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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

best apples for jelly



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 01:28 AM
Bunny McElwee
Usenet poster
 
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Default best apples for jelly

I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in t he
past, with both regular apples as well as a bottled apple juice. Both turned
out like syrup, not jelly, both used Sure Jell, followed the directions, to
no avail. What are the best type of apples to use for jelly? Most recipes
say xx number of pounds of apples, but they don't say what kind. Some say
sour apples, but do they mean Granny Smith? My grandmothers apple jelly was
always a pinkish/red color, and that would be untrue of a granny smith. She
also says she's always made her jelly from the skins of red apples, hence
the pinkish/red jelly, but can't remember what kind. Can anyone lead me in
the right direction? I understand Red Delicious is not an acceptable choice
since it is not "sour" enough. Any help would be appreciated.

I've had similar issues with Grape Jelly. My problem is I don't live in
an area that has access to Concords, so I can't use them. The only access I
have is to Red Globes (Do not make jelly, but make a pretty sickening sweet
syrup, much to my dismay) Red seedless and green grapes. I've also tried to
make jelly from bottled or frozen concentrates, to no avail. They always end
up syrupy. I've not been able to find one that I can use that will setup
firm like jelly.

Thanks in advance for any help!

--
Bunny McElwee
Event Coordinator & Membership
Lowcountry Miata Club
www.lowcountrymiataclub.net

1991 Mariner Blue with Red & White Stripes
"BlueFlash"


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 01:53 AM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bunny McElwee wrote:
I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in t he
past, with both regular apples as well as a bottled apple juice. Both turned
out like syrup, not jelly, both used Sure Jell, followed the directions, to
no avail. What are the best type of apples to use for jelly? Most recipes
say xx number of pounds of apples, but they don't say what kind. Some say
sour apples, but do they mean Granny Smith? My grandmothers apple jelly was
always a pinkish/red color, and that would be untrue of a granny smith. She
also says she's always made her jelly from the skins of red apples, hence
the pinkish/red jelly, but can't remember what kind. Can anyone lead me in
the right direction? I understand Red Delicious is not an acceptable choice
since it is not "sour" enough. Any help would be appreciated.



Are there any crabapple trees in your area? They should be covered with
fruit right now; I'm planning to pick some over at the water dept. this
weekend if nobody beats me to 'em. I still have too much crabapple
jelly leftover from last year, so I may use them to flavor and color
some mead (it's called cyser when you add apple juice to the honey.)
Use all crabapples or a mixture of crabapple juice and regular apple juice.

[snipped the part about grapes]

I don't know much about making grape jelly, but
(1) you might have better luck with making jam
(2) try finding some wild grapes. It's too bad you can't get Concords,
but what about Muscadines or sour "mustang" grapes?

Best regards,
Bob
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 02:17 AM
Bunny McElwee
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Not that I know of. I've never heard of anyone talking about them and
I've never seen one. I'll ask around and see if anyone has access to them.
In the meantime, I'm still looking for other ways to make Apple Jelly.


As doe the grapes, yes, I do have access to Muscadine and Scuppernog
grapes. I've actually got recipes for Jams for both types, but no Jelly
recipes. My husband only likes Concord, but he knows I can't make that since
they don't grow here. I just recently picked up some Concord juice from his
grandmother in WV, but that won't last long once I make it into Jelly for my
husband. Just sucks that I can't get Concords here. Never even seen them in
the stores.

Thanks very much for the information, I appreciate it!



Are there any crabapple trees in your area? They should be covered with
fruit right now; I'm planning to pick some over at the water dept. this
weekend if nobody beats me to 'em. I still have too much crabapple
jelly leftover from last year, so I may use them to flavor and color
some mead (it's called cyser when you add apple juice to the honey.)
Use all crabapples or a mixture of crabapple juice and regular apple

juice.

[snipped the part about grapes]

I don't know much about making grape jelly, but
(1) you might have better luck with making jam
(2) try finding some wild grapes. It's too bad you can't get Concords,
but what about Muscadines or sour "mustang" grapes?

