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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Mold on Potato Ok?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2005, 10:59 PM
Stressed
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Default Mold on Potato Ok?

If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2005, 11:10 PM
Dee Randall
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"Stressed" wrote in message
ps.com...
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.

I wouldn't eat it myself -- however, I even cover my potatoes from daylight
to keep them from becoming green, so be guided accordingly. What's a potato
cost -- probably less than something you might discard on your plate because
you're too full to eat it.

dee


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2005, 11:41 PM
Peter Aitken
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"Stressed" wrote in message
ps.com...
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.


Is the skin turning green? That's not mold but a nrmal part of potato
development. See http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/horticulture/g1437.htm for more
info.

Peter Aitken


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 09-05-2005, 12:31 AM
aem
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Peter Aitken wrote:

Is the skin turning green? That's not mold but a nrmal part of potato


development. See http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/horticulture/g1437.htm for

more
info.

It may be normal development, but it's best not to eat potatoes that
turn green. They are mildly toxic to most people. If you cut away the
green part, cut well beyond where the green is visible. -aem

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09-05-2005, 03:36 AM
Food For Thought
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It may be normal development, but it's best not to eat potatoes that
turn green


You quoted a post with a link you obviously didn't read. ;-)

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 09-05-2005, 05:51 PM
Stressed
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Default

Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
of black stuff, I thought that was mold. I always thought the green was
from exposure to sun, I'm glad to know that's true. Does anyone know
about black patches on potatoes?

Cost of more potatoes wouldn't be a problem, but time was. We live in
the middle of nowhere, so we couldn't just run out to the store. The
potatoes were to be a special Mothers Day treat for me. He bought me
the largest one he could find. It was going to be baked, piled high
with real butter, real sour cream and full fat cheese. I eat this maybe
twice a year. We will be going out to dinner in August, I think I will
have one then.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09-05-2005, 06:05 PM
Dee Randall
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Default


"Stressed" wrote in message
oups.com...
Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
of black stuff, I thought that was mold. I always thought the green was
from exposure to sun, I'm glad to know that's true. Does anyone know
about black patches on potatoes?

Cost of more potatoes wouldn't be a problem, but time was. We live in
the middle of nowhere, so we couldn't just run out to the store. The
potatoes were to be a special Mothers Day treat for me. He bought me
the largest one he could find. It was going to be baked, piled high
with real butter, real sour cream and full fat cheese. I eat this maybe
twice a year. We will be going out to dinner in August, I think I will
have one then.

I've always wondered what this black discoloration is on potatoes that been
boiled or peeled-and-baked and let set in the refrigerator overnight (to use
the next morning for frying). This black discoloration wasn't there when
they came out of the oven or boiling water.
Any ideas? Or is this another question I'll pose at the Pearly Gates?
Dee


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2005, 03:27 PM
Shaun aRe
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Default


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"Stressed" wrote in message
oups.com...
Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
of black stuff, I thought that was mold. I always thought the green was
from exposure to sun, I'm glad to know that's true. Does anyone know
about black patches on potatoes?

Cost of more potatoes wouldn't be a problem, but time was. We live in
the middle of nowhere, so we couldn't just run out to the store. The
potatoes were to be a special Mothers Day treat for me. He bought me
the largest one he could find. It was going to be baked, piled high
with real butter, real sour cream and full fat cheese. I eat this maybe
twice a year. We will be going out to dinner in August, I think I will
have one then.

I've always wondered what this black discoloration is on potatoes that

been
boiled or peeled-and-baked and let set in the refrigerator overnight (to

use
the next morning for frying). This black discoloration wasn't there when
they came out of the oven or boiling water.
Any ideas? Or is this another question I'll pose at the Pearly Gates?
Dee


Enzymatic degradation of starches perhaps? I know at least a lot of starches
blacken with exposure to oxygen or other oxidising substances. I do know
it's harmless, mind you.


Shaun aRe


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2005, 03:29 PM
Shaun aRe
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Stressed" wrote in message
oups.com...
Sorry, I should have been more clear. It wasn't green, it was patches
of black stuff, I thought that was mold. I always thought the green was
from exposure to sun, I'm glad to know that's true. Does anyone know
about black patches on potatoes?


