mixture to others.
Ellen
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2006, 02:51 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 980
Default Canning peppers in oil

Mark D wrote:

Well Bob, Your 100% wrong.
It is not dangerous. In the absence of air, no spoilage occurs.

Here's another oil preserving method I'll tell you about. I have a
friend who lives in Chicago (Italian from the old country)
Every winter, he makes 120-150lbs of Italian Sausage, Capocollo.and
Supresata Salamies.

Know what he does with it all? He dries it. Well, naturally he cannot
eat 140lbs of pork sausage, etc when this sausage is at the correct
dryness, and is ready to eat.(well actually about 75lbs, as it loses
just about 1/2 its weight)

Know what he does with much of it? He jars much of this sausage
immersed in Oil. Evidently a method that has been known for 100's of
years, and I've had it, and also never gotten sick.

Nothing is vacuum packed, boiled, nada.

The previous recipe I listed works, and works very good. mark


Mark,

Dried meat stored in oil, or any dried product for that matter,
won't spoil because of the fact that it's it's dried, not because
of the oil.

Botulism requires moisture to survive. It needs a water activity
level of at least 0.93. Dry cured sausage is well below that level,
fresh peppers are not.

See table 3-3
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~comm/ift4-3.html

There's no such thing as an "oil preserving" method. The sausage
is preserved by curing and drying, not by immersing in oil.

--
Reg

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2006, 07:21 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Canning peppers in oil

Reg wrote:

There's no such thing as an "oil preserving" method. The sausage
is preserved by curing and drying, not by immersing in oil.


Yes. It is stored in oil. The oil (or more likley the jars) keep vermin out
such as bugs, rodents, teenagers, etc. You would be surprised how much salami
a hungry teenager will eat. :-)

Geoff.


--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 IL Fax: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
 




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