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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Best Foods/Hellmans Mayonnaise



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 01:36 AM
Charles Gifford
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Posts: n/a
Default Best Foods/Hellmans Mayonnaise

When I first heard reports here that BF/Hellmans had changed the recipe for
their mayonnaise I was incredulous. I didn't believe it. I was wrong. The
last few jars of BF mayonnaise I have purchased have been almost nasty. It
doesn't taste the same. By the time I get to the bottom of the jar, the
mayonnaise is almost liquid!

Since I was a child, Best Foods Mayonnaise was one thing that a person could
count on in this world to be stable and constant. I am now shaken to the
core!

I apologize to all who first spoke out about this outrage and whom I jeered
at the time. It was my favorite. I will try Duke's again to see if I still
like that mayonnaise. A curse upon the multi-national corpse-eration that
owns Best Foods/Hellmans!

Charlie


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 01:42 AM
Curly Sue
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 00:36:44 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
wrote:

When I first heard reports here that BF/Hellmans had changed the recipe for
their mayonnaise I was incredulous. I didn't believe it. I was wrong. The
last few jars of BF mayonnaise I have purchased have been almost nasty. It
doesn't taste the same. By the time I get to the bottom of the jar, the
mayonnaise is almost liquid!

Since I was a child, Best Foods Mayonnaise was one thing that a person could
count on in this world to be stable and constant. I am now shaken to the
core!

I apologize to all who first spoke out about this outrage and whom I jeered
at the time. It was my favorite. I will try Duke's again to see if I still
like that mayonnaise. A curse upon the multi-national corpse-eration that
owns Best Foods/Hellmans!

Charlie


Did you by chance get a jar made in Canada? One of my local stores
gets Canadian Hellman's every so often. I got it once and had to toss
it out. Now I'm very careful about looking for where it was made.

I compared the ingredients list and they were different. I called the
company and the rep was unaware of the difference. She gave me the
800 number for Canadian Hellman's but I never followed up.


Sue(tm)
Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 03:16 AM
Sam D.
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Charles Gifford" wrote in message
ink.net...
When I first heard reports here that BF/Hellmans had changed the

recipe for
their mayonnaise I was incredulous. I didn't believe it. I was

wrong. The
last few jars of BF mayonnaise I have purchased have been almost

nasty. It
doesn't taste the same. By the time I get to the bottom of the jar,

the
mayonnaise is almost liquid!

Since I was a child, Best Foods Mayonnaise was one thing that a

person could
count on in this world to be stable and constant. I am now shaken to

the
core!

I apologize to all who first spoke out about this outrage and whom I

jeered
at the time. It was my favorite. I will try Duke's again to see if I

still
like that mayonnaise. A curse upon the multi-national corpse-eration

that
owns Best Foods/Hellmans!


I wasn't aware of the change. I just finished off a qt. jar of BF mayo
but I didn't notice a difference. When did this take place?

I alternate between BF and Kraft mayo, depending on which is the
better deal at the time. I have found either brand to be OK with me.


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 08:00 AM
ScratchMonkey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Sam D." wrote in news:10vgjofn1gu97c2
@corp.supernews.com:

I wasn't aware of the change. I just finished off a qt. jar of BF mayo
but I didn't notice a difference. When did this take place?


http://groups-
beta.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/browse_frm/thread/4dc4f0ec8903dd4b/3
19050e3cc1c8d78?q=hellmans+best+foods&_done=%2Fgro ups%3Fq%
3Dhellmans+best+foods%26&_doneTitle=Back+to+Search &&d#319050e3cc1c8d78

I first noticed it in 2002 but apparently it started a couple years before
that.

I alternate between BF and Kraft mayo, depending on which is the
better deal at the time. I have found either brand to be OK with me.


The original Best Foods, before the Unilever acquisition, had vinegar high
on the ingredients list. Kraft was quite bland in comparison because it had
less acidity. My theory is that, with no one more acidic than BF, Unilever
could move towards a less acidic formulation and hope to capture some of
Kraft's market. Who would the BF junkies switch to?

