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Preserving (rec.food.preserving) Devoted to the discussion of recipes, equipment, and techniques of food preservation. Techniques that should be discussed in this forum include canning, freezing, dehydration, pickling, smoking, salting, and distilling.

Brandied tangerines



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 01:11 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

It's tangerine crop time again and I'm at a loss for what to do with
them. I was thinking of making brandied tangerines to preserve them.

What I was thinking of doing is:

Peel the tangerines and place in large glass jars. I can't get canning
jars, but I can get the ones that look like the old bail sealed ones with
rubber gaskets. They are air tight, but not heat proof.

Slice peels into strips, place in pan and cover with water. Bring to
a boil and and add sugar. Stir until dissolved. Remove from heat and
allow to cool so that it will not break the glass.

Add peel, sugar suryp and brandy to the tangerines in the jars. Seal.
Tap on table to dislodge air bubbles.

Age for a few months at room temp (60f until end of April), then hotter.
I can also keep them in a refigerator (35-40F).

What I have no idea of is the proportions of water to brandy, and
sugar to water. I'd also prefer to use 95% grain alcohol instead of
brandy, it's 2/3 of the price. Maybe add wine or use the brandy as
flavoring, and the grain alcohol for preserving?

Thanks in advance,

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default Brandied tangerines

"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" wrote in message
...
It's tangerine crop time again and I'm at a loss for what to do with
them. I was thinking of making brandied tangerines to preserve them.

What I was thinking of doing is:
Peel the tangerines and place in large glass jars. I can't get canning
jars, but I can get the ones that look like the old bail sealed ones with
rubber gaskets. They are air tight, but not heat proof.

Slice peels into strips, place in pan and cover with water. Bring to
a boil and and add sugar. Stir until dissolved. Remove from heat and
allow to cool so that it will not break the glass.

Add peel, sugar suryp and brandy to the tangerines in the jars. Seal.
Tap on table to dislodge air bubbles.

Age for a few months at room temp (60f until end of April), then hotter.
I can also keep them in a refigerator (35-40F).

What I have no idea of is the proportions of water to brandy, and
sugar to water. I'd also prefer to use 95% grain alcohol instead of
brandy, it's 2/3 of the price. Maybe add wine or use the brandy as
flavoring, and the grain alcohol for preserving?

Thanks in advance,

Geoff.

This recipe of yours sounds interesting. Here in the USofA, we'll being
paying for citrus with our firstborn children - huge percent of California
crop ruined.
I've made lots of brandied cherries, pears, apples & blueberries. I made
the pear with apricot brandy and they were fab! I like the apples with
applejack. I found that grain alcohol has a very harsh taste - I wouldn't
use it. Use the brandy unless you're making barrels full, it will be worth
it in the end. Even cheap brandy might be okay. Or at the very least, use a
good quality vodka. And I would cook the peels gently until tender, in case
anybody gets the idea that one is supposed to eat them. And put that jar in
a bowl in case it oozes.
The Ball Blue book recipe for brandied pears is a good one:
10 pounds pears
4 cups water
6 cups sugar
3 cups brandy
Wash, peel, halve & core pears. Combine sugar & water, bring to boil. Cook
pears one layer at a time just until tender about 5 min. Place cooked pears
in a bowl, set aside. Continue cooking syrup until thickened, about 15 min.
Remove from heat, add brandy.
Note: use white brandy for clear syrup; however, any brandy will flavor the
fruit.
More directions for BWB processing (15 min per qt.)
HTH,
Edrena


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 06:25 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 988
Default Brandied tangerines

Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

It's tangerine crop time again and I'm at a loss for what to do with
them. I was thinking of making brandied tangerines to preserve them.


I don't have the proportions either, but I believe it involves a
several-day process of soaking in a syrup and increasing the amount of
sugar in the syrup each day.

B/
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 07:30 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

Brian Mailman wrote:

I don't have the proportions either, but I believe it involves a
several-day process of soaking in a syrup and increasing the amount of
sugar in the syrup each day.


Ok, thanks.

Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 07:51 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

The Joneses wrote:
Thanks.

This recipe of yours sounds interesting. Here in the USofA, we'll being
paying for citrus with our firstborn children - huge percent of California
crop ruined.


We had snow here too, unusual, once every 5-7 years. It lasted a day
and was gone. We lost most of our crop in the north last August due
to rockets from Lebanon, something I hope you never have to experience.
Citrus fruit were gone from the markets for several months.

I've made lots of brandied cherries, pears, apples & blueberries. I made
the pear with apricot brandy and they were fab! I like the apples with
applejack. I found that grain alcohol has a very harsh taste - I wouldn't
use it. Use the brandy unless you're making barrels full, it will be worth
it in the end. Even cheap brandy might be okay. Or at the very least, use a
good quality vodka.


