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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Do granulated and powdered sugar measure the same?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 02:01 AM
Andy
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Default Do granulated and powdered sugar measure the same?

Wondering about substituting powdered instead of granulated sugar in a
cream cheese frosting recipe.

Do they measure the same for volume? The recipe calls for 1 cup
granulated.

Thanks,

Andy
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 02:21 AM
Sheldon
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Andy wrote:
Wondering about substituting powdered instead of granulated sugar in a
cream cheese frosting recipe.

Do they measure the same for volume? The recipe calls for 1 cup
granulated.


Are you sure about a cream cheese frosting recipe calling for
granulated... I'd be very suspicious... are you sure you read that
correctly?

Naturally you can substitute granulated for powdered equally by weight.
I think you can substitute 2 1/2 cups powdered for one cup granulated,
but this is not very accurate as granulated sugars are not always the
same volume by weight, neither are powdered for that matter.. it's best
to use a scale, unless you buy both sugars in equal weight packages....
granulated sugar does come in a one pound box too.

Sheldon

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 02:41 AM
Wayne Boatwright
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Default

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:21:02p, Sheldon wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Andy wrote:
Wondering about substituting powdered instead of granulated sugar in a
cream cheese frosting recipe.

Do they measure the same for volume? The recipe calls for 1 cup
granulated.


Are you sure about a cream cheese frosting recipe calling for
granulated... I'd be very suspicious... are you sure you read that
correctly?

Naturally you can substitute granulated for powdered equally by weight.
I think you can substitute 2 1/2 cups powdered for one cup granulated,
but this is not very accurate as granulated sugars are not always the
same volume by weight, neither are powdered for that matter.. it's best
to use a scale, unless you buy both sugars in equal weight packages....
granulated sugar does come in a one pound box too.

Sheldon


In addition to that, powdered sugar most often has some amount of
cornstarch added to it. I believe that's used primarily to prevent caking.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 02:49 AM
Damsel
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Default

"Sheldon" said:

Andy wrote:
Wondering about substituting powdered instead of granulated sugar in a
cream cheese frosting recipe.

Do they measure the same for volume? The recipe calls for 1 cup
granulated.


Are you sure about a cream cheese frosting recipe calling for
granulated... I'd be very suspicious... are you sure you read that
correctly?


Sounds weird to me, too. Could be that someone wrote it down or published
it wrong, too.

Naturally you can substitute granulated for powdered equally by weight.
I think you can substitute 2 1/2 cups powdered for one cup granulated,
but this is not very accurate as granulated sugars are not always the
same volume by weight, neither are powdered for that matter.. it's best
to use a scale, unless you buy both sugars in equal weight packages....
granulated sugar does come in a one pound box too.


Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump and
mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick, add a
little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable again.

Carol

--
CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
United States:
http://www.stopthehunger.com/
International:
http://www.thehungersite.com/
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:00 AM
LynneA
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Default


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump
and
mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick, add a
little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable again.

Carol


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as
much
frosting as I needed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


And that's bad, WHY exactly?? LOLOL

Lynne A



  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:00 AM
Wayne Boatwright
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump and
mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick, add a
little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable again.

Carol


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as much
frosting as I needed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:10 AM
Damsel
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Default

Wayne Boatwright said:

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump and
mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick, add a
little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable again.


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as much
frosting as I needed. :-)


That is precisely why God made graham crackers.

Carol

--
CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
United States:
http://www.stopthehunger.com/
International:
http://www.thehungersite.com/
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:10 AM
LynneA
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Thu 16 Jun 2005 07:00:47p, LynneA wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as
much frosting as I needed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


And that's bad, WHY exactly?? LOLOL

Lynne A


I didn't say it was bad, but it should be accounted for in some recipes.
For example, it's an advantage when used in meringues for pies. It helps
to stabilize the meringue. In frosting it's not really an issue. If you
use it to sweeten beverages, it usually imparts a cloudiness to the
liquid.


