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Historic (rec.food.historic) Discussing and discovering how food was made and prepared way back when--From ancient times down until (& possibly including or even going slightly beyond) the times when industrial revolution began to change our lives.

what is hook cheese ???



 
 
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2003, 07:16 AM
anita kean
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Default what is hook cheese ???

On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 15:16:38 GMT, Frogleg wrote:
On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 01:07:05 GMT, Cymru Llewes
wrote:

On Sat, 13 Dec 2003 14:56:34 +0100, Alf Christophersen wrote:

On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 22:13:45 -0600, Alan wrote:

Now, my question: Is ANY cheese naturally orange in color?

Don't think so. Even cheddar made here in Norway is orange-yellowish
in color. Do not know what they use for coloring. Should occur on the
declaration, so maybe I'll check tomorrow.



The herb lady's bedstraw is in the madder family, and
produces an orangey red colour.

Entry from a herb book I have, The Complete Book on Herbs and Spices,
by Loewenfeld and Back:

(quote)

Lady's Bedstraw
Botanical name: Galium verum
Family: Rubiaceae

Lady's bedstraw is an unusual plant in that it has the property
of acting like rennet in curdling milk. It was used long ago in Tuscany
to give sheep and goat's cheese a sweeter taste. In Britan it was used in the
making of the famous Cheshire cheese, and said to be the reason for the
superior quality of the cheese.
In the sixteenth century the herb was called 'cheese renning' and the name
Galium comes from the Greek word 'gala' meaning milk.
The English name comes from its use as bedding in former times.
One of the Madder family of plants, lady's bedstraw roots were once used to
procure a red dye.

(end of quote)

Ads
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2003, 04:13 PM
Olivers
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Default Coloring margerine

muttered....



We had that stuff when I was a kid, but I don't think the real reason
was the war. At the time, the dairy producers didn't want margarine
on the market. While they weren't able to keep it off the market,
they were able to keep it from being yellow, like butter.

Hence, the dye 'pill'.

This was in Illinois in the middle-to-late '40s.

I don't recall it long after the war in Texas, but margarine's growing
popularity (in no small part due to butter rationing), kept the dye pellets
and "white" margarine alive in some dairy state politics for years after,
IIRC Wisconsin?).

TMO

  #18 (permalink)  
Old 15-12-2003, 08:58 PM
Opinicus
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Default Coloring margerine

Olivers said:

I don't recall it long after the war in Texas, but margarine's growing
popularity (in no small part due to butter rationing), kept the dye
pellets and "white" margarine alive in some dairy state politics for
years after, IIRC Wisconsin?).


My own experience with it (in 1952) was in Washington. I suppose they have a
cow or two there.

--
Bob
Kanyak's Doghouse
http://kanyak.com

  #19 (permalink)  
Old 16-12-2003, 09:17 PM
Dr Pepper
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Default what is hook cheese ???

I remember in the WWII years when I would knead the oleo and the red
coloring to make it look like butter. I never really liked it after
that, I prefered butter, but we couldn't get it during the war.

I've read that wartime (WWI) oleo
came with dye pellets to knead in to make the (presumably white) fat
look more like butter. Are people strange, or what? :-)


  #20 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2003, 04:53 AM
Dennis Rekuta
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Default Coloring margerine


We had that stuff when I was a kid, but I don't think the real reason
was the war. At the time, the dairy producers didn't want margarine
on the market. While they weren't able to keep it off the market,
they were able to keep it from being yellow, like butter.

Hence, the dye 'pill'.

This was in Illinois in the middle-to-late '40s.


I don't recall it long after the war in Texas, but margarine's growing
popularity (in no small part due to butter rationing), kept the dye pellets
and "white" margarine alive in some dairy state politics for years after,
IIRC Wisconsin?).

TMO

AFAIK, it is still illegal to sell margarine that is coloured like
butter in the province of Quebec. It has to be either an orange yellow
shade or a white shade. They also happen to produce the milk for about
50% of the dairy products made in Canada. Sounds like Wisconsin.

It wasn't until the mid 1980's that all of the margarine brands in
Ontario lost that orange yellow hue and stepped into the second half of
the 20th century.

The last time I saw the white margarine in the plastic bag with the
colour pellet was in cottage country north of Toronto sometime between
1968 and 1970. That was also dairy country around there as well. My
grandmother and my mother both laughed and had to show us how to mix it
up. They both called it oleo margarine.
Dennis

  #21 (permalink)  
Old 02-01-2004, 12:40 AM
Mike Dilger
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Default what is hook cheese ???


Cymru Llewes wrote:

I suppose that a cow that was fed just carrots would produce an orange
cheese. Anyone with a cow willing to test the hypothesis?


Carrots, like cheddar cheese, didn't used to be orange. They were cross
bred by the House of Orange in Holland. Original carrots are usually
purple or white.

-Mike

  #22 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2010, 09:27 AM
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Default

You guys might all be wrong about the answer to this post. Hook's cheese is a company that has been in business for over 35 years. I don't think the author was referring to "Hoop" cheese, even though all the information posted is very interesting.. I believe he/she is trying to find out more about hook cheese...a company located in Wisconsin.
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2011, 08:38 PM
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i use always chadder cheese for pizza
it is best type of cheese
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2011, 10:17 AM
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Hook cheese is company producing cheese. The reason behind the company name hook cheese is that the company is started by the Tony Hook in 1970s at Barneveld. Tony and July had started this cheese company.
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2011, 08:08 AM
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I like cheese so much
it is my favorite.so I like also pizza with full of cheese.
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