It was simple economics. I checked the price I paid and in dollars (for 750ml):
(approximate)

95% Grain alcohol $4 19 NIS (new Isaeli sheckels) @ 4.25 = $1
Cheap Brandy/vodka $8 38 NIS
"decent vodka" $11 50+ NIS

If I water the grain alcohol down with filtered water to 40 proof, it
equals $1 a fifth. Watered down, would it make that much of a difference?

And I would cook the peels gently until tender, in case
anybody gets the idea that one is supposed to eat them.


I eat them in Chinese food. Many people do and don't know it. If you go into
a chinese grocery, you find dried tangerine peels, but no dried orange peels.
Think about that the next time you eat Orange chicken. :-)

However, no one else in the house will eat it. Hot and sweet is not a
combination that anyone else in my family likes.

And put that jar in a bowl in case it oozes.


Good idea. I had not thought of it.

The Ball Blue book recipe for brandied pears is a good one:
10 pounds pears
4 cups water
6 cups sugar
3 cups brandy


Sounds good. I don't have a BBB, they are NOT available here. A friend is
scouting second hand sales in Colorado for me, she will probably bring
one for me in the Summer.

I was hoping she would get lucky and find one of each edition, I know,
dream on.....

Wash, peel, halve & core pears. Combine sugar & water, bring to boil. Cook
pears one layer at a time just until tender about 5 min. Place cooked pears
in a bowl, set aside. Continue cooking syrup until thickened, about 15 min.
Remove from heat, add brandy.
Note: use white brandy for clear syrup; however, any brandy will flavor the
fruit.


Simple enough, another recipe I found on line for generic brandied fruit
said one pound of sugar for each pound of fruit. Six cups of sugar is about
2.5 to 3 pounds, a lot less.

More directions for BWB processing (15 min per qt.)


That might be the difference. If I want to not process it (lack of
suitable containers) then I need more sugar.

HTH,


It sure does, thanks,

Geoff.



--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 988
Default Brandied tangerines

Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

Brian Mailman wrote:

I don't have the proportions either, but I believe it involves a
several-day process of soaking in a syrup and increasing the amount of
sugar in the syrup each day.


Ok, thanks.


I believe the science of it is that eventually the water is forced out
of the citrus, thus "drying" it with sugar.

B/
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2007, 09:46 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default Brandied tangerines

"Geoffrey S. Mendelson" wrote in message
...
The Joneses wrote:



It was simple economics. I checked the price I paid and in dollars (for
750ml):
(approximate)
95% Grain alcohol $4 19 NIS (new Isaeli sheckels) @ 4.25 = $1
Cheap Brandy/vodka $8 38 NIS
"decent vodka" $11 50+ NIS
If I water the grain alcohol down with filtered water to 40 proof, it
equals $1 a fifth. Watered down, would it make that much of a difference?


I think so. Make it half & half? Use port instead? That's about 40%, but
pretty strong flavor. Kind of difference between apple cider vinegar or
nice wine vinegar and the white grain vinegar.

And I would cook the peels gently ...

I eat them in Chinese food. Many people do and don't know it. If you go
into
a chinese grocery, you find dried tangerine peels, but no dried orange
peels.
Think about that the next time you eat Orange chicken. :-)
However, no one else in the house will eat it. Hot and sweet is not a
combination that anyone else in my family likes.


I like that too! And it just means more for us!

Sounds good. I don't have a BBB, they are NOT available here. A friend is
scouting second hand sales in Colorado for me, she will probably bring
one for me in the Summer.
I was hoping she would get lucky and find one of each edition, I know,
dream on.....


That's the book. Let us know what you would like and one of us like me
can ship it, probably cheaper than the company. Most companies charge
arms and legs for shipping. Do you have _Putting Food By_? Both these
texts are very informative. And I have some new copies of Joy of
Pickling which ran me about $12US a few years ago. And about
$5 postage for that size book. I looked it up. Consider it an investment.

Wash, peel, halve & core pears. Combine sugar & water, bring to boil.
Cook
pears one layer at a time just until tender about 5 min. Place cooked
pears
in a bowl, set aside. Continue cooking syrup until thickened, about 15
min.
Remove from heat, add brandy.
Note: use white brandy for clear syrup; however, any brandy will flavor
the
fruit.


Simple enough, another recipe I found on line for generic brandied fruit
said one pound of sugar for each pound of fruit. Six cups of sugar is
about
2.5 to 3 pounds, a lot less.

More directions for BWB processing (15 min per qt.)


That might be the difference. If I want to not process it (lack of
suitable containers) then I need more sugar.
It sure does, thanks,
Geoff.


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 26-01-2007, 12:21 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

The Joneses wrote:

I think so. Make it half & half? Use port instead? That's about 40%, but
pretty strong flavor. Kind of difference between apple cider vinegar or
nice wine vinegar and the white grain vinegar.


