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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Internal Temperature of Brisket



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 04:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Internal Temperature of Brisket

Since I got this remote probe themometer by Maverick, I thought I
would try it out on the Brisket today and the Turkey tomorrow before
deciding whether or not to keep it..

However, I have no idea what temperature Brisket gets soft but not
falling apart. I usually poke it with a fork. Is there a temperature
that denotes that state? Right now after 2 hours and 15 minutes of
cooking with the the first 25 minutes at 500 and the rest at 350, the
themometer says 183 degrees. I know it's not even close to done yet.
Have any of you used a themometer for Brisket to at least preventing
forgetting about it and really nuking it to deaeth. I know that's
hard with Brisket but it;'s not a bad idea to know a range at which
you need to be careful.

Now it's 186 degrees.

Alan
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 05:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Internal Temperature of Brisket

I forgot to mention it's the flat cut of brisket

On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 10:48:20 -0500, alan wrote:

Since I got this remote probe themometer by Maverick, I thought I
would try it out on the Brisket today and the Turkey tomorrow before
deciding whether or not to keep it..

However, I have no idea what temperature Brisket gets soft but not
falling apart. I usually poke it with a fork. Is there a temperature
that denotes that state? Right now after 2 hours and 15 minutes of
cooking with the the first 25 minutes at 500 and the rest at 350, the
themometer says 183 degrees. I know it's not even close to done yet.
Have any of you used a themometer for Brisket to at least preventing
forgetting about it and really nuking it to deaeth. I know that's
hard with Brisket but it;'s not a bad idea to know a range at which
you need to be careful.

Now it's 186 degrees.

Alan

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 05:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Internal Temperature of Brisket


alan wrote:
Since I got this remote probe themometer by Maverick, I thought I
would try it out on the Brisket today and the Turkey tomorrow before
deciding whether or not to keep it..

However, I have no idea what temperature Brisket gets soft but not
falling apart. I usually poke it with a fork. Is there a temperature
that denotes that state? Right now after 2 hours and 15 minutes of
cooking with the the first 25 minutes at 500 and the rest at 350, the
themometer says 183 degrees. I know it's not even close to done yet.
Have any of you used a themometer for Brisket to at least preventing
forgetting about it and really nuking it to deaeth. I know that's
hard with Brisket but it;'s not a bad idea to know a range at which
you need to be careful.

Now it's 186 degrees.


Brisket is cooked by tenderness, not temperature... stick a fork in it.

Anyway for dry roasting brisket 350F much too high a temperature,
it'll become dry and burn before it becomes tender... drop down to
275F, tent loosely with foil, and cook until fork tender, perhaps six
hours. Hopefully you didn't already cook it too long at that
temperature... oh, well... your shoes need resoling anyway.

Sheldon-q

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 05:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Internal Temperature of Brisket

Sheldon,

Thanks. I ran down and opened the oven a bit and put it down to 275.
It's dry roasted but, I put finey chopped garlic, onion soup, lots of
ketchup and lots of onions on top, so that should help to keep it
moist and I had aluminum foil on from the beginning.

The internal temperature was up to 201 a minute ago, now it's 198.
It's now three hours of cooking. So I think the patient will survive.
Since I posted this thread, I checked out the web and I saw internal
cooking temperatures from 140, which will be like a brick to 210. it's
down to 197. I am surprised it's going down so fast. I wonder if
it's picking up any of the temperature from the oven. The probe is in
pretty far, just not all the way. Now it's 196

Alan

On 23 Nov 2005 08:12:06 -0800, "Sheldon" wrote:


alan wrote:
Since I got this remote probe themometer by Maverick, I thought I
would try it out on the Brisket today and the Turkey tomorrow before
deciding whether or not to keep it..

However, I have no idea what temperature Brisket gets soft but not
falling apart. I usually poke it with a fork. Is there a temperature
that denotes that state? Right now after 2 hours and 15 minutes of
cooking with the the first 25 minutes at 500 and the rest at 350, the
themometer says 183 degrees. I know it's not even close to done yet.
Have any of you used a themometer for Brisket to at least preventing
forgetting about it and really nuking it to deaeth. I know that's
hard with Brisket but it;'s not a bad idea to know a range at which
you need to be careful.

Now it's 186 degrees.


Brisket is cooked by tenderness, not temperature... stick a fork in it.