If it was a fresh, unpeeled potato, and the black was on the skin itself,
then yes, likely it was just a surface mold, probably a mildew of sorts - I
would have no problem eating the potato if it were peeled to white and
washed first, none at all.




Shaun aRe


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2005, 03:45 PM
Sheldon
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Posts: n/a
Default


Stressed wrote:
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.


Potatoes are subject to myriad diseases.

A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the tuber
surface. These patches, called "sclerotia," look just like dried-on
soil. Unlike soil, however, these patches won't rinse off easily.

Simply peel and use.

Sheldon

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2005, 04:24 PM
Shaun aRe
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Stressed wrote:
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no, my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.


Potatoes are subject to myriad diseases.

A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the tuber
surface. These patches, called "sclerotia,"


Are you *certain* you have the right word there?

"n. pl. scle·ro·ti·a (-sh-, -sh)
A dense mass of branched hyphae, as in certain fungi, that contain stored
food and are capable of remaining dormant for long periods.

[New Latin, from Greek sklrots, hardness, from sklros, hard.]"

Truffles are sclerotia.




Shaun aRe - Bit of a fungiphile.






Attached Thumbnails
mold-potato-ok-emacr.gif  mold-potato-ok-schwa.gif  
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2005, 05:37 PM
Sheldon
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Shaun a Dimwit scrawled:
"Sheldon" wrote:
Stressed wrote:
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no,

my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.


Potatoes are subject to myriad diseases.

A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the

tuber
surface. These patches, called "sclerotia,"


Are you *certain* you have the right word there?


Are you *certain* you have the correct reference there... dictionarys
are notoriously worthless for abstractions.


"n. pl. scle=B7ro=B7ti=B7a (-sh-, -sh)
A dense mass of branched hyphae, as in certain fungi, that contain

stored
food and are capable of remaining dormant for long periods.

[New Latin, from Greek sklrots, hardness, from sklros, hard.]"

Truffles are sclerotia.


Uni-dimensional thinking... can't even comprehend his own reference...
did anyone ever tell you that you are functionally illiterate, you are
you know, most definitely... you've just demonstated that you have the
IQ of a potato, mashed. You're way too dumb to succeed at being a LOUD
MOUTH. I'm positive yours is the lowest IQ of all who've subscribed to
rfc during the past five year period. Typical internet/usenet Newbie,
with hair trigger keyboard. Didn't yer momma teach you to put
pea-brain into gear before opening yap. Had only you'd known how to do
an internet search for potato diseases. DUH

There's a 'zillion' of em:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/pubs/scurf.html

http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.corne...hizoctonia.htm

Sheldon (grows/knows spuds)

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 10-05-2005, 05:47 PM
aem
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Food For Thought wrote:
It may be normal development, but it's best not to eat potatoes that
turn green


You quoted a post with a link you obviously didn't read. ;-)


Oh horseshit. The original question had already been answered. I
commented on the drift. -aem

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 11-05-2005, 03:21 PM
Shaun aRe
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Shaun a Dimwit scrawled:
"Sheldon" wrote:
Stressed wrote:
If you scrub the mold off of a potato, is it ok to eat? I say no,

my
husband thinks it's alright. Thank you.


Potatoes are subject to myriad diseases.

A common tuber disease is Rhizoctonia or black scurf. This fungal
disease is characterized by small, irregular black patches on the

tuber
surface. These patches, called "sclerotia,"


Are you *certain* you have the right word there?


"Are you *certain* you have the correct reference there... dictionarys
are notoriously worthless for abstractions."

Yes, I'm certain I have the definition correct.
"n. pl. scle·ro·ti·a (-sh-, -sh)
A dense mass of branched hyphae, as in certain fungi, that contain

stored
food and are capable of remaining dormant for long periods.

[New Latin, from Greek sklrots, hardness, from sklros, hard.]"

Truffles are sclerotia.


"Uni-dimensional thinking... can't even comprehend his own reference..."

My question of you was not an accusation, it was a request for
clarification. The mold you described jarred with the definition of
sclerotia I had come across - I wanted to be sure you used the right word in
that context, so that I could ad that information to memory and therefore
broaden my knowledge base.