Best regards,
Bob



  #4 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 02:28 AM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bunny McElwee wrote:
Not that I know of. I've never heard of anyone talking about them and
I've never seen one. I'll ask around and see if anyone has access to them.
In the meantime, I'm still looking for other ways to make Apple Jelly.


As doe the grapes, yes, I do have access to Muscadine and Scuppernog
grapes. I've actually got recipes for Jams for both types, but no Jelly
recipes. My husband only likes Concord, but he knows I can't make that since
they don't grow here. I just recently picked up some Concord juice from his
grandmother in WV, but that won't last long once I make it into Jelly for my
husband. Just sucks that I can't get Concords here. Never even seen them in
the stores.

Thanks very much for the information, I appreciate it!



Check the instruction sheet in the Sure-Jel box and see if there's
instructions for muscadine jelly. IMHO, it tastes better than concord
jelly.

-Bob
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 03:01 AM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "Bunny McElwee"
wrote:

I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in t
he past, with both regular apples as well as a bottled apple
juice. Both turned out like syrup, not jelly, both used Sure
Jell, followed the directions, to no avail. What are the best
type of apples to use for jelly? Most recipes say xx number of
pounds of apples, but they don't say what kind. Some say sour
apples, but do they mean Granny Smith? My grandmothers apple
jelly was always a pinkish/red color, and that would be untrue of
a granny smith. She also says she's always made her jelly from
the skins of red apples, hence the pinkish/red jelly, but can't
remember what kind. Can anyone lead me in the right direction? I
understand Red Delicious is not an acceptable choice since it is
not "sour" enough. Any help would be appreciated.

I've had similar issues with Grape Jelly. My problem is I don't
live in an area that has access to Concords, so I can't use them.
The only access I have is to Red Globes (Do not make jelly, but
make a pretty sickening sweet syrup, much to my dismay) Red
seedless and green grapes. I've also tried to make jelly from
bottled or frozen concentrates, to no avail. They always end up
syrupy. I've not been able to find one that I can use that will
setup firm like jelly.

Thanks in advance for any help!


Bunny, you're doing something wrong and I can't imagine what! Some help
I am, huh? I've never had a failure with it. Is it possible that your
grandmother made crabapple jelly? I use Dolgo crabs and the jelly is a
beautiful ruby red. The Dolgo has a bright red skin and it's not very
large.

AFA grape jelly -- we had a big ol' discussion here about grape jelly a
couple three years ago. I was really curious and through the
grapegrowers association (whatever it's called), learned that when the
leaflet says Concord grapes, it means Concord grapes. When I make my
grape jelly, I use bottled grape juice - Welch's unsweetened, I think.
Still have it in the fridge. It set beautifully. And I've made mint
jelly with bottled apple juice as a base -- it set beautifully. I'd use
a tart, at least, apple for jelly, not a sweet one.
--
-Barb, http://www.jamlady.eboard.com Updated 9-26-05
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 02:02 PM
William R. Watt
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


To make jelly you need three ingredients:
- acid
- pectin
- sugar

Acid fruit is "sour" or "tart". You can't make jelly from sweet eating
apples unless you add some acid like lemon juice. You can make jelly from
"sour" cooking apples or crabapples. The skin contains lots of pectin so
you leave the skin on when mashing up the apples to extract the juice. The
pectin is released when the mash is heated so it has to be brought to a
boil and simmered which also softens the apples so they can be mashed. The
harder the apples the more pectin they contain. I gather some green apples
early in the season to extract the juice to add to other fruit which don't
have enough pectin to make jelly by themselves.

Which brings us to grapes. Wild grapes are sour and contain acid but the
one's I gather don't contain enough pectin to jell so I add some apple
juice. You can also buy commercial pectin at the supermarket and add that
instead.

