A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » General Cooking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Chislic, anyone?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 03:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone?

It sounds pretty vulgar but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating. She said it is a Midwest thing. I said I am a Minnesotan.
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 6-25-06; Happy Birthday to Me
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 05:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone?

In article ,
projectile vomit chick wrote:

I have lived in South Dakota, and have never heard of it. How could
she not have known that you are a Minnesotan? Ya'll got those funny
accents like the townspeople in "Fargo" lol...

Have you ever eaten at Schlotzky's Deli up there in Sioux Falls.
Absolutely disgusting.....$7 bucks for a disgusting microwaved Spam
sandwich....never again.



I haven't been here in 40 years. We were hoping for the Tea Steakhouse
in Tea, SD but were told it was sold a few years ago. :-(
I don't do Schlotzsky's, here or anywhere else. Re my accent (and
almost food-related): Bite me. "-)
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 07:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Chislic, anyone?

Oh pshaw, on Wed 05 Jul 2006 07:31:01p, Melba's Jammin' meant to say...

It sounds pretty vulgar but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating. She said it is a Midwest thing. I said I am a Minnesotan.
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?


Nope, but I've never been to South Dakota.

--
Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
_____________________
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 07:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,524
Default Chislic, anyone?

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
It sounds pretty vulgar ...


Yes, it does.

but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating. ...


Somehow it's not surprising that they would equate sautéeing with deep
frying.

She said it is a Midwest thing. I said I am a Minnesotan.
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?


Never heard of it before. Reading rfc is so enlightening..... -aem

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 02:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 68
Default Chislic, anyone?

Melba's Jammin' writes:

It sounds pretty vulgar but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating. She said it is a Midwest thing. I said I am a Minnesotan.
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?


Yeah, I even mentioned it last week in a post. I've only ever seen it
in South Dakota, or at a party here in NH hosted by a South Dakotan.

--
Richard W Kaszeta

http://www.kaszeta.org/rich
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 04:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 239
Default Chislic, anyone?


Melba's Jammin' wrote:
It sounds pretty vulgar but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating. She said it is a Midwest thing. I said I am a Minnesotan.
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?


Oooh Ooooh - now I get to tell my chizlik story.

I have to go to Sioux Falls often on business. One time we're in a
restaurant and spot it on the menu. So, I ask the waitress what it is.
She says, "Well, usually it's beef."

The funny part is that everyone else I asked what it was had exactly
the same answer. Person after person saying, "Well, usually it's
beef." Talk about your herd mentalities. I nearly had to put a gun to
someone's head to get them to describe the dish. My mom grew up 300
miles from there in Minnesota and I'd never heard of it either.

If you're still in Sioux Falls, check out Minerva's for a big splurgy
dinner. There's also a good place downtown called the European cafe
that has Bohemian food.

Susan B.

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 07:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,863
Default Chislic, anyone?

On Wed, 05 Jul 2006 21:31:01 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
wrote:

It sounds pretty vulgar but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating.


Pre-cooked fondue. Yummmm!

Carol
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone?

In article ,
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
(snippage)
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating.


Pre-cooked fondue. Yummmm!

Carol



No kidding! Thing about it is that in the Wiki reference it says
something about the meat bits being cut in no-larger-than-1/2-inch dice.
That is not very large. And for medium-rare in the middle of it sounds
like about 3 seconds in some really hot fat.
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone? + Breakfast Strudel recipe

In article . com,
"sueb" wrote:

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
It sounds pretty vulgar but it was on the menu at Tailgator's Sports Bar
& Grill here in suburban Sioux Falls, SD. I asked the waitress what the
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating. She said it is a Midwest thing. I said I am a Minnesotan.
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?


Oooh Ooooh - now I get to tell my chizlik story.

I have to go to Sioux Falls often on business. One time we're in a
restaurant and spot it on the menu. So, I ask the waitress what it is.
She says, "Well, usually it's beef."

The funny part is that everyone else I asked what it was had exactly
the same answer. Person after person saying, "Well, usually it's
beef." Talk about your herd mentalities. I nearly had to put a gun to
someone's head to get them to describe the dish. My mom grew up 300
miles from there in Minnesota and I'd never heard of it either.

If you're still in Sioux Falls, check out Minerva's for a big splurgy
dinner. There's also a good place downtown called the European cafe
that has Bohemian food.

Susan B.



Too late. We are now back in Meen-a-soh-ta. There's a Minerva's at the
Ramkota in Rancid City where we spent the better part of a week - I
wonder if they're related. Stayed at a brand new Holiday Inn on 90 at
Brandon. The biscuits and gravy were pretty tasty at breakfast. Real
tasty, in fact. We were hoping for a slab o'steak at the Tea
Steakhouse (haven't been there in 40 years) and discovered it's now a
seafood place or something in the middle of nowhere (Nowhere=Tea, SD).
Time marches on: the outlets at the desk in our room were placed above
table height for easy access if you needed to plug in a 'puter or
something. Chris was astounded by that. :-)

Our waitress said that her preference for Chislic is venison.