Now, if of course you would care to, could you explain how the above applies
to this potato mold? I really am genuinely curious - as I said previously,
I'm a bit of a (admittedly very amateur) fungiphile.

"did anyone ever tell you that you are functionally illiterate, you are
you know, most definitely... you've just demonstated that you have the
IQ of a potato, mashed. You're way too dumb to succeed at being a LOUD
MOUTH. I'm positive yours is the lowest IQ of all who've subscribed to
rfc during the past five year period."

No Sheldon, only you, but it's more or less the same formulaic response you
fire off to people here on a reagular basis, and it doesn't bother me in the
least. ',;~}~

I must admit though to being a little upset, that you didn't even put in one
half of a new thought before you attempted your (f)laming of me. Sniffle
;-(


"Typical internet/usenet Newbie,
with hair trigger keyboard."

Ha! Hilarious - I ask you a question, you fire off (as you so often do) your
little tirade, then accuse me of having a hair trigger keyboard. You do
realise the irony of that, don't you Shelly-Welly?

"Didn't yer momma teach you to put
pea-brain into gear before opening yap."

Sigh If only she'd have been your mother too, maybe she would have also
taught you to do such.

"Had only you'd known how to do
an internet search for potato diseases. DUH"

There's a 'zillion' of em:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/pubs/scurf.html

http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.corne...hizoctonia.htm

Thanks for the links - I will take a look at them shortly - I'm sure I will
find the information both interesting and informative. However if I do not,
I will come right back here and mercilessly flame the living shit out of you
of course, but surely you would expect no less of me, nor would I expect you
to give any less were the tables turned. ',;~}~

"Sheldon (grows/knows spuds)"

Good for you! We grow them too, only for ourselves mind you, but we do
rather well.

While this is on my mind, may I pick yours for a little information
regarding growing potatoes?

We were told (rather my wife was while studying horticulture) not to waste
our time and money buying commercial 'seed potatoes' (we're only talking
small grows here, allotment grows etc. if this makes a difference), rather
to just buy the kind we liked at a s/market, and plant those when they went
to seed. He gave her his reasons, and since then, experimenting has backed
up that reasoning.

Various types of commercial seed potatoes, planted at different times and
different locations, when compared to store bought ones in the same
situations, yielded comparatively poorly, suffered much more from disease,
and were attacked rather heavily by pests. The crops were also poorer in
flavour (with the crops from the store bought having vastly more flavour
than the originals too).

Could you, if you please, elucidate as to why this is/maybe, and also, with
the above (at least seemingly) being the case, why do people still buy
expensive seed potatoes?

Cheers!



Shaun aRe
--
Living Life Large Like Loud Lemon Lipped Laughter.


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 11-05-2005, 03:49 PM
Sheldon
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Shaun aRe wrote:

While this is on my mind, may I pick yours for a little information
regarding growing potatoes?

We were told (rather my wife was while studying horticulture) not to

waste
our time and money buying commercial 'seed potatoes' (we're only

talking
small grows here, allotment grows etc. if this makes a difference),

rather
to just buy the kind we liked at a s/market, and plant those when

they went
to seed. He gave her his reasons, and since then, experimenting has

backed
up that reasoning.

Various types of commercial seed potatoes, planted at different times

and
different locations, when compared to store bought ones in the same
situations, yielded comparatively poorly, suffered much more from

disease,
and were attacked rather heavily by pests. The crops were also poorer

in
flavour (with the crops from the store bought having vastly more

flavour
than the originals too).

Could you, if you please, elucidate as to why this is/maybe, and

also, with
the above (at least seemingly) being the case, why do people still

buy
expensive seed potatoes?


You're likely a cheap ******* and other folks are not...

Seed potatoes are treated with fungicides, insecticides, and hormones
to accelerate initial growth... as are most all veggie seed. Do not
eat or feed wildlife leftover veggie seed. Seed potatoes are not more
costly... and those from the stupidmarket are generally hybrids that
won't reproduce.

Small home gardens are not to save money, almost always costs more than
store bought... it's a hobby... I just added 15 yds of topsoil @ $400,
I'm already operating at a loss and I didn't even plant yet, first
gotta start up my $800 rototiller - it will never pay for itself. I've
been gardening all my life and have yet to save my first penny, have no
expectations I ever will.

Sheldon

 




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