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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

minced zest of 1 orange?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 05:15 AM
tenplay
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Default minced zest of 1 orange?

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1 orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 05:36 AM
Wayne Boatwright
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Default minced zest of 1 orange?

"tenplay" wrote in news:xpkkc.1547$I%1.179493@attbi_s51:

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1 orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


Use a citrus zester or vegetable peeler to remove the zest from the orange,
then use a small chef's knife to mince it. Be sure to remove only the zest
(down to just barely below the colored part) and do not cut down into the
pithy part of the peel.

Wayne
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 05:46 AM
Scott
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Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

In article xpkkc.1547$I%1.179493@attbi_s51,
"tenplay" wrote:

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1 orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


Scrape off the colored part of the peel, avoiding as much of the white
part as possible. The colored portion contains all of the flavor and
aroma; the white (the pith) is bitter. A microplane works best, IMHO;
gourmet food stores usually sell them, but you can save a lot of money
by buying the exact same thing at a hardware store. They also sell
little devices which are specifically made for zesting, but they're
pretty monopurpose.

Dedicated-purpose zesters basically create long strips; the microplane
creates ready-minced zest.

From my favorite hardware site:
http://tinyurl.com/2rage

(they have *great* catalogs!)

--
to respond, change "spamless.invalid" with "optonline.net"
please mail OT responses only
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 10:32 AM
Charles Gifford
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?


"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article xpkkc.1547$I%1.179493@attbi_s51,
"tenplay" wrote:

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1 orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


Scrape off the colored part of the peel, avoiding as much of the white
part as possible. The colored portion contains all of the flavor and
aroma; the white (the pith) is bitter. A microplane works best, IMHO;
gourmet food stores usually sell them, but you can save a lot of money
by buying the exact same thing at a hardware store. They also sell
little devices which are specifically made for zesting, but they're
pretty monopurpose.

Dedicated-purpose zesters basically create long strips; the microplane
creates ready-minced zest.


No way does a microplane create minced zest. Microplanes produce very finely
grated zest.

After removing the zest into strips by any method, one then uses a knife to
mince the zest.

Charlie


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 03:28 PM
Dunter Powries
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

Charles Gifford wrote in message
et...

"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article xpkkc.1547$I%1.179493@attbi_s51,
"tenplay" wrote:

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1

orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


Scrape off the colored part of the peel, avoiding as much of the white
part as possible. The colored portion contains all of the flavor and
aroma; the white (the pith) is bitter. A microplane works best, IMHO;
gourmet food stores usually sell them, but you can save a lot of money
by buying the exact same thing at a hardware store. They also sell
little devices which are specifically made for zesting, but they're
pretty monopurpose.

Dedicated-purpose zesters basically create long strips; the microplane
creates ready-minced zest.


No way does a microplane create minced zest. Microplanes produce very

finely
grated zest.

After removing the zest into strips by any method, one then uses a knife

to
mince the zest.


What's the point of going to the trouble of making strips of zest and then
mincing it? Just grate the orange in the first place... lightly, of course.

Incidentally, I got an introductory offer from 'Fine Cooking' the other day
which included a give-away recipe for Orange-Scented English Scones - using
the grated zest of one medium orange, incidentally. It looked interesting
and easy so I whipped up a batch. They were the BEST scones I've ever
eaten!

Dunty Porteous

--
"It tastes like burning..... waaaaa!!!!"
-Ralph Wiggum


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 05:02 PM
Kate Connally
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Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

Dunter Powries wrote:

Charles Gifford wrote in message
et...

"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article xpkkc.1547$I%1.179493@attbi_s51,
"tenplay" wrote:

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1

orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.

Scrape off the colored part of the peel, avoiding as much of the white
part as possible. The colored portion contains all of the flavor and
aroma; the white (the pith) is bitter. A microplane works best, IMHO;
gourmet food stores usually sell them, but you can save a lot of money
by buying the exact same thing at a hardware store. They also sell
little devices which are specifically made for zesting, but they're
pretty monopurpose.

Dedicated-purpose zesters basically create long strips; the microplane
creates ready-minced zest.


