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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Yorkshire Pudding



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2005, 10:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding

Does anyone have a tried and true recipe that they love for yorky pudding?
There are so many recipes out there and they are all different. Not sure
which one to use. Especially not sure about how much pan drippings to put
into the muffin tins.


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2005, 10:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding


"Aria" ha scritto nel messaggio
news:33Erf.8232$_L5.6851@fed1read06...
Does anyone have a tried and true recipe that they love for yorky pudding?
There are so many recipes out there and they are all different. Not sure
which one to use. Especially not sure about how much pan drippings to put
into the muffin tins.


The Ophelia Yorkies are very very good. I have tried!
--
Merry Christmas and
a Happy New year
Pandora


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2005, 11:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding

St Delia says 3oz flour, 3 fl oz milk, 2 fl oz water, 2 eggs, salt and
pepper. Whisk the lot together, put in hot fat and 15 mins later Robert
is your mother's brother !

I think the key secret is hot fat and cold mixture. We tend to have
better results using smaller pans lthough aesthetically I prefer the
larger ones.

Seiving flour and making hours in advance doesn't change much

Steve



Aria wrote:
Does anyone have a tried and true recipe that they love for yorky pudding?
There are so many recipes out there and they are all different. Not sure
which one to use. Especially not sure about how much pan drippings to put
into the muffin tins.


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 26-12-2005, 01:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding

Aria wrote:

Does anyone have a tried and true recipe that they love for yorky pudding?
There are so many recipes out there and they are all different. Not sure
which one to use. Especially not sure about how much pan drippings to put
into the muffin tins.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Yorkshire Pudding

Recipe By : Graham Kerr, in pre heart attack days
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Beef Breads

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 cups flour
4 eggs
2 1/2 cups milk
1 teaspoon salt
beef drippings

*raise oven temp. to 400 degrees and place pudding in oven when your
roast beef has about 25 min left to
cook. In this way the joint will have the necessary 20 min to rest
before carving and be ready at the same time
as the pudding.

Sift together flour and salt, slowly mixing in eggs and milk.
Cover and allow to stand for at least one hour in a warm place. Beat well.
Heat drippings from roast beef in the oven. There should be sufficient
to cover an 8 inch round cake tin by 1/4
inch.
When blue haze leaves the surface, pour in batter. Place on top rung
of oven for 45 min. (If I make it in muffin
cups I bake 25 min) Serve immediately.



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 26-12-2005, 02:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding

Goomba38 wrote:

Aria wrote:

Does anyone have a tried and true recipe that they love for yorky
pudding? There are so many recipes out there and they are all
different. Not sure which one to use. Especially not sure about how
much pan drippings to put into the muffin tins.

* Exported from MasterCook *

Yorkshire Pudding
Recipe By : Graham Kerr, in pre heart attack days



[snipped]


Heat drippings from roast beef in the oven. There should be sufficient
to cover an 8 inch round cake tin by 1/4 inch.


[snipped]

I have seen other American postings about using large
amounts of fat in Yorkshire Puddings, I wonder if this is
the source of the story?

The fat in Yorkshire Pudding performs exactly the same
function it performs for other things cooked in hot tins. It
stops it sticking. Extra fat will just be wasted or make the
pudding soggy.

Dripping is the traditional fat used to make YP but I have
used olive oil and other vegetable oils very successfully.
It is also traditional to make one large pud in a meat
roasting tin rather than individual ones in a muffin tin.

A pud made in a roasting tin has two very different
textures. The bottom is basically a pancake like thing, the
edges are light and hollow and golden brown and crisp.

The muffin tin version does not develop the pancakey bit. It
is all crisp. Even in Britain this type is taking over.
People eat large joints of meat less often, the small type
can supposedly be frozen and it is easier in restaurants and
canteens.

This is the recipe I learned from my mother, it seems
reliable and produces a nice result. Test it before you use
it in anger, if if does not rise enough increase the flour
by half a spoon :-


milk 1/2 UK pint = 10 fl oz
flour 4oz = 4 rounded table spoonfuls
salt 1 tsp
egg 1

mix in blender.


Oil/grease metal tray with slopping sides, heat in oven to
230C (damn hot)

Slosh oil round trays to wet every part (CAREFULLY!) tip
away excess oil.

Fill to about 5/16 inch with mixture.

Cook 20 min.


Lots of recipes use 2 eggs. It is less 'puddingy' with one.
(If there is such a word)

Noises Off

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 26-12-2005, 10:48 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding




"Steve Y" wrote in message
...
St Delia says 3oz flour, 3 fl oz milk, 2 fl oz water, 2 eggs, salt and
pepper. Whisk the lot together, put in hot fat and 15 mins later
Robert is your mother's brother !