You can find out all about the chemistry of jelly on the internet.
You read what I learned about it on my website (see below) under "Food".
--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
William R Watt National Capital FreeNet Ottawa's free community network
homepage: www.ncf.ca/~ag384/top.htm
warning: non-FreeNet email must have "notspam" in subject or it's returned
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 04:05 PM
~patches~
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Bunny McElwee wrote:
I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in t he
past, with both regular apples as well as a bottled apple juice. Both turned
out like syrup, not jelly, both used Sure Jell, followed the directions, to
no avail. What are the best type of apples to use for jelly? Most recipes
say xx number of pounds of apples, but they don't say what kind. Some say
sour apples, but do they mean Granny Smith? My grandmothers apple jelly was
always a pinkish/red color, and that would be untrue of a granny smith. She
also says she's always made her jelly from the skins of red apples, hence
the pinkish/red jelly, but can't remember what kind. Can anyone lead me in
the right direction? I understand Red Delicious is not an acceptable choice
since it is not "sour" enough. Any help would be appreciated.


I've had good luck with a variety called L-star. I've made applesauce,
applepie filling and will be using them for pectin. I would think they
would make lovely apple juice. IMO granny smith and red delicious are
not near as good varieties as they used to be. I always used granny
smiths for pies but find the L-star much nicer. It is a tart smaller
apple with a yellowish to red blush. The fruit is nice and firm.

I've had similar issues with Grape Jelly. My problem is I don't live in
an area that has access to Concords, so I can't use them. The only access I
have is to Red Globes (Do not make jelly, but make a pretty sickening sweet
syrup, much to my dismay) Red seedless and green grapes. I've also tried to
make jelly from bottled or frozen concentrates, to no avail. They always end
up syrupy. I've not been able to find one that I can use that will setup
firm like jelly.

Thanks in advance for any help!

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 05:15 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , ~patches~
wrote:

Bunny McElwee wrote:
I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in

(snip)
I've had good luck with a variety called L-star. I've made
applesauce, applepie filling and will be using them for pectin. I
would think they would make lovely apple juice. IMO granny smith and
red delicious are not near as good varieties as they used to be. I
always used granny smiths for pies but find the L-star much nicer.
It is a tart smaller apple with a yellowish to red blush. The fruit
is nice and firm.


Have you run across Honey Crisps? Fabulous apple! Developed at my U of
MN. About $11 for half a peck around here!! Lor, they're good, though!
--
-Barb, http://www.jamlady.eboard.com Updated 9-26-05
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 05:58 PM
~patches~
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Melba's Jammin' wrote:

In article , ~patches~
wrote:


Bunny McElwee wrote:

I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in


(snip)

I've had good luck with a variety called L-star. I've made
applesauce, applepie filling and will be using them for pectin. I
would think they would make lovely apple juice. IMO granny smith and
red delicious are not near as good varieties as they used to be. I
always used granny smiths for pies but find the L-star much nicer.
It is a tart smaller apple with a yellowish to red blush. The fruit
is nice and firm.



Have you run across Honey Crisps? Fabulous apple! Developed at my U of
MN. About $11 for half a peck around here!! Lor, they're good, though!


No I haven't run across Honey Crisps. I pay $8 for firsts, $5 for
seconds for a half bushel and they are cheaper if you pick your own but
ladders and I don't agree I'm just a tad accident prone and don't
need anything else bunged up this year. Are they a tart good cooking
apple? I'm always on the lookout for other varieties since they've
messed with the granny smith. The L-stars are very good for cooking
with. You should taste the Apple Maple Jam I just made. Dang that
stuff is really good! With the cooler weather I'll be making apple
bread using L-stars. I find they keep the shape better and that's what
you want in apple bread - nice chunks of apples
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 06:43 PM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

~patches~ wrote:
Melba's Jammin' wrote:

In article , ~patches~
wrote:


Bunny McElwee wrote:

I would like to make some juice for Apple Jelly. I've tried in



(snip)

I've had good luck with a variety called L-star. I've made
applesauce, applepie filling and will be using them for pectin. I
would think they would make lovely apple juice. IMO granny smith and
red delicious are not near as good varieties as they used to be. I
always used granny smiths for pies but find the L-star much nicer.
It is a tart smaller apple with a yellowish to red blush. The fruit
is nice and firm.




Have you run across Honey Crisps? Fabulous apple! Developed at my U
of MN. About $11 for half a peck around here!! Lor, they're good,
though!