The Mexican "Limon" variant of BF (with the orange lid) is much closer to
the original formula. I've also found it effective to stir in a little
white vinegar.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 09:52 AM
Daisy
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 00:36:44 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
wrote:

When I first heard reports here that BF/Hellmans had changed the recipe for
their mayonnaise I was incredulous. I didn't believe it. I was wrong. The
last few jars of BF mayonnaise I have purchased have been almost nasty. It
doesn't taste the same. By the time I get to the bottom of the jar, the
mayonnaise is almost liquid!

Since I was a child, Best Foods Mayonnaise was one thing that a person could
count on in this world to be stable and constant. I am now shaken to the
core!

I apologize to all who first spoke out about this outrage and whom I jeered
at the time. It was my favorite. I will try Duke's again to see if I still
like that mayonnaise. A curse upon the multi-national corpse-eration that
owns Best Foods/Hellmans!

Charlie

Any store-bought mayonnaise is a very poor substitute for the genuine
home-made variety. Likewise vinagrette dressings.

Just make your own. The manufacturers put all sorts of awful things
in these products.

Daisy
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 12:49 PM
Siobhan Perricone
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 21:52:47 +1300, Daisy wrote:

Just make your own. The manufacturers put all sorts of awful things
in these products.


Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily, and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it every time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to do in
their busy lives.

There's nothing wrong with finding ways to cut corners, and your feelings
about the taste of store bought mayo aren't necessarily universal, either.
I happen to like Hellman's mayo.

In response to the thread, I've not noticed any change in my Hellman's at
all. I'm up in Vermont.

--
Siobhan Perricone
Humans wrote the bible,
God wrote the rocks
-- Word of God by Kathy Mar
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 05:05 PM
Vox Humana
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Siobhan Perricone" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 21:52:47 +1300, Daisy wrote:

Just make your own. The manufacturers put all sorts of awful things
in these products.


Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily, and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it every time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to do in
their busy lives.


My experience differs. I find mayo very easy to make and very quick. I
just take a couple eggs from the frig and put them in the food processor. I
add a splash of vinegar, some salt and pepper, and maybe a little Dijon
mustard. I turn the machine on and start adding the oil. Within a minute,
I have an emulsion and another minute I have about a cup of mayo that is far
better than anything I have ever bought in the supermarket. The total cost
is about 15 cents. I have never had it break. I agree that it probably
shouldn't be kept for more that two weeks. I guess the decision rests on
how much and how often you use mayo. Of course, if you don't have a food
process or blender, then making it would be difficult.


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 06:42 PM
Scott
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Siobhan Perricone wrote:

Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily, and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it every time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to do in
their busy lives.



Come again? I've made it a bunch of times and always found it easy to
do. I've never had it break down, despite using a single batch for about
two weeks (starting with pasteurized eggs). I end up tossing it--not
because it breaks down or goes bad, but because I don't use mayo all
that often and I'm just being careful.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 07:37 PM
Sam D.
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Siobhan Perricone wrote:

Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even

with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily,

and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the

store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let

it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it

every time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to

do in
their busy lives.



Come again? I've made it a bunch of times and always found it easy

to
do. I've never had it break down, despite using a single batch for

about
two weeks (starting with pasteurized eggs). I end up tossing it--not
because it breaks down or goes bad, but because I don't use mayo all
that often and I'm just being careful.


I agree that mayo is easy and economical to make but also homemade
mayo has no where near the shelf life in the fridge as does the
commercial product. I'll make if I'm going to be using a quantity of
it right away but usually I depend on the BF or Kraft product.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 07:43 PM
Fifo
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Siobhan Perricone wrote:
On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 21:52:47 +1300, Daisy

wrote:

Just make your own. The manufacturers put all sorts of awful things
in these products.


Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even

with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily,

and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the

store.

If the mayo seperates it is very easy to repair it. Just seperate
another yolk in a clean bowl and add the sperated mayo one spoonfull at
a time stirring constantly. Stirr in circles and only in one direction.


As far as storage goes, I wouldn't store home-made mayo for more than
3-4 days and would definitely keep it in the fridge. Personally, I
think if you are using the mayo for sauces or salads, it's worth doing
it from scratch. Otherwise nothing wrong with the store variety.

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 08:42 PM
Emil
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Why ["starting with pasteurized eggs"] a waste of time and really not much
sense in today's world of food going from one end of the country to another
in 3 days at most.
I think that is being too careful.


