A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » Preserving
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Dehydrating cooked noodles



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2006, 01:41 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 146
Default Dehydrating cooked noodles

I have recently bought a food dehydrator. I would like to dehydrate
cooked noodles to make instant meals with. I want to make up little
packages of dried food, such as noodles, some dried vegetables and
soup powder and put them in little bags.

Then I can dump a bag in a bowl, add hot water and have an instant meal
without the high fat content of fried noodles, the high salt and MSG
content of commercial products and at a lower cost.

I can also tailor them to exactly what each person likes, there are four
of us in the family and we all have different tastes. :-)

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance,

BTW, what are they called in the U.S.? In Israel they are called "mana hama"
(hot meals, but with a biblical connotation). When I lived in the U.S. they
were called "ramen noodles", but ramen were only noodles and soup in plastic
wrap, they did not include vegetables or come in a container.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 IL Fax: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:39 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,025
Default Dehydrating cooked noodles

Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

I have recently bought a food dehydrator. I would like to dehydrate
cooked noodles to make instant meals with. I want to make up little
packages of dried food, such as noodles, some dried vegetables and
soup powder and put them in little bags.

Then I can dump a bag in a bowl, add hot water and have an instant meal
without the high fat content of fried noodles, the high salt and MSG
content of commercial products and at a lower cost.


Unfortunately, it won't work that way. The noodles in instant soup
packages aren't just regular noodles that have been cooked and run
through a dehydrator. Dehydrated veggies won't reconstitute instantly;
some require a period of either simmering or soaking in hot water.

I'm afraid this won't happen as you would wish.

Pastorio

I can also tailor them to exactly what each person likes, there are four
of us in the family and we all have different tastes. :-)

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance,

BTW, what are they called in the U.S.? In Israel they are called "mana hama"
(hot meals, but with a biblical connotation). When I lived in the U.S. they
were called "ramen noodles", but ramen were only noodles and soup in plastic
wrap, they did not include vegetables or come in a container.

Geoff.

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 06:11 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 146
Default Dehydrating cooked noodles

Bob (this one) wrote:
Unfortunately, it won't work that way. The noodles in instant soup
packages aren't just regular noodles that have been cooked and run
through a dehydrator. Dehydrated veggies won't reconstitute instantly;
some require a period of either simmering or soaking in hot water.

I'm afraid this won't happen as you would wish.


Thanks, geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 IL Fax: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 15-03-2006, 07:39 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Dehydrating cooked noodles

Bob (this one) wrote...
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

I have recently bought a food dehydrator. I would like to dehydrate
cooked noodles to make instant meals with. I want to make up little
packages of dried food, such as noodles, some dried vegetables and
soup powder and put them in little bags.
Then I can dump a bag in a bowl, add hot water and have an instant meal
without the high fat content of fried noodles, the high salt and MSG
content of commercial products and at a lower cost.



Unfortunately, it won't work that way. The noodles in instant soup
packages aren't just regular noodles that have been cooked and run
through a dehydrator. Dehydrated veggies won't reconstitute instantly;
some require a period of either simmering or soaking in hot water.

I'm afraid this won't happen as you would wish.


Yeah, I noticed the high fat content and assume it's part of the
noodle-manufacturing process. I'm guessing that the ramen noodles
have been fried before being dehydrated, creating bubbles or
something within that allows them to quickly absorb water later.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 15-03-2006, 08:51 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 146
Default Dehydrating cooked noodles

Buddah Stalin wrote:

Yeah, I noticed the high fat content and assume it's part of the
noodle-manufacturing process. I'm guessing that the ramen noodles
have been fried before being dehydrated, creating bubbles or
something within that allows them to quickly absorb water later.


I would have thought so too. However there is one brand of quick noodles
that advertises it self as "diet" and low fat. They claim the noodles are
baked, not fried.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 IL Fax: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Searing meat sealing in juice -- General Cooking 33 18-05-2005 10:27 PM
Salmon over Noodles with Miso Broth Kristin Knaus Satterlee Recipes (moderated) 0 10-06-2004 09:53 PM
Nick Z's Shanghai Pan-Fried Noodles Duckie Recipes 0 06-06-2004 02:36 PM
Neptunes Noodles with Crab Meat Sauce Duckie Recipes 0 20-05-2004 10:25 PM
Sausage lasagna w/ cinnamon Chris and Bob Neidecker General Cooking 5 08-10-2003 11:08 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.