--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


See, you have to be all reasonable, while I'm thinking of polishing off all
that extra frostingGG

Lynne A



  #9 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:10 AM
Wayne Boatwright
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 07:00:47p, LynneA wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump
and mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick, add
a little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable
again.

Carol


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as
much frosting as I needed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


And that's bad, WHY exactly?? LOLOL

Lynne A


I didn't say it was bad, but it should be accounted for in some recipes.
For example, it's an advantage when used in meringues for pies. It helps
to stabilize the meringue. In frosting it's not really an issue. If you
use it to sweeten beverages, it usually imparts a cloudiness to the liquid.


--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:16 AM
Wayne Boatwright
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 07:10:12p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Wayne Boatwright said:

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump
and mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick,
add a little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable
again.


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as
much frosting as I needed. :-)


That is precisely why God made graham crackers.

Carol


I see your point, and it's always better to have too much than too little!
:-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:16 AM
Wayne Boatwright
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 07:10:20p, LynneA wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...
On Thu 16 Jun 2005 07:00:47p, LynneA wrote in rec.food.cooking:


"Wayne Boatwright" wrote in message
...


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump
and mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three
times as much frosting as I needed. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright ** ____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974

And that's bad, WHY exactly?? LOLOL

Lynne A


I didn't say it was bad, but it should be accounted for in some
recipes. For example, it's an advantage when used in meringues for
pies. It helps to stabilize the meringue. In frosting it's not really
an issue. If you use it to sweeten beverages, it usually imparts a
cloudiness to the liquid.


--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


See, you have to be all reasonable, while I'm thinking of polishing off
all that extra frostingGG

Lynne A




Well, Carol had a good idea...spread it on graham crackers.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:18 AM
itsjoannotjoann
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Posts: n/a
Default




Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as much
frosting as I needed. :-)


That is precisely why God made graham crackers.

Carol

--



Graham crackers, my foot! That's why God made spoons!! (Oh, how I
always wished Mom had made way too much frosting. No such luck.)

:-))

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:19 AM
Sheldon
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Posts: n/a
Default



Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and mix, dump and
mix until it's the consistency you want. If it gets too thick, add a
little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.) until it's spreadable again.

Carol


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the "dump and
mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with about three times as much
frosting as I needed. :-)


Then what you needed was a crumpet with larger bosoms. :-o

Sheldon

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:30 AM
Monsur Fromage du Pollet
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Default

Damsel wrote on 16 Jun 2005 in rec.food.cooking

Wayne Boatwright said:

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and
mix, dump and mix until it's the consistency you want. If it
gets too thick, add a little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.)
until it's spreadable again.


Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the
"dump and mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with
about three times as much frosting as I needed. :-)


That is precisely why God made graham crackers.

Carol


And strawberries.

--
It's not a question of where he grips it!
It's a simple question of weight ratios!

A five ounce bird could not carry a one pound coconut.

Are you suggesting coconuts migrate?
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 17-06-2005, 03:39 AM
Damsel
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Posts: n/a
Default

Monsur Fromage du Pollet said:

Damsel wrote on 16 Jun 2005 in rec.food.cooking

Wayne Boatwright said:

On Thu 16 Jun 2005 06:49:59p, Damsel wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Call me a rebel, but I wouldn't measure it at all. Dump and
mix, dump and mix until it's the consistency you want. If it
gets too thick, add a little liquid (milk, cream, coffee, etc.)
until it's spreadable again.

Okay, you're a rebel! On the few occasions when I've used the
"dump and mix" method of making frosting, I've ended up with
about three times as much frosting as I needed. :-)


That is precisely why God made graham crackers.


And strawberries.


Damn you! I don't have strawberries planted this year!

Carol, whimpering

--
CLICK DAILY TO FEED THE HUNGRY
United States:
http://www.stopthehunger.com/
International:
http://www.thehungersite.com/
 




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