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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Kosher salami



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 12:41 AM
cathy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Kosher salami

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 01:18 AM
Boron Elgar
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed soy
protein in it now.

Boron
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 02:07 AM
tuppy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed soy
protein in it now.

Boron


Try Vienna Beef Salami out of Chicago.


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 02:07 AM
Sheldon
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed soy
protein in it now.

Boron


There are a couple other brands, Issac Gellis, Shofar.

But none today are like the real kosher salami of yesteryear, back then
kosher salami did not need refrigeration, it was a fermented salami,
just hung from a hook at the deli... the older/aged ones dripped fat
until they were pretty dry, those were what you got when you asked for
"hard salami", and cost a few cents extra, well, they lost weight.

You really can't compare today's kosher delis to those from even forty
years ago... there is no comparison... today's kosher delis (every one
of them with no exceptions whatsoever) serve phony baloney. I'll only
believe you've ever eaten real kosher deli if you can tell me what's a
"toot".

Sheldon

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 02:12 AM
cathy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 20:18:50 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

I guess I wasn't clear. I know what all the different brands of kosher
salami are. What I meant was what kind of salami that =isn't= a kosher
salami might come the closest in taste and texture to a kosher salami.
Italian salami? Genoa salami? Summe sausage? Or one of the dozens of
other varieties I see in the deli case?

Cathy

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 03:17 AM
Sheldon
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


cathy wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 20:18:50 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

I guess I wasn't clear. I know what all the different brands of

kosher
salami are. What I meant was what kind of salami that =isn't= a

kosher
salami might come the closest in taste and texture to a kosher

salami.
Italian salami? Genoa salami? Summe sausage? Or one of the dozens of
other varieties I see in the deli case?

Cathy


None.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 12:19 PM
Boron Elgar
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 01:12:02 GMT, cathy
wrote:

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 20:18:50 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

I guess I wasn't clear. I know what all the different brands of kosher
salami are. What I meant was what kind of salami that =isn't= a kosher
salami might come the closest in taste and texture to a kosher salami.
Italian salami? Genoa salami? Summe sausage? Or one of the dozens of
other varieties I see in the deli case?

Cathy



I cannot think of any.

You might actually want to experiment a bit with varieties of
kielbasa, if you can find a good Polish deli. Try one of the garlic
kielbasas. It won't be exactly the same as a kosher salami, but it
might remind you of one and it'll be damn good, nevertheless.

Boron
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 03:52 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


cathy wrote:
When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.


I believe that is the fourth rule.

Cam

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 05:45 PM
tuppy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy



The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed soy
protein in it now.

Boron


There are a couple other brands, Issac Gellis, Shofar.

But none today are like the real kosher salami of yesteryear, back then
kosher salami did not need refrigeration, it was a fermented salami,
just hung from a hook at the deli... the older/aged ones dripped fat
until they were pretty dry, those were what you got when you asked for
"hard salami", and cost a few cents extra, well, they lost weight.

You really can't compare today's kosher delis to those from even forty
years ago... there is no comparison... today's kosher delis (every one
of them with no exceptions whatsoever) serve phony baloney. I'll only
believe you've ever eaten real kosher deli if you can tell me what's a
"toot".

Sheldon

You can "hang" and dry Vienna's beef salami. Yes, it drips fat all over the
countertop. I have been doing that since the 1970's. I grew up in a strict
kosher household (and gave it up when I moved out) and can't tell you what a
toot is. I called a Hasidic friend of mine in Great Neck, NY and he couldn't
tell me either. What is a "toot?"

Rand


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 06:18 PM
Sheldon
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


tuppy wrote:
"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy


wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew

National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there

is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone

know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy


The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National

or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not

taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed

soy
protein in it now.

Boron


There are a couple other brands, Issac Gellis, Shofar.

But none today are like the real kosher salami of yesteryear, back

then
kosher salami did not need refrigeration, it was a fermented

salami,
just hung from a hook at the deli... the older/aged ones dripped

fat
until they were pretty dry, those were what you got when you asked

for
"hard salami", and cost a few cents extra, well, they lost weight.