Anyway for dry roasting brisket 350F much too high a temperature,
it'll become dry and burn before it becomes tender... drop down to
275F, tent loosely with foil, and cook until fork tender, perhaps six
hours. Hopefully you didn't already cook it too long at that
temperature... oh, well... your shoes need resoling anyway.

Sheldon-q

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 06:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: n/a
Default Internal Temperature of Brisket


"alan" wrote in message
news
Sheldon,

Thanks. I ran down and opened the oven a bit and put it down to 275.
It's dry roasted but, I put finey chopped garlic, onion soup, lots of
ketchup and lots of onions on top, so that should help to keep it
moist and I had aluminum foil on from the beginning.

The internal temperature was up to 201 a minute ago, now it's 198.
It's now three hours of cooking. So I think the patient will survive.
Since I posted this thread, I checked out the web and I saw internal
cooking temperatures from 140, which will be like a brick to 210. it's
down to 197. I am surprised it's going down so fast. I wonder if
it's picking up any of the temperature from the oven. The probe is in
pretty far, just not all the way. Now it's 196

Alan


Allan, we do our brisket on the smoker, but the same idea applies. Sheldon
is right; keep the temp at about 275 and cook until about 190 internal. Do
the fork test. When you twist a fork in the meat and it twists easily, it's
done. As always with meat like that, it's done when it's done. No time
frame there.

kili


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 07:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Internal Temperature of Brisket


kilikini wrote:
"alan" wrote in message
news
Sheldon,

Thanks. I ran down and opened the oven a bit and put it down to 275.
It's dry roasted but, I put finey chopped garlic, onion soup, lots of
ketchup and lots of onions on top, so that should help to keep it
moist and I had aluminum foil on from the beginning.

The internal temperature was up to 201 a minute ago, now it's 198.
It's now three hours of cooking. So I think the patient will survive.
Since I posted this thread, I checked out the web and I saw internal
cooking temperatures from 140, which will be like a brick to 210. it's
down to 197. I am surprised it's going down so fast. I wonder if
it's picking up any of the temperature from the oven. The probe is in
pretty far, just not all the way. Now it's 196

Alan


Allan, we do our brisket on the smoker, but the same idea applies. Sheldon
is right; keep the temp at about 275 and cook until about 190 internal. Do
the fork test. When you twist a fork in the meat and it twists easily, it's
done. As always with meat like that, it's done when it's done. No time
frame there.

Yeah, well, meat can't get to a higher temperature than 212F, not
unless it's in a pressure device or it's incinerated. I don't really
care for the texture of any meat when it's falling apart into strings,
I like it cooked so it's tender but still firm enough that I can slice
it.

Sheldon

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2005, 11:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: n/a
Default Internal Temperature of Brisket

Sheldon wrote:
: alan wrote:
:: Since I got this remote probe themometer by Maverick, I thought I
:: would try it out on the Brisket today and the Turkey tomorrow
before
:: deciding whether or not to keep it..
::
:: However, I have no idea what temperature Brisket gets soft but not
:: falling apart. I usually poke it with a fork. Is there a
temperature
:: that denotes that state? Right now after 2 hours and 15 minutes of
:: cooking with the the first 25 minutes at 500 and the rest at 350,
the
:: themometer says 183 degrees. I know it's not even close to done
yet.
:: Have any of you used a themometer for Brisket to at least
preventing
:: forgetting about it and really nuking it to deaeth. I know that's
:: hard with Brisket but it;'s not a bad idea to know a range at which
:: you need to be careful.
::
:: Now it's 186 degrees.
:
: Brisket is cooked by tenderness, not temperature... stick a fork in
it.
:
: Anyway for dry roasting brisket 350F much too high a temperature,
: it'll become dry and burn before it becomes tender... drop down to
: 275F, tent loosely with foil, and cook until fork tender, perhaps
six
: hours. Hopefully you didn't already cook it too long at that
: temperature... oh, well... your shoes need resoling anyway.
:
: Sheldon-q

Exactly what Sheldon said.
That fork may twist anywhere between 150 to 195 degrees internal
temperature depending on the individual brisket.
Like Kili, I usually smoke briskets, and start them for the first
couple of hours @ about 225 to 250, then raise the temperature to 275
for the remainder of the cook. The only reason for the lower starting
temperature is that I'll get a darker smoke ring and it makes a great
presentation. Doesn't add to the taste at all, and can't happen in
your oven, so just use 275 the entire cook.

BOB

--
Raw Meat Should NOT Have An Ingredients List


 




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