I ended up with brandy. The guy that supplies me with groceries did not
have any and could not get it for this week. So I took two fifths
of brandy instead.

Port is also not an option. I probably could get something local to
replace it, I'll have to look. Whatever it is, it won't be cheap.


However, no one else in the house will eat it. Hot and sweet is not a
combination that anyone else in my family likes.


I like that too! And it just means more for us!


Yes, but it hardly makes it worth it for me to cook it. About once a week
a make a dish for myself that no one eats. My middle son (11) complains
the loudest and often eats it anyway.

That's the book. Let us know what you would like and one of us like me
can ship it, probably cheaper than the company. Most companies charge
arms and legs for shipping.


That's for sure. Amazon won't sell used books overseas, and the forwarding
agencies are expensive. Paying for things is difficult, we don't
have PayPal and the Post Office stopped selling money orders. They now
use Western Union which has a $25 minimum fee.

Do you have _Putting Food By_?


It's one of my favorites. I lost my copy when I moved here and my wife
found a used copy here.

Both these
texts are very informative. And I have some new copies of Joy of
Pickling which ran me about $12US a few years ago. And about
$5 postage for that size book. I looked it up. Consider it an investment.


Thanks, email me off list, and I'll try to work something out. I appriciate
the offer, even if it never happens.

While I was cleaning the other day, I found a box of 12 Ball jars,
4 of them 1 pint, the rest 1/2 pint. Now all I need to do is to get someone
to stick some bands and lids in their luggage. :-)

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 30-01-2007, 05:51 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

Anny Middon wrote:
You might also try abebooks.com. You can get a copy of the BB for 2.41USD
from a bookseller in the UK who says they ship worldwide.

You pay through Abebooks with a credit card. I've bought many books from
them, and have been very pleased with the service.


Thansk, Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 31-01-2007, 07:21 AM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
It's tangerine crop time again and I'm at a loss for what to do with
them. I was thinking of making brandied tangerines to preserve them.


Contining......

Like all great plans, it did not quite work out like I had planned. I
did not have enough jars, we could not find the gaskets, and the guy
that sells me my groceries did not have any grain alcohol.

So here's what I did anyway:

Tangerines:

I had two one gallon jars, in each I placed:

1 kilo sugar. (too much)
2 kilo tangerine segments.
1 liter brandy.

peels and liquid to fill, see below.

I sealed them with plastic wrap and rubber bands.

They are now aging in a refrigerator at near freezing.

The peels were cooked until soft in water.

I had a smaller (1/2 gallon?) jar. I filled it with peels. 1/2 kilo
of sugar and 1/2 liter of brandy. Filled to the top with the liquid.

I took the rest of the peels, 2 kilo of sugar and the remaining liquid.
I cooked them until the water was (almost) gone and I had canndied peels
and a thick suryp. I placed them in mason jars (no lids) and sealed with
plastic and rubber bands. They have sat overnight and have solidified.
Into the refigerator for them too.

I may have a lead on the lids for the peels/jelly. If I get them, should
I seal them, and BWB them? Here the water temp would only be 204F, not
212F. Or should I just leave them in the refrigerator?

I know there is too much sugar, because it has not dissolved.

Geoff.
--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 31-01-2007, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 988
Default Brandied tangerines

Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

I know there is too much sugar, because it has not dissolved.


Patience.

In making cordials, involving dried fruit, vodka, and sugar it sometimes
takes a few weeks for the sugar to dissolve.

B/
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 31-01-2007, 09:20 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 1,039
Default Brandied tangerines

"Brian Mailman" wrote in message
...
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
I know there is too much sugar, because it has not dissolved.


Patience.
In making cordials, involving dried fruit, vodka, and sugar it sometimes
takes a few weeks for the sugar to dissolve. B/


In making candied ginger, the recipe I use recommends a very small amount
of corn syrup. From the TV shows, it was explained that the syrup is a
different kind of sweet and its molecular makeup, even in a tablespoon
amount, would keep regular sugar from crystallizing in the final product.
Worth considering anyway. I actually like my candied ginger "crispy."
Mostlyyyyy. Damn cat. Supervising my computer time again.
Edrena
"Cat fur - the Other condiment!"


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 31-01-2007, 10:00 PM posted to rec.food.preserving
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Posts: 146
Default Brandied tangerines

The Joneses wrote:
In making candied ginger, the recipe I use recommends a very small amount
of corn syrup.


I never thought of that. I think it's available here.

Thanks, Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
IL Voice: (07)-7424-1667 Fax ONLY: 972-2-648-1443 U.S. Voice: 1-215-821-1838
Visit my 'blog at
http://geoffstechno.livejournal.com/
 




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