You really can't compare today's kosher delis to those from even

forty
years ago... there is no comparison... today's kosher delis (every

one
of them with no exceptions whatsoever) serve phony baloney. I'll

only
believe you've ever eaten real kosher deli if you can tell me

what's a
"toot".

Sheldon

You can "hang" and dry Vienna's beef salami. Yes, it drips fat all

over the
countertop. I have been doing that since the 1970's. I grew up in a

strict
kosher household (and gave it up when I moved out) and can't tell you

what a
toot is. I called a Hasidic friend of mine in Great Neck, NY and he

couldn't
tell me either. What is a "toot?"


Hasidics wouldn't have a clue about kosher delis... they don't frequent
them. And as to a "toot", I ain't giving it up... you either know or
you don't... if you grew up in a kosher home and don't know you're
probably fairly young.

Vienna Beef products are not kosher.

Not a very informative website: http://www.viennabeef.com/welcome1.htm

Sheldon

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 11:08 PM
tuppy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

tuppy wrote:
"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy


wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew

National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there

is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone

know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy


The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National

or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not

taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed

soy
protein in it now.

Boron

There are a couple other brands, Issac Gellis, Shofar.

But none today are like the real kosher salami of yesteryear, back

then
kosher salami did not need refrigeration, it was a fermented

salami,
just hung from a hook at the deli... the older/aged ones dripped

fat
until they were pretty dry, those were what you got when you asked

for
"hard salami", and cost a few cents extra, well, they lost weight.

You really can't compare today's kosher delis to those from even

forty
years ago... there is no comparison... today's kosher delis (every

one
of them with no exceptions whatsoever) serve phony baloney. I'll

only
believe you've ever eaten real kosher deli if you can tell me

what's a
"toot".

Sheldon

You can "hang" and dry Vienna's beef salami. Yes, it drips fat all

over the
countertop. I have been doing that since the 1970's. I grew up in a

strict
kosher household (and gave it up when I moved out) and can't tell you

what a
toot is. I called a Hasidic friend of mine in Great Neck, NY and he

couldn't
tell me either. What is a "toot?"


Hasidics wouldn't have a clue about kosher delis... they don't frequent
them. And as to a "toot", I ain't giving it up... you either know or
you don't... if you grew up in a kosher home and don't know you're
probably fairly young.

Vienna Beef products are not kosher.

Not a very informative website: http://www.viennabeef.com/welcome1.htm

Sheldon


I never said Vienna beef salami is kosher but their beef salami has no pork
nor pork derived products.. With regard to Hasidic not having a clue about
kosher delis, respectfully you don't know what you are talking about.
Hasidic and other orthodox friends of mine and I have gone to kosher NY
delis since probably about the time you were born. Yes, I am a young 53.


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 11:19 PM
cathy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 14 Apr 2005 10:18:00 -0700, "Sheldon" wrote:


tuppy wrote:
"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy


wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew

National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there

is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone

know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy


The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National

or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not

taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed

soy
protein in it now.

Boron

There are a couple other brands, Issac Gellis, Shofar.

But none today are like the real kosher salami of yesteryear, back

then
kosher salami did not need refrigeration, it was a fermented

salami,
just hung from a hook at the deli... the older/aged ones dripped

fat
until they were pretty dry, those were what you got when you asked

for
"hard salami", and cost a few cents extra, well, they lost weight.

You really can't compare today's kosher delis to those from even

forty
years ago... there is no comparison... today's kosher delis (every

one
of them with no exceptions whatsoever) serve phony baloney. I'll

only
believe you've ever eaten real kosher deli if you can tell me

what's a
"toot".

Sheldon

You can "hang" and dry Vienna's beef salami. Yes, it drips fat all

over the
countertop. I have been doing that since the 1970's. I grew up in a

strict
kosher household (and gave it up when I moved out) and can't tell you

what a
toot is. I called a Hasidic friend of mine in Great Neck, NY and he

couldn't
tell me either. What is a "toot?"


