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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Freezing bok choy?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 23-05-2011, 03:44 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 33
Default Freezing bok choy?

I've been growing some dwarf bok choy in the garden this spring, and
have been enjoying it, but now I've got more than I can use ready for
harvest.

I've looked in the latest BBB and Ball Home Preserving (sounds like a
title of a repair guide) book, but neither mentions bok choy. Since
there is more than just greens involved (the white stalk portions of
the plant) I don't know if the directions for greens would be quite
the right thing either.

Any experience with bok choy out there? Or any ideas for how to handle
it for successful freezing?

TIA.

Nyssa, whose garden is promising to be a good one this year after two
years of marauding snow geese and drought

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 23-05-2011, 05:50 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,186
Default Freezing bok choy?

On 5/23/2011 9:44 AM, Nyssa wrote:
I've been growing some dwarf bok choy in the garden this spring, and
have been enjoying it, but now I've got more than I can use ready for
harvest.

I've looked in the latest BBB and Ball Home Preserving (sounds like a
title of a repair guide) book, but neither mentions bok choy. Since
there is more than just greens involved (the white stalk portions of
the plant) I don't know if the directions for greens would be quite
the right thing either.

Any experience with bok choy out there? Or any ideas for how to handle
it for successful freezing?

TIA.

Nyssa, whose garden is promising to be a good one this year after two
years of marauding snow geese and drought

The only way I've seen anyone preserve bok choy is by dehydrating it and
then rehydrating it when needed in soups and stews. Doesn't freeze well,
doesn't can in a jar well. Best eaten fresh or take the excess to the
farmers market to sell or give to the neighbors.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 23-05-2011, 07:41 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 33
Default Freezing bok choy?

George Shirley wrote:

On 5/23/2011 9:44 AM, Nyssa wrote:
I've been growing some dwarf bok choy in the garden this spring, and
have been enjoying it, but now I've got more than I can use ready for
harvest.

I've looked in the latest BBB and Ball Home Preserving (sounds like a
title of a repair guide) book, but neither mentions bok choy. Since
there is more than just greens involved (the white stalk portions of
the plant) I don't know if the directions for greens would be quite
the right thing either.

Any experience with bok choy out there? Or any ideas for how to handle
it for successful freezing?

TIA.

Nyssa, whose garden is promising to be a good one this year after two
years of marauding snow geese and drought

The only way I've seen anyone preserve bok choy is by dehydrating it and
then rehydrating it when needed in soups and stews. Doesn't freeze well,
doesn't can in a jar well. Best eaten fresh or take the excess to the
farmers market to sell or give to the neighbors.


Thanks for the information, George.

I've already loaded one neighbor down with as much as she can use
(it was a new vegetable for her and I'm glad she likes it so much), and
the other refuses to try it. No farmers market around here either.

If I get desperate, I guess I can drag out my little-used dehydrador
and give it a try. I usually use bok choy steamed or stir fried or
fresh in salads, so soups would be a new adventure. Any hints on prep
or time in the dehydrator?

My broccoli is coming all at once too. At least I know I can successfully
freeze some of that. I guess a crawl up into my hot attic to get my
blanching pot down is in order. Mmmm I think I'll wait until early
tomorrow morning when it should be cooler.

Nyssa, who is so glad to have a problem of too much this year instead
of either not enough or none at all

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 23-05-2011, 07:55 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,186
Default Freezing bok choy?

On 5/23/2011 1:41 PM, Nyssa wrote:
George Shirley wrote:

On 5/23/2011 9:44 AM, Nyssa wrote:
I've been growing some dwarf bok choy in the garden this spring, and
have been enjoying it, but now I've got more than I can use ready for
harvest.

I've looked in the latest BBB and Ball Home Preserving (sounds like a
title of a repair guide) book, but neither mentions bok choy. Since
there is more than just greens involved (the white stalk portions of
the plant) I don't know if the directions for greens would be quite
the right thing either.

Any experience with bok choy out there? Or any ideas for how to handle
it for successful freezing?

TIA.

Nyssa, whose garden is promising to be a good one this year after two
years of marauding snow geese and drought

The only way I've seen anyone preserve bok choy is by dehydrating it and
then rehydrating it when needed in soups and stews. Doesn't freeze well,
doesn't can in a jar well. Best eaten fresh or take the excess to the
farmers market to sell or give to the neighbors.


Thanks for the information, George.

I've already loaded one neighbor down with as much as she can use
(it was a new vegetable for her and I'm glad she likes it so much), and
the other refuses to try it. No farmers market around here either.