No way does a microplane create minced zest. Microplanes produce very

finely
grated zest.

After removing the zest into strips by any method, one then uses a knife

to
mince the zest.


What's the point of going to the trouble of making strips of zest and then
mincing it? Just grate the orange in the first place... lightly, of course.


I always hated grating because it's too easy to get too
much pith. When I discovered zesters I got one and that's
what I use to this day. Zest, then mince. Much better
control of what part of the peel you get, thus yielding
much better taste.

Also with graters a lot of the peel remains in the
grater and you have to spend a lot of time trying to
scrape it out. A lot of it gets wasted because it's
impossible to get it all off the grater without rinsing
it under running water. Major nuisance.

My aunt just got a microplane grater. I don't know
how well it works yet. I'll have to ask her if she's
used it yet and if it works better than a regulare
grater. The main thing she got it for was grating
citrus rinds. I didn't like the look of it myself.
It look lethal and like it would be overkill for
small things like lemon or lime. That sucker is nearly
a foot long. I'd be afraid I'd grate my knuckles off
trying to use it. I'll stick to my zester.

Kate

--
Kate Connally
If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
Until you bite their heads off.
What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 05:33 PM
Default User
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

Scott wrote:

Scrape off the colored part of the peel, avoiding as much of the white
part as possible. The colored portion contains all of the flavor and
aroma; the white (the pith) is bitter. A microplane works best, IMHO;
gourmet food stores usually sell them, but you can save a lot of money
by buying the exact same thing at a hardware store. They also sell
little devices which are specifically made for zesting, but they're
pretty monopurpose.



You can get the kitchen versions (which have nicer handles in my
opinion) at more places these days. True value hardware in my area
carries both the dedicated graters and the ones with the swappable
blades like I have.




Brian Rodenborn
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 05:34 PM
Default User
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

Kate Connally wrote:

I always hated grating because it's too easy to get too
much pith.



Not with a microplane. You'll be amazed at the control you have.




Brian Rodenborn
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 09:55 PM
Karen O'Mara
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

"Dunter Powries" fech.redcaps@spedlin wrote in message ...
What's the point of going to the trouble of making strips of zest and then
mincing it? Just grate the orange in the first place... lightly, of course.


Seems to have a different end result... like garlic or onion would.

Karen
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 30-04-2004, 09:59 PM
Dave Smith
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Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

tenplay wrote:

In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1 orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


I would use my microplane grater.

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2004, 12:09 AM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

(Karen O'Mara) writes:

"Dunter Powries" wrote:
What's the point of going to the trouble of making strips of zest and then
mincing it? Just grate the orange in the first place... lightly, of

course.

Seems to have a different end result... like garlic or onion would.


Not really. Onion and garlic are different ingredients. Orange zest is still
orange zest no matter how it is prepared. Whether zest is finely minced or
grated is about appearence, not flavor.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2004, 03:16 AM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?

tenplay wrote:
In a recipe I came across, one ingredient is "minced zest of 1 orange".
Exactly how does one make it? thanks.


Take one orange and peel off the yellow part of the skin. Wash the
orange thoroughly first. Then take the yellow part (the zest) and
chop it finely on a cutting board. There's a little tool called
a zester which you can get for a few dollars at any decent cookwares
store and many supermarkets to make the peeling easier.

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 01-05-2004, 10:21 PM
Kswck
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default minced zest of 1 orange?


"PENMART01" wrote in message
...
(Karen O'Mara) writes:

"Dunter Powries" wrote:
What's the point of going to the trouble of making strips of zest and

then
mincing it? Just grate the orange in the first place... lightly, of

course.

Seems to have a different end result... like garlic or onion would.


Not really. Onion and garlic are different ingredients. Orange zest is

still
orange zest no matter how it is prepared. Whether zest is finely minced

or
grated is about appearence, not flavor.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````


I disagree Sheldon. I just made a knock-off of A1 sauce and it called for
orange zest. The misture was cooked and then pureed. After pureeing, looks
have nothing to do with it.


 




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