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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Least fishy tasting fish?



 
 
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  #46 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 04:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?


"OmManiPadmeOmelet" wrote in message
...
In article 9,
Wayne Boatwright wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Mon 23 Jan 2006 04:38:38a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
BoboBonobo?

Catfish? Ewww. You turn him off of fish forever.

Jill

--Bryan



Food Snob!


Indeed... ;-)
Catfish is delicious either pan fried in spiced cornmeal, or grilled
with a bit of lemon pepper and garlic. ;-d
--
Om.


I love fish, but catfish is one fish that I only eat if my hubby fries it.
I've had it in other places before and to me it just tastes like dirt. I
don't know what Allan does differently, but I can stomach his and his alone.

kili


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  #47 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 04:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?


"Michael "Dog3" Lonergan" wrote in message
...
OmManiPadmeOmelet looking for trouble wrote in
:

In article 9,
Wayne Boatwright wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Mon 23 Jan 2006 04:38:38a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
BoboBonobo?



Food Snob!


Indeed... ;-)
Catfish is delicious either pan fried in spiced cornmeal, or grilled
with a bit of lemon pepper and garlic. ;-d


I don't like catfish either. I don't care for the taste. That's just me
and I am a fish lover. I had catfish nuggets once which I sorta liked.
They were deep fried and I drowned them in hot sauce.

Michael


I'll bet you'd like TFM's then, Michael, 'cause I'm a fish lover and won't
eat any catfish that he didn't cook. Somehow, he gets that "taste" out of
it. A little buttermilk, some cornmeal mix, add some garlic, deep fry, toss
in a lemon wedge and it's good! Since we do catfish nuggets frequently, I
thought I'd try some at the Golden Corral last weekend. You know, I thought
maybe I acquired a taste for it finally. Nope! Oh my God were they awful!
I can only eat them TFM's way; he does it right.

kili


  #48 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 04:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?


"jmcquown" wrote in message
news
BoboBonobo wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
kilikini wrote:
"Gareth" wrote in message
...


To each his own. I love catfish. It's very mild tasting. Takes well to
a
sauce, too.

Catfish Acadian
(replicated after a recipe from Bayou Bar & Grill, Memphis, TN)
2 lb. catfish fillets
seasoned flour
olive oil
butter
diced onions and garlic or shallots
diced bell pepper
diced celery
1/2 c. crawfish tail meat
4 large shrimp, chopped
whole cream
salt & cayenne pepper
Lightly coat the catfish fillets in seasoned flour. Pan fry in olive oil
until lightly browned and tender. Plate and hold in a warm oven.

In another pan, saute the onion and garlic (or shallots) with the bell
pepper and celery in butter until tender. Add the crawfish tail meat and
shrimp and saute until just pink. Stir in some cream; season with salt and

a
little cayenne pepper. Pour this over the catfish and serve.

Serves 4

Jill



Recipe saved, Jill, thanks. Allan will LOVE this!

kili


  #49 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 04:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?


"Michael "Dog3" Lonergan" wrote in message
...
"kilikini" looking for trouble wrote in
:

Maybe I've never had it done right then. I know what you mean by the
"taste" thing. The farm raised is better than the 'caught' catfish but
it's not much better. Years ago we were spending a couple of weeks on

Lake
Sally in Wisconsin. The fishermen/women would toss these huge catfish

back
if they caught one. Said they were bottom feeders and no one would eat
them. Now I like fresh caught perch, trout, blue gill and a couple of
others I can't think of right now. Trout, tilapia, halibut, swordfish are
among my faves. I love a real thick halibut or sword filet off the grill.
Almost tastes like steak.


Yep, I like farm raised better as well.

My fav. fish is (in order): Ahi, Ono, Mahi-Mahi, Onaga (Red Snapper),
Tilapia, Orange Roughy, Halibut, Salmon, Swordfish, U'a (Marlin) & Shark.
What can I get here in Cesspool, Florida? Tilapia. Other than that, most
everything else is stuff I've never heard of, but it's fresh water fish -
which I never cared for anyway.

kili


  #50 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 07:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

In article ,
Gareth wrote:
I never liked the taste of fish when I was younger, but I think it is
time I tried it again. What type of fish would you recommend I start with?


Walleye Pike. Probably the best tasting fish, not fishy tasting. Hard
to find unless you live in the northern states, though.

-A
  #52 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 10:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote on 23 Jan 2006 in rec.food.cooking

Walleye pike is a great tasting fish. If memory serves, the pike is a
very strong fighter and very hard to get into the net.

Michael


Walleye is a type of pickrel(tastes better than trout to me)...Pike isn't
as well loved it eats most anything

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
  #53 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2006, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan wrote:


Walleye Pike. Probably the best tasting fish, not fishy tasting.
Hard to find unless you live in the northern states, though.

-A


Walleye pike is a great tasting fish. If memory serves, the pike is a very
strong fighter and very hard to get into the net.


