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Montreal Smoked Meat Recipe



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2005, 10:58 PM
Alexandre
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Default Montreal Smoked Meat Recipe

For you, Veronica, and for all of you who can't get the real Montreal
Smoked Meat, here's a recipe to make it from scratch.

My mother saw it on a Québécois cooking show called Bon Appétit, she
made it, and it was delicious. Very close to the deli Smoke Meat, but
not smoked.

One 5 lb piece of beef brisket (fat trimmed, if you are health
couscious)
1/2 c. sugar
2 tablespoons sodium nitrate (salpêtre, the curing agent, which can be
found in a drugstore).
1/2 cup kosher or pickling salt
1/2 c. ground allspice.
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
100 grams pickle spices (a prepared mix of coriander seeds and various
other spices).

--------------
1. Mix all the spices
2. Put half of the spice mixture on a thick sheet of aluminium foil.
3. Put the brisket on the spices, make superficial diagonal cuts on
top of it and rub the rest of the spice mixture on it.
4. Wrap hermetically in the foil and put in the fridge for FIVE DAYS
(no shortcut here!).
5. Cook in oven (300 F / 160 C) or in slowcooker for FIVE HOURS.
6. Scrap off the spices and cut the meat (in diagonal) in paper thin
slices.
7. Pile high on good rye bread with dijon mustard, serve with pickles
on the side and cherry coke (Dr Pepper?) and enjoy!

The smoked meat will keep (and improve!) u to 3 weeks in the fridge.

Caveat: this type of deli meat is cheap to make and low in fat, but
eat with moderation anyway: 'Nitrites can lead to the formation of
nitrosamines, which in animals have been shown to be carcinogenic.'

Make sure to drink tea, apple juice or tomato juice before (or after)
your smoked meat sandwich: they have been shown to inhibit the
formation of nitrosamines and prevent carcinogenic effects.
(See: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=Mo...nts.com&rnum=1)

-Alexandre
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2005, 09:03 PM
Louis Cohen
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alexandre wrote:
For you, Veronica, and for all of you who can't get the real Montreal
Smoked Meat, here's a recipe to make it from scratch.

My mother saw it on a Québécois cooking show called Bon Appétit, she
made it, and it was delicious. Very close to the deli Smoke Meat, but
not smoked.

One 5 lb piece of beef brisket (fat trimmed, if you are health
couscious)
1/2 c. sugar
2 tablespoons sodium nitrate (salpêtre, the curing agent, which can be
found in a drugstore).
1/2 cup kosher or pickling salt
1/2 c. ground allspice.
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
100 grams pickle spices (a prepared mix of coriander seeds and various
other spices).

--------------
1. Mix all the spices
2. Put half of the spice mixture on a thick sheet of aluminium foil.
3. Put the brisket on the spices, make superficial diagonal cuts on
top of it and rub the rest of the spice mixture on it.
4. Wrap hermetically in the foil and put in the fridge for FIVE DAYS
(no shortcut here!).
5. Cook in oven (300 F / 160 C) or in slowcooker for FIVE HOURS.
6. Scrap off the spices and cut the meat (in diagonal) in paper thin
slices.
7. Pile high on good rye bread with dijon mustard, serve with pickles
on the side and cherry coke (Dr Pepper?) and enjoy!

The smoked meat will keep (and improve!) u to 3 weeks in the fridge.

Caveat: this type of deli meat is cheap to make and low in fat, but
eat with moderation anyway: 'Nitrites can lead to the formation of
nitrosamines, which in animals have been shown to be carcinogenic.'

Make sure to drink tea, apple juice or tomato juice before (or after)
your smoked meat sandwich: they have been shown to inhibit the
formation of nitrosamines and prevent carcinogenic effects.
(See: http://groups.google.com/groups?q=Mo...nts.com&rnum=1)

-Alexandre

This clearly isn't smoked meat, it's corned beef (and there's nothing
wrong with that). You can just leave the sodium nirate out if you don't
mind losing the pink color. Here's a similar approach:

http://www.zenreich.com/ZenWeb/cornedbeef.htm

If you have a covered grill, or stovetop smoker, or a wok with a lid,
there's no reason why you can't smoke the resulting corned beef. I
suppose you could even use a regular stewpot:

- line the inside of the pot (preferably an old, junky one) with
aluminum foil

- put smoking material (wood chips, or salt, sugar, and tea for Chinese
style) on the bottom of the pot

- put a steamer in the pot, or anything else you can rig up to hold a
plate off the bottom of the pot; put the meat on a plate on the steamer.

- heat up the pot (covered) until you get smoke; turn the heat down to
maintain the smoke

Don't try this indoors without a good hood.

--

================================================== =============
Regards

Louis Cohen

"Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"

Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2005, 03:01 AM
D.A.Martinich
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Louis Cohen wrote:


If you have a covered grill, or stovetop smoker, or a wok with a lid,


there's no reason why you can't smoke the resulting corned beef. I
suppose you could even use a regular stewpot:

- line the inside of the pot (preferably an old, junky one) with
aluminum foil

- put smoking material (wood chips, or salt, sugar, and tea for

Chinese
style) on the bottom of the pot

- put a steamer in the pot, or anything else you can rig up to hold a


plate off the bottom of the pot; put the meat on a plate on the

steamer.

- heat up the pot (covered) until you get smoke; turn the heat down

to
maintain the smoke

Don't try this indoors without a good hood.


Before you start the smoking process, apply a rub made of black pepper,
crushed coriander seed, paprika, and garlic powder.

D.M.

 




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