If I get desperate, I guess I can drag out my little-used dehydrador
and give it a try. I usually use bok choy steamed or stir fried or
fresh in salads, so soups would be a new adventure. Any hints on prep
or time in the dehydrator?

My broccoli is coming all at once too. At least I know I can successfully
freeze some of that. I guess a crawl up into my hot attic to get my
blanching pot down is in order. Mmmm I think I'll wait until early
tomorrow morning when it should be cooler.

Nyssa, who is so glad to have a problem of too much this year instead
of either not enough or none at all

Probably have to keep an eye on it while drying. I do that with a lot of
herbs such as parsley, leaf celery, dill, etc. When it feels dry to the
touch without any give to it it is generally ready. I haven't done bok
choy in years as, like you, a little seed goes a very long way and just
how much stir fry can two people eat.

Once dehydrated I store them in airtight jars or containers and just
grab a handful and toss into whatever I'm cooking that looks like it
could use it. Good luck.

We're in drought conditions here, Big Muddy is sending tons of water
down to the Gulf but no rain is falling here and no drainage water is
coming our way. City has us on watering restrictions right now, possibly
will turn us loose on the 25th. Seems one of larger water mains burst
and partially drained the three gravity towers we have in our city.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 24-05-2011, 12:37 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 11,870
Default Freezing bok choy?

In article , Nyssa
wrote:

I've been growing some dwarf bok choy in the garden this spring, and
have been enjoying it, but now I've got more than I can use ready for
harvest.

I've looked in the latest BBB and Ball Home Preserving (sounds like a
title of a repair guide) book, but neither mentions bok choy. Since
there is more than just greens involved (the white stalk portions of
the plant) I don't know if the directions for greens would be quite
the right thing either.

Any experience with bok choy out there? Or any ideas for how to handle
it for successful freezing?

TIA.

Nyssa, whose garden is promising to be a good one this year after two
years of marauding snow geese and drought


If there is no info, Nyssa, it is likely because it's not recommended
for frozen or canned storage. :-( OTOH, if you trimmed the white
rib out, rinsed and dried the leaves and froze them on a cookie sheet
(loose) and put them into a plastic bag for freezer storage, they
*might* be okay for a stir-fry, as long as you don't expect them to be
crisp or anything.

--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
"Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
http://web.me.com/barbschaller
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 24-05-2011, 04:42 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 266
Default Freezing bok choy?

Nyssa wrote:
I've been growing some dwarf bok choy in the garden this spring, and
have been enjoying it, but now I've got more than I can use ready for
harvest.

I've looked in the latest BBB and Ball Home Preserving (sounds like a
title of a repair guide) book, but neither mentions bok choy. Since
there is more than just greens involved (the white stalk portions of
the plant) I don't know if the directions for greens would be quite
the right thing either.

Any experience with bok choy out there? Or any ideas for how to handle
it for successful freezing?


none other than i know i like to eat it.


TIA.

Nyssa, whose garden is promising to be a good one this year after two
years of marauding snow geese and drought




various ideas come to mind:

slice it up and put it in a mix
of water, sugar and vinegar. add
onions or whatever else you might
like. keeps in the fridge for a
while. becomes the sweet and sour
component of many other dishes or
enjoyed uncooked and eaten crunchy.

maybe it could be pickled? i've
never pickled cabbage as i like
saurkraut, but perhaps it would
come out ok? if blanched lightly
and then processed you might keep
some texture and crispness.

can you make saurkraut out of it?

do you like kimchee?

isn't it used in eggrolls? i
know those freeze ok.


songbird
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 24-05-2011, 04:19 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 3,400
Default Freezing bok choy?

songbird wrote:

isn't it used in eggrolls? i know those freeze ok.


Eggrolls use cabbage. That's a general classification not a specific
vegitable so it would include bok choy if that's the cabbage class
veggie on hand. Eggrolls are cooked before freezing - Not sure if that
effects the original question.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 24-05-2011, 09:58 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 4,620
Default Freezing bok choy?

that is an excellent idea if you like eggrolls, not only do you use up the
vegetable but you have prepared food for easy snacks, Lee
"Doug Freyburger" wrote in message
...
songbird wrote:

isn't it used in eggrolls? i know those freeze ok.


Eggrolls use cabbage. That's a general classification not a specific
vegitable so it would include bok choy if that's the cabbage class
veggie on hand. Eggrolls are cooked before freezing - Not sure if that
effects the original question.



 




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