How many names do they have for that fish? Walleye, Walleye Pike, Walleye
Pickerel, Pickerel, Yellow Pickerel.

It is pretty good fish. My brother goes fishing in Lake Erie and gives me lots
of it.


  #54 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2006, 12:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote on 23 Jan 2006 in rec.food.cooking

So it's 2 different fish? I'm not a fisherman although I loved the
fishing trips I took with my father. The thought of baiting a hook
was extremely distasteful to mother, so she did not go with us. I
don't know a lot about fresh water fish. Blue Gill were fierce little
combatants if I recall. Tasty too.


Pickrel don't fight much...Pikes do. Medium to Large pikes will and can eat
ducklings in one swallow. And pikes over 4 foot in length aren't that
rare. Lots of American come up here to fish Pike...Northern Pike. Because
of their will to fight. They have been known to pull a canoe or small boat.
Pike is edible and not that bad taste-wise. It's more of a sport fish than
a eating fish.

But Pickrel is very tasty and more of a shore lunch kinda fish. A plate of
Pickrel cheeks is a real treat. Even a breaded pickrel filet is nothing to
turn your nose up over.

You can buy Pickrel in the stores up here, but they don't sell Northern
Pike due to no customer interest.

You usually fish pike with a spoon by trolling or by jigging.
You use a float with bait to catch pickrel.



--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
  #55 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2006, 01:30 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan wrote:


It is pretty good fish. My brother goes fishing in Lake Erie and gives
me lots of it.




Lucky you. Now I'm not sure what I was eating, Walleye, Walleye Pike or
Pike. Methinks it was Walleye Pike. Yes, very tasty and I liked it a lot.


You had me confused when you called it Walleye Pike. I thought you had confused
it with Pike, so I Googled it and found it is is called all those different
things. If it was good enough to rave about here it was probably Pickerel
(Walleye), not Pike.

  #56 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2006, 10:01 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Gareth wrote:
I never liked the taste of fish when I was younger, but I think it is
time I tried it again. What type of fish would you recommend I start with?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Gareth.


Thanks for the suggestions. I will see what I can find in my local shops.

Gareth.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
To reply to me directly:

Replace privacy.net with: totalise DOT co DOT uk and replace me with
gareth.harris
  #57 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2006, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?


limey wrote:

We like catfish, because it's sweet and mild. I always buy the farmed
variety and have often wondered - how does that compare to the "wild"

kind,
often called mudcats? We used to catch those in a local pond, but always
gave them away to other fishermen. They were delighted, so we probably

did
something wrong.



Not really. Since non - farmed raised catfish are scavengers they will eat
*anything* and will thus often taste muddy (same with carp). I grew up by
the Mississippi River and the fish markets by the river would put the cats
they caught into big tanks for a few days to "sweeten" them up, e.g. they
would feed them cornmeal or whatever and also constantly change the water in
order to help purge them of some of their "impurities"...only then would
they be offered for sale.

Farm - raised are far cleaner and better tasting, thus their
popularity...before farm - raised became widely available catfish were often
looked upon as "trash" fish, and often for good reason.

Go he

http://www.catfishinstitute.com/

--
Best
Greg



  #58 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2006, 10:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?


Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

Thanks for the info. Again, I don't fish much and probably confused the
names of the fish. I remember the names Walleye and Pike so I assumed they
were one in the same. The fishing took place in Wisconsin. Lots of good
cheese.



I saw one of those "singing fish" at Walgreens over the holidays and IIRC it
was a Walleye Pike ;--p

[Fish apparently like cheeze too (sorry Sheldon ;-), it can be used for
bait...]

--
Best
Greg



  #59 (permalink)  
Old 25-01-2006, 06:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Gloria wrote:

Dear Son also raved recently about salmon, wrapped in phyllo and baked,
served with a lemon-dill sauce.


Years ago I had something similar in a restaurant: A salmon Napoleon with a
lemon-dill cream sauce, sprinkled with salmon caviar. 22 years later, I
still remember how good it was.

Bob


  #60 (permalink)  
Old 25-01-2006, 06:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Least fishy tasting fish?

Greg wrote:

Not really. Since non - farmed raised catfish are scavengers they will
eat *anything* and will thus often taste muddy (same with carp). I grew
up by the Mississippi River and the fish markets by the river would put
the cats they caught into big tanks for a few days to "sweeten" them up,
e.g. they would feed them cornmeal or whatever and also constantly change
the water in order to help purge them of some of their "impurities"...only
then would they be offered for sale.

Farm - raised are far cleaner and better tasting, thus their
popularity...before farm - raised became widely available catfish were
often looked upon as "trash" fish, and often for good reason.


http://www.bigmfishery.com/ is about four miles from where I live. I've
taken my girlfriend's kid there to catch catfish. My favorite way to
prepare the fish is in a Thai curry. (That's also my favorite way of
preparing tilapia.)

Bob


 




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