--
Emil

"Sam D." wrote in message
...

"Scott" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Siobhan Perricone wrote:

Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even

with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily,

and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the

store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let

it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it

every time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to

do in
their busy lives.



Come again? I've made it a bunch of times and always found it easy

to
do. I've never had it break down, despite using a single batch for

about
two weeks (starting with pasteurized eggs). I end up tossing it--not
because it breaks down or goes bad, but because I don't use mayo all
that often and I'm just being careful.


I agree that mayo is easy and economical to make but also homemade
mayo has no where near the shelf life in the fridge as does the
commercial product. I'll make if I'm going to be using a quantity of
it right away but usually I depend on the BF or Kraft product.




  #12 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 09:32 PM
Scott
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Emil" wrote:

Why ["starting with pasteurized eggs"] a waste of time and really not much
sense in today's world of food going from one end of the country to another
in 3 days at most.
I think that is being too careful.


I'm not sure what you're talking about. What's "not much sense in sense
in today's world of food going from one end of the country to another in
3 days at most?"

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 27-01-2005, 09:50 PM
Fifo
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Scott wrote:
In article ,
"Emil" wrote:

Why ["starting with pasteurized eggs"] a waste of time and really

not much
sense in today's world of food going from one end of the country to

another
in 3 days at most.
I think that is being too careful.


I'm not sure what you're talking about. What's "not much sense in

sense
in today's world of food going from one end of the country to another

in
3 days at most?"


As you probably understood, Emil is arguing that there is no need for
the eggs to be pasteurized since the eggs sold in the supermarkets are
fresh. As you are probably implying, "fresh", does not mean that the
eggs will be free of salmonella. The following is a quote from the
Georgia Egg Commission which explains both the danger and how miniscule
it is:

"Salmonella enteritidis (S.e.) is the bacteria most commonly associated
with eggs. Scientists estimate that, on average, across the United
States, only 1 of every 20,000 might contain the bacteria, so the
likelihood that an egg might contain S.e. is extremely small (five
one-thousandths of one percent). At this rate, even if you're an
average consumer, you might encounter a contaminated egg once very 84
years!

And, if you keep your egg dish cold (40 degrees or lower) bacteria
growth will be retarded. If you keep the dish hot (140 degrees or
hotter), any bacteria present, will be killed."

It seems to me that there is no need to pasteurize the eggs BUT
everyone has their own risk tollerance. This is probably a good
opportunity for having the good old unpasteurized cheese discussion.

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2005, 12:04 AM
Siobhan Perricone
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 12:42:42 -0500, Scott
wrote:

In article ,
Siobhan Perricone wrote:

Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily, and is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it every time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to do in
their busy lives.



Come again? I've made it a bunch of times and always found it easy to
do. I've never had it break down, despite using a single batch for about
two weeks (starting with pasteurized eggs). I end up tossing it--not
because it breaks down or goes bad, but because I don't use mayo all
that often and I'm just being careful.


Fair enough. I bow to the superior experience of others.

--
Siobhan Perricone
Humans wrote the bible,
God wrote the rocks
-- Word of God by Kathy Mar
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 28-01-2005, 12:10 AM
Vox Humana
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Siobhan Perricone" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 12:42:42 -0500, Scott
wrote:

In article ,
Siobhan Perricone wrote:

Mayo is one of those things that is hard to make, not simple (even with
Alton's help in explaining the details on it . It breaks easily, and

is
nowhere near as stable or long-lasting as the stuff you get at the

store.
So you can't whip up a large batch of it with confidence and let it sit
around in you fridge for when you need it. You have to make it every

time
you need it. That's prohibitive to most people who have a lot to do in
their busy lives.



Come again? I've made it a bunch of times and always found it easy to
do. I've never had it break down, despite using a single batch for about
two weeks (starting with pasteurized eggs). I end up tossing it--not
because it breaks down or goes bad, but because I don't use mayo all
that often and I'm just being careful.


Fair enough. I bow to the superior experience of others.


If you haven't tried it because it intimidated you, give it a try. I find
it magical when suddenly, eggs and oil turn into the most luscious mayo.
Before I started making my own, I really didn't care for mayo.


 




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