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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Falling cheesecake



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 05:38 PM
L. Raymond
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Default Falling cheesecake

I'm wondering if anyone can offer hints as to how to prevent a
cheesecake from falling. When it bakes (12 mins. at 450 degrees
followed by 55 mins. at 300), it expands to almost a half inch above
the rim of the pan, but I've never been able to cool it without having
it fall about 1/4 inch below the rim. Actually, if I could keep it
from expanding so much to begin with, I suspect that would help, but I
don't know what to adjust. It still tastes fine, and everyone who's
eaten some always takes several pieces home, but I think it's too
dense at the end.
Besides vanilla and lemon extract, the ingredients include 40 oz.
cream cheese, 3 T flour, 1.75 C sugar, 4-5 eggs + 2 yolks and 1/4 C
cream.

--

L. Raymond
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 05:51 PM
Curly Sue
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Default Falling cheesecake

On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 16:38:49 GMT, L. Raymond
wrote:

I'm wondering if anyone can offer hints as to how to prevent a
cheesecake from falling. When it bakes (12 mins. at 450 degrees
followed by 55 mins. at 300), it expands to almost a half inch above
the rim of the pan, but I've never been able to cool it without having
it fall about 1/4 inch below the rim. Actually, if I could keep it
from expanding so much to begin with, I suspect that would help, but I
don't know what to adjust. It still tastes fine, and everyone who's
eaten some always takes several pieces home, but I think it's too
dense at the end.
Besides vanilla and lemon extract, the ingredients include 40 oz.
cream cheese, 3 T flour, 1.75 C sugar, 4-5 eggs + 2 yolks and 1/4 C
cream.


Turn off the oven and leave the cheesecake undisturbed for another
hour.

Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 06:25 PM
Levelwave©
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Default Falling cheesecake

L. Raymond wrote:

I'm wondering if anyone can offer hints as to how to prevent a
cheesecake from falling.



Did you let it cool in the oven?

~john
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 06:59 PM
L. Raymond
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Default Falling cheesecake

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?Levelwave=A9?= wrote:

L. Raymond wrote:

I'm wondering if anyone can offer hints as to how to prevent a
cheesecake from falling.



Did you let it cool in the oven?


I've turned the oven off and let it sit for an hour. I've dropped
the temperature to 100 degrees and let it sit. I've taken it out and
immediately put it under a dome to keep the heat in. It always tastes
excellent, but I'm just not happy with the look.
--

L. Raymond
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 07:08 PM
L. Raymond
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Default Falling cheesecake

Steve Ritter wrote:

This time, the cheesecake is still chilling and came out great. And did
not fall. The taste was fantastic, just licking the bowl told me that. It
looks great.

The difference: The recipe calls to bake the crust of graham crackers at
350F for 10 minutes and add the filling to the cooled pan and bake it at
250 for 1 hour. Let the heat out, and leave the cheesecake in there for
another hour, then chill.


Similar to my recipe, except I don't like gragham cracker crusts so
I use a lemon pastry. It gets baked at 400 for about 8 minutes,
cooled, then the filling is added.

The big difference I see is the temperatures. I'll repost his recipe here
so you can see what I mean. The fact is, that it is baked well, and did not
fall at all.


I'll have to try these lower temps. I'm going to be making several
cheesecakes soon for a little glaze-tasting party, so I'll have plenty
of chances to experiment with different settings.

Lower oven temperature to 250 degrees F. Place cheesecake into a preheated
water bath, in the oven for 1 hour. Turn the oven off and open the door for
one minute. Close the door for one more hour. Remove the cheesecake from
the water bath and place in the refrigerator for 6 hours to completely cool
before serving.


This is an idea a guest and I were just discussing, whether I should
put the pan into a larger pan of water. Also I see he suggests here
opening the oven for just a minute. I've tried not opening the door
at all, or opening it for about 3-4 minutes. I'll have to try this
shorter time, I guess.

Thanks for these ideas; several things I'll have to try now.
--

L. Raymond
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 08:04 PM
Curly Sue
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Default Falling cheesecake

On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 17:56:10 GMT, L. Raymond
wrote:

(Curly Sue) wrote:

Turn off the oven and leave the cheesecake undisturbed for another
hour.


Thanks, but I've done this without any effect on the falling.


Try adding a couple more tbsp of flour. You might not have enough to
stabilize the structure.


Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 18-04-2004, 10:15 PM
hahabogus
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Default Falling cheesecake

L. Raymond wrote in
:

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?Levelwave=A9?= wrote:

L. Raymond wrote:

I'm wondering if anyone can offer hints as to how to prevent a
cheesecake from falling.



Did you let it cool in the oven?


I've turned the oven off and let it sit for an hour. I've dropped
the temperature to 100 degrees and let it sit. I've taken it out and
immediately put it under a dome to keep the heat in. It always tastes
excellent, but I'm just not happy with the look.
--

L. Raymond


I had this last night and I'll admit it fell a little but not much and was
very tasty and nicely browned. It was originally a kraft recipe but I
talked her into modifing the Graham crust by removing 1/4 c crumbs and
adding 1/4 cup chopped nuts. I think coconut in the crumbs would work too.

It was dessert after a fine meal (roast beast) and it had only cooled about
1.75 or 2 hours before we ate it....First time I had ever eaten a warmish
Cheese Cake. But it won't be the last time as it was glorious and melted in
your mouth more than a refridgerated cheesecake does.