I was going to find a recipe for biscuits and sausage gravy but at
http://www.walnutgrovebb.com/breakfast.htm found this instead:
Walnut Grove Bed and Breakfast
Breakfast Strudel

Makes 2 Strudels; Total time 45 minutes

1 box (1 lb.) puff pastry dough
2 T unsalted butter
1 cup frozen cubed hash brown potatoes
1 cup red or green bell peppers, seeded and diced
? cup onion, diced
1 cup diced smoked ham (optional)
11 eggs
2 T minced fresh chives
4 oz. cream cheese, softened
2 T sour cream
2 T orange juice
1 egg (for brushing the top)
1 T water
2 T Parmesan cheese, shredded

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit
Thaw pastry according to package directions, about 30 minutes.

Melt butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add
potatoes and saut 5 minutes. Stir in bell pepper and onion, saut another
3 minutes, and then add ham.

Beat with electric mixer eggs, chives, cream cheese, and sour cream. Add
them to the pan and scramble with potato mixture, just until set. Do not
completely cook at this point. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
Turn off heat, stir in juice until blended. Refrigerate eggs while
working with pastry.

Unfold a pastry sheet on a work surface thats been lightly dusted with
flour. Roll pastry lengthwise to 12x10, then transfer to a piece of
parchment paper, cut to fit a baking sheet. Trim pastry; fill with half
the egg mixture down the middle of the pastry sheet. Cut 1 strips on
both sides at a 45 degree angle. Cut off the top and bottom corners.
Fold the flaps inward at both ends, then braid the strips across the
filling overlapping each strip. Repeat with remaining pastry and egg
filling. Lift parchment and strudels onto baking sheets.

Combine the remaining egg and water; brush over top of strudels.
Sprinkle with cheese and bake 20 to 30 minutes, or until golden. Let
cook 5 minutes before slice.

Slice and Serve! (Can use bacon instead of ham and add any favorite
veggies!) Be sure to scramble the eggs just until set they should be a
bit soft. That way, they wont overcook and turn rubbery as theyre baked
inside the pastry. The eggs can be prepared the night before (that is
the reason a little orange juice is added to the eggs. The vitamin C
helps preserve their color.)

--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone?

In article ,
Richard Kaszeta wrote:
She back-pedaled and offered, "Maybe it's a South Dakota thing, then."
Wikipedia agrees with -that-. grin Have you ever heard of it?


Yeah, I even mentioned it last week in a post. I've only ever seen it
in South Dakota, or at a party here in NH hosted by a South Dakotan.



Cripes, I missed that, Rich. Some coincidence.
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Chislic, anyone?

I grew up in SD -- usually used venison for our Chislic -- and light
garlic salt after frying -- absolutely delicious!!! How about Rocky
Mountain Oyters - now that's another treat


Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
(snippage)
heck it is (menu says sautéed sirloin tips) and she described it as
little bits of meat, deep fried, then stuck on toothpicks for dipping
and eating.


Pre-cooked fondue. Yummmm!

Carol



No kidding! Thing about it is that in the Wiki reference it says
something about the meat bits being cut in no-larger-than-1/2-inch dice.
That is not very large. And for medium-rare in the middle of it sounds
like about 3 seconds in some really hot fat.
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 09:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone?

In article .com,
"AZ baby" wrote:

I grew up in SD -- usually used venison for our Chislic -- and light
garlic salt after frying -- absolutely delicious!!! How about Rocky
Mountain Oyters - now that's another treat


I know about Rocky Mtn oysters. Had never heard of Chislic. The
etymology as described in the Wiki reference is interesting if there's
any fact to it. I admit to regretting that I didn't order it.
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2006, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,861
Default Chislic, anyone? + Breakfast Strudel recipe

Melba's Jammin' wrote on 06 Jul 2006 in rec.food.cooking

Stayed at a brand new Holiday Inn on 90 at
Brandon.


Brandon Manitoba?

--
-Alan
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 07-07-2006, 12:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Chislic, anyone? + Breakfast Strudel recipe

In article ,
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:

Melba's Jammin' wrote on 06 Jul 2006 in rec.food.cooking

Stayed at a brand new Holiday Inn on 90 at
Brandon.


Brandon Manitoba?



South Dakota. Does US Interstate 90 go through Manitoba? It's an
East-West thoroughfare through SoDak and points west and I
don't-know-where east of Albert Lea, Meen-a-soh-ta.
--
-Barb
http://jamlady.eboard.com Updated 7-5-06, Pannekoeken
"If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all."
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright ©2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.