Hasidics wouldn't have a clue about kosher delis... they don't frequent
them. And as to a "toot", I ain't giving it up... you either know or
you don't... if you grew up in a kosher home and don't know you're
probably fairly young.

Vienna Beef products are not kosher.

Not a very informative website: http://www.viennabeef.com/welcome1.htm


I didn't grow up in a kosher home - my mother did and swore she'd
never do it when she got married. But certain things stick with you,
lile; both my parents drank their coffee black (to avoid mixing dairy
and meat - you can't have cream in your coffee if your having brisket
for dinner, in a kosher home). My mother rarely made ham, and bacon
was not often found in our refrigerator. We stuck to kosher-style
products, like HN salami and hot dogs because they were the flavors my
parents were accustomed to. It's stuck with me, too, because the only
hot dogs I'll eat are kosher style. The one time I ate an Oscar Mayer
hot dog I took one bite and spit it out, and tossed the rest in the
trash. It was one of the more revolting things I've been served. It
was so foreign to what I expected a hot dog to taste like, I couldn't
stand it.

Cathy

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 11:27 PM
Arri London
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



tuppy wrote:

"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 23:41:24 GMT, cathy
wrote:

When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy


The closest you will get to it in most markets is Hebrew National or
Best's.

HN is still made, though it belongs to ConAgra now & does not taste
nearly as good as it used to. It has flavorings and hydrolyzed soy
protein in it now.

Boron


There are a couple other brands, Issac Gellis, Shofar.

But none today are like the real kosher salami of yesteryear, back then
kosher salami did not need refrigeration, it was a fermented salami,
just hung from a hook at the deli... the older/aged ones dripped fat
until they were pretty dry, those were what you got when you asked for
"hard salami", and cost a few cents extra, well, they lost weight.

You really can't compare today's kosher delis to those from even forty
years ago... there is no comparison... today's kosher delis (every one
of them with no exceptions whatsoever) serve phony baloney. I'll only
believe you've ever eaten real kosher deli if you can tell me what's a
"toot".

Sheldon

You can "hang" and dry Vienna's beef salami. Yes, it drips fat all over the
countertop. I have been doing that since the 1970's. I grew up in a strict
kosher household (and gave it up when I moved out) and can't tell you what a
toot is. I called a Hasidic friend of mine in Great Neck, NY and he couldn't
tell me either. What is a "toot?"

Rand


Taken from a German word for 'bag'. Means a twisted bit of paper to hold
mustard, separate from the sandwich.
Has nothing to do with eating 'real' kosher deli.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2005, 11:47 PM
Charles Gifford
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"cathy" wrote in message
...
When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy


Would not a kosher salami of any type taste the same as any salami of that
same type? It may be kosher but that has little or nothing to do with it's
taste or texture, non? I assume, also, that a HB salami would be of a
generic "American" salami nature rather than a specific type of salami.

Charliam


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2005, 12:29 AM
Sheldon
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Charles Gifford wrote:
"cathy" wrote in message
...
When I was a kid the only salami we ever bought was Hebrew National
kosher salami.

When you go to the deli counter in the market these days there is a
mind-boggling array of salamis sp? and sausages. Does anyone know
what type/style of salami/sausage would be closest in flavor and
texture to a kosher salami?

Thanks,
Cathy


Would not a kosher salami of any type taste the same as any salami of

that
same type? It may be kosher but that has little or nothing to do with

it's
taste or texture, non? I assume, also, that a HB salami would be of a
generic "American" salami nature rather than a specific type of

salami.

Charliam


Kosher salami is essentially of only one type, whereas each recipe
varies, but so insignificantly as to be deemed negligible. There is
also kosher bologna, kosher hot dogs, and kosher knockwurst, all of
which vary only very slightly by brand. I know of no kosher salami
that is like say genoa. And I know of no kosher kielbasa... those who
keep kosher are not at all interested in provisions that emulate those
containing pork, regardless they're kosher. And kosher is like
pregnant, either is or ain't... no such thing as almost...

Sheldon

 




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