No I haven't run across Honey Crisps. I pay $8 for firsts, $5 for
seconds for a half bushel and they are cheaper if you pick your own but
ladders and I don't agree I'm just a tad accident prone and don't
need anything else bunged up this year. Are they a tart good cooking
apple? I'm always on the lookout for other varieties since they've
messed with the granny smith. The L-stars are very good for cooking
with. You should taste the Apple Maple Jam I just made. Dang that
stuff is really good! With the cooler weather I'll be making apple
bread using L-stars. I find they keep the shape better and that's what
you want in apple bread - nice chunks of apples



I bought a 10 pound bag of Honey Crisp seconds for $10 last weekend and
I've been eating them. I picked thru the bags and got one that had a
lot of large apples in it, and not very many with brown spots. I have a
mature Honey Crisp tree, but it has started blooming only every other
year. Last year it bloomed so much it looked like a white flowering
crabapple tree, and it took me a while to figure out where than faint
rose smell was coming from. So this year, no apples.

I wouldn't use honeycrisp apples for jelly even if they weren't so
expensive. They are too sweet and juicy. A firm tart apple would be a
better choice.

The Honey Golds were not out yet. I'll buy a half a bushel of Honey
Gold seconds (should be $5) for canning, baking, etc.

I've found that if I slice the apples and dip them in a Campden tablet
solution, they don't turn brown and I can store a big bowl of them in
the fridge and they stay pretty and white until the last of them finally
rot 2 weeks later. I used to send apple slices to school in DD's
lunches. One of the mom's (who was convinced her little darling was
allergic to *everything*, despite evidence to the contrary) asked me how
I kept the apple slices fresh. The look on her face was priceless when
I told her I dip them in bisulfite solution. :-)

Best regards,
Bob
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 06:53 PM
commercialcanner
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If you like a tart apple for cooking look for the Boskoop. I think the
spelling is correct. These are perhaps the ugliest fruit ever to be
seen, huge and knobby but they do not get pithy and will knock your
socks off with tartness and flavor.CC

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 07:00 PM
Dianna Visek
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I know it isn't quite the same, but I've had good luck using cider. I
steep herbs in it and then make an opaque jelly. (It's not jam since
there are no pieces of fruit.)

Regards, Dianna
_______________________________________________
To reply, please remove "fluff" from my address.
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 28-09-2005, 07:10 PM
William R. Watt
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Up until just after WWII they used to grow lots of different varieties of
apples on the Eperimental Farm here in Ottawa. I didn't live here then but
I worked in the Research Branch later and have seen harvest photos
complete with teams of horses - apples for cooking, apples for eating,
apples for shipping, apples for storing (in wooden barrels), apples for
cider, early apples, late apples, all kinds of apples.

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
William R Watt National Capital FreeNet Ottawa's free community network
homepage: www.ncf.ca/~ag384/top.htm
warning: non-FreeNet email must have "notspam" in subject or it's returned
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 29-09-2005, 05:34 PM
David J. Braunegg
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If you let an apple tree overbear one year, the next year you can get little
or nothing. This can become an ongoing cycle. You can break this cycle by
culling fruit very early on in the year.

My apologies if you already knew this.

Dave

"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
...
I have a mature Honey Crisp tree, but it has started blooming only every
other year. Last year it bloomed so much it looked like a white flowering
crabapple tree, and it took me a while to figure out where than faint rose
smell was coming from. So this year, no apples.



  #15 (permalink)  
Old 29-09-2005, 05:40 PM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I assumed that was the case and I plan to thin the fruit severely next
year to try to break the cycle. Thanks for confirming this.

-Bob


David J. Braunegg wrote:

If you let an apple tree overbear one year, the next year you can get little
or nothing. This can become an ongoing cycle. You can break this cycle by
culling fruit very early on in the year.

My apologies if you already knew this.

Dave

"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...

...
I have a mature Honey Crisp tree, but it has started blooming only every
other year. Last year it bloomed so much it looked like a white flowering
crabapple tree, and it took me a while to figure out where than faint rose
smell was coming from. So this year, no apples.




 




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