I think the key secret is hot fat and cold mixture. We tend to have
better results using smaller pans lthough aesthetically I prefer the
larger ones.

Seiving flour and making hours in advance doesn't change much


You are welcome to my recipe if you want it

Yorkshire Ophelia

--
http://www.qpat.co.uk/


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 27-12-2005, 03:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding

Alex Rast wrote:


What I've found is that there's no "secret" really - in the sense that one
thing makes all the difference. Rather it's a question of method and
recipe.


I think that sometimes it depends on how you are holding your tongue when you
make them. I have used several different recipes and the same methods, making
them early and letting them sit or making them just before putting them in the
oven, but always, always preheat the pan with the fat in it. I have never had
them not turn out at all. They always puffed up to some degree, but a few
times they have puffed up way more than they usually do, and one time they were
absolutely spectacular. I don't know what I did differently that time that I
might replicate the results.

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 27-12-2005, 08:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding

at Sun, 25 Dec 2005 22:19:50 GMT in ,
(Steve Y) wrote :

St Delia says 3oz flour, 3 fl oz milk, 2 fl oz water, 2 eggs, salt and
pepper. Whisk the lot together, put in hot fat and 15 mins later Robert
is your mother's brother !

I think the key secret is hot fat and cold mixture. We tend to have
better results using smaller pans lthough aesthetically I prefer the
larger ones.

Seiving flour and making hours in advance doesn't change much

Steve


What I've found is that there's no "secret" really - in the sense that one
thing makes all the difference. Rather it's a question of method and
recipe. It's important that the ratios of flour, eggs, and milk be right.
Too much milk relative to other things tends to lead to hockey-puck
rubberiness. Meanwhile, too much flour means bready dryness, while too many
eggs achieves a cakey softness. These are generalisations.

Hot fat means good, immediate external crisping - you're basically frying
the outside of the pudding. Lots of fat is generally better than little fat
because it promotes good flavour and strong crisping without overdrying or
sticking to the pan. For good rise, you definitely want a high temperature,
for without it the steam doesn't get produced fast enough and everything
just sort of cooks in place.

Pastry flour (low-protein) works better than bread or all-purpose flour
which become denser and tougher.

The biggest mistake seems to be adding more milk in order to get a fluid
batter at the beginning of the process. If your batter isn't creamy-fluid
to begin with usually that's an indication that you had too much flour,
possibly a problem with your recipe. If your batter is thick and almost
pasty, it's going to be somewhat difficult to recover, because what you
will really need to do is add more milk *and* eggs proportionately. Of
course the problem here is that eggs come in discrete units. So you'll need
to scale up the whole recipe to the next number of eggs, now adding
somewhat less flour than what the scaled-up amount would have called for.


So, here's what works for me:

2 cups pastry flour
2 large eggs
~ 1 1/2 cups milk
pinch of salt
2 tbsp fat (ideally, beef drippings. If you don't have enough drippings for
this, goose fat will work OK)

Mix flour and salt. Beat in eggs and milk until you get a smooth, creamy
consistency. In 2, ideally heavy steel pie dishes, put a tablespoon of fat
each. Heat in a 425F oven until smoking hot. Immediately pour the batter in
and bake for about 40-45 minutes. Serve immediately.

--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 28-12-2005, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding


"Dave Smith" wrote in message
...
Alex Rast wrote:


What I've found is that there's no "secret" really - in the sense
that one
thing makes all the difference. Rather it's a question of method and
recipe.


I think that sometimes it depends on how you are holding your tongue
when you
make them. I have used several different recipes and the same methods,
making
them early and letting them sit or making them just before putting
them in the
oven, but always, always preheat the pan with the fat in it. I have
never had
them not turn out at all. They always puffed up to some degree, but a
few
times they have puffed up way more than they usually do, and one time
they were
absolutely spectacular. I don't know what I did differently that time
that I
might replicate the results.


I bet you are forgetting to sacrifice the cockerel and turn around 3
times in the full moon!


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 28-12-2005, 07:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding


"Ophelia" wrote

I bet you are forgetting to sacrifice the cockerel and turn around 3 times
in the full moon!


That's illegal in all 50 states with the exception of Las Vegas.

nancy


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 28-12-2005, 08:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Yorkshire Pudding



"Nancy Young" wrote in message
...

"Ophelia" wrote

I bet you are forgetting to sacrifice the cockerel and turn around 3
times in the full moon!


That's illegal in all 50 states with the exception of Las Vegas.


I bet it gets done undercover!!


 




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