Orange Lime CheeseCake

1 cup Graham Waffer Crumbs
1/4 cup Chopped Nuts (Hazelnuts or
Pecans)
1/4 cup Melted Butter
3 pkg (8oz/250gr each) Cream Cheese Room temp.
1 cup Sugar
1 ts Vanilla
1 TB (each) Lemon, Lime, & Orange Juice
1 TB (each) Lemon, Lime, & Orange Peel
3 Eggs


Combine Crumbs, nuuts and Melted Butter and Press into a 9 inch Spring Form
Pan.

Beat Cream Cheese, Sugar and Vanilla on Med Speed till well Blended.
Blend in Juices and Peels.
Add eggs 1 at a time mixing well in between.

Pour over the crust.

Bake at 350F for 45-50 minutes or untill center is almost set.

Cool completely on a rack and refridgerate 4 hours or over night before
serving.

Quite enjoyable eaten after barely cooled (almost room temp)
Serve with whipped Cream.






--
Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food
and water.
--------
FIELDS, W. C.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 02:43 AM
telmgren
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Posts: n/a
Default Falling cheesecake


"L. Raymond" wrote in message
...
Steve Ritter wrote:



This is an idea a guest and I were just discussing, whether I should
put the pan into a larger pan of water. Also I see he suggests here
opening the oven for just a minute. I've tried not opening the door
at all, or opening it for about 3-4 minutes. I'll have to try this
shorter time, I guess.

Thanks for these ideas; several things I'll have to try now.


I think the pan of water is a must. I make cheesecakes fairly often and
always do this, and have always had perfect (well nearly ;o) cakes.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 03:32 AM
Steve Knight
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Default Falling cheesecake

set it in a sheet pan with water in it when you cook it.

--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 03:44 AM
Wayne Boatwright
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Default Falling cheesecake

Steve Knight wrote in
:

set it in a sheet pan with water in it when you cook it.


Be sure and seal the exterior of the springform pan with foil when setting
it in a pan of water.

Wayne
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 01:49 PM
Vox Humana
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Default Falling cheesecake


"L. Raymond" wrote in message
...
I'm wondering if anyone can offer hints as to how to prevent a
cheesecake from falling. When it bakes (12 mins. at 450 degrees
followed by 55 mins. at 300), it expands to almost a half inch above
the rim of the pan, but I've never been able to cool it without having
it fall about 1/4 inch below the rim. Actually, if I could keep it
from expanding so much to begin with, I suspect that would help, but I
don't know what to adjust. It still tastes fine, and everyone who's
eaten some always takes several pieces home, but I think it's too
dense at the end.
Besides vanilla and lemon extract, the ingredients include 40 oz.
cream cheese, 3 T flour, 1.75 C sugar, 4-5 eggs + 2 yolks and 1/4 C
cream.


Here is a slightly different view of the problem. It's not that you have a
problem with your cheesecake falling. Your problem is that it expanded.
While there will be some expansion, you want to minimize it. The most
common error it to over-beat the mixture. This incorporates too much air
and expansion follows. As others have mentioned, moderating the temperature
with a water bath will help. You will not only avoid over-expansion, but
the texture will be better. Follow the advice about slow cooling. Also,
when you do remove the cake from the oven, release it from the sides of the
pan before letting it come to room temperature.


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 04:39 PM
Tracey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Falling cheesecake


"L. Raymond" wrote in message
...
It always tastes
excellent, but I'm just not happy with the look.



Well, to save the look of it, just put some strawberries on top, and no-one
will notice :-)


  #14 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 05:01 PM
L. Raymond
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Falling cheesecake

"Vox Humana" wrote:

Here is a slightly different view of the problem. It's not that you have a
problem with your cheesecake falling. Your problem is that it expanded.
While there will be some expansion, you want to minimize it. The most
common error it to over-beat the mixture.


That sounds likely. Once the batter reaches a pudding-like
consistency there's still beating for each egg and the yolks, and I
probably get carried away.


This incorporates too much air
and expansion follows. As others have mentioned, moderating the temperature
with a water bath will help. You will not only avoid over-expansion, but
the texture will be better. Follow the advice about slow cooling. Also,
when you do remove the cake from the oven, release it from the sides of the
pan before letting it come to room temperature.


Thanks; I'll try these ideas for the next one.

--

L. Raymond
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 19-04-2004, 06:01 PM
Vox Humana
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Falling cheesecake


"L. Raymond" wrote in message
...
"Vox Humana" wrote:

Here is a slightly different view of the problem. It's not that you have

a
problem with your cheesecake falling. Your problem is that it expanded.
While there will be some expansion, you want to minimize it. The most
common error it to over-beat the mixture.


That sounds likely. Once the batter reaches a pudding-like
consistency there's still beating for each egg and the yolks, and I
probably get carried away.


Here is what works for me. I put about half of the cheese and all of the
sugar and flour or cornstarch in the mixer and combine them on low (speed 2
on the kitchenaid). When that is all combined, I add the rest of the
cheese, one package at a time. After all the sugar, starch, and cheese is
combined, I increase the speed slightly and add the eggs, one at a time,
until they are incorporated. At that point I turn off the mixer and stir in
any cream or sour cream by hand. I never go above speed 4 and I only beat
until the eggs disappear.


 




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