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Questions about the "pork" smell with pork



 
 
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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 02:38 PM
Ross Reid
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Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?


I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


You are probably a person who is more sensitive to what is called
‘boar taint’.
In some pig farming operations, male pigs are not castrated and the
meat from some entire male pigs has an unpleasant taint or odour.
The difficulty lies in determining which meat is from an entire boar
and which from a gilt, when it is on display in the butcher's case.
Ross.
To email, remove the "obvious" from my address.
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 02:38 PM
Ross Reid
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Default

Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?


I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


You are probably a person who is more sensitive to what is called
‘boar taint’.
In some pig farming operations, male pigs are not castrated and the
meat from some entire male pigs has an unpleasant taint or odour.
The difficulty lies in determining which meat is from an entire boar
and which from a gilt, when it is on display in the butcher's case.
Ross.
To email, remove the "obvious" from my address.
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 06:43 PM
Dark Skies
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 18:26:18 -0000, Bubbabob
wrote:

Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?



No. Never.

At least it doesn't taste like chicken.

  #19 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 06:49 PM
Nancy Young
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Default

Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?

I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


Sounds like my serious aversion to the smell of raw chicken in the
microwave. Smells like peanut butter. Funny thing, I don't mind the
smell of peanut butter unless it's chicken. It's forbidden in this
house, I can tell you that.

nancy
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 07:48 PM
Steve Lee
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 00:50:03 -0500, " BOB" wrote:

Steve Lee wrote:
I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?


I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


Use proper refrigeration?


Oh, I do though. I keep a thermometer in my fridgerator and it's
usually kept right around 2C - 3C (35F - 37F). I also cook the pork
the day I buy it or the very next day. Never longer than that with
pork, even with strict and proper refrigeration.
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 07:49 PM
Steve Lee
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Default

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 08:35:17 -0600, Katra
wrote:

In article ,
Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?


I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


I know what you mean...
I tend to run into this problem when I make shoulder roasts.

I stab the roast all over now and sliver garlic cloves and slip the
slivers of garlic into the stabs. I then top with various herbs before
roasting.

That has eliminated the "musty" porky overtone, especially once the
roast leftovers cool and get re-sliced for later serving.

The garlic pretty well eliminates it. :-)

Just my 2 cents!


Thanks for your input, Katra. Really appreciate it. I think I'll try
to use more garlic and see what happens from now on.
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 07:51 PM
Steve Lee
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 09:38:03 -0500, Ross Reid
wrote:

Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?


I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


You are probably a person who is more sensitive to what is called
‘boar taint’.
In some pig farming operations, male pigs are not castrated and the
meat from some entire male pigs has an unpleasant taint or odour.
The difficulty lies in determining which meat is from an entire boar
and which from a gilt, when it is on display in the butcher's case.
Ross.


Thanks for this explanation, Ross. It's always nice to get the nitty
gritty explanation behind these things. Very Alton Brownish :-) I'll
talk to the butchers at the meatshops I patronize and see if they have
any info for me on this. Thanks again.
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 08:18 PM
Katra
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Default

In article ,
Steve Lee wrote:

On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 08:35:17 -0600, Katra
wrote:

In article ,
Steve Lee wrote:

I know this sounds like an odd question and of course pork is supposed
to smell like pork, but please bear with me on this one.

Sometimes when I cook pork, I get that strong, what I can only
describe it as being the "pork" smell. It's that smell from the
cooked pork that's too strong to handle. Just the right amount and
you know you're eating pork, but when it gets too strong, I can't
handle it and it's another dinner ruined for me. Have any of you
encoutered this before?


I've tried different meat shops and markets, but I often encounter
this problem in my dishes with pork and I'm wondering if there's
something I'm doing wrong or not doing to avoid this.

Do any of you have suggestions to reduce the possibility of a too
strong porky smell in your pork dishes? Thanks for your time and
courtesy.


I know what you mean...
I tend to run into this problem when I make shoulder roasts.

I stab the roast all over now and sliver garlic cloves and slip the
slivers of garlic into the stabs. I then top with various herbs before
roasting.

That has eliminated the "musty" porky overtone, especially once the
roast leftovers cool and get re-sliced for later serving.

The garlic pretty well eliminates it. :-)

Just my 2 cents!


Thanks for your input, Katra. Really appreciate it. I think I'll try
to use more garlic and see what happens from now on.


Welcome!!! :-)
At the beef prices nowadays, pork is a good alternative and it's easier
for dad to eat since he has bad teeth and refuses to go to a dentist
even tho' I've offered to pay for it! sigh

A neat trick with herb toppings for roasts is to use a moist veggie on
top. If the herbs are kept moist, the flavor will also soak into the
stabs. I layer rosemary, basil and thyme over the top, then lay bok choy
leaves over that. The bok choy keeps the herbs from drying out during
roasting.

For pork chops and stuff fried or pan broiled, I use a liberal amount of
olive oil, then flavor with salt free lemon pepper, garlic powder and
onion powder, and lately, shitake mushroom powder that I make myself
from dehydrated/dried shitakes from the thai store. ;-d

If I am grilling, I marinate the chops ahead of time in my current
mood/choice of wishbone salad dressings. Italian or honey dijon work
well. I generally will start the marinating the night before so they
soak for a good 12 to 16 hours at 40 degrees F.

Grill over mesquite coals.

Happy cooking!!!
--
K.

Sprout the MungBean to reply

"I don't like to commit myself about heaven and hell--you
see, I have friends in both places." --Mark Twain
  #27 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 08:48 PM
Katra
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Default

In article ,
Sheryl Rosen wrote:

in article , Katra at
wrote on 11/27/04 9:35 AM:

I stab the roast all over now and sliver garlic cloves and slip the
slivers of garlic into the stabs. I then top with various herbs before
roasting.

That has eliminated the "musty" porky overtone, especially once the
roast leftovers cool and get re-sliced for later serving.

The garlic pretty well eliminates it. :-)

Just my 2 cents!


I just bought a 3.5 lb half a pork shoulder (it says "picnic") @ 79 cents a
pound.

I knew I wanted to roast it, after marinading it in mojo (it's from a
bottle....Badia brand. A fine purveyor of Caribbean seasonings based in
Miami, available at my local supermarket), but I will do that garlic thing,
too.

Lots of garlic. Lots of black pepper.
The mojo...and let it sit overnight.
Then, I'll pat it dry and rub it all over with mexican oregano, rosemary,
chili powder mixed with a little bit of ground chipotle for kick.... and
roast that baby for....that's my question!

How long at 350 or 375 for a 3.5 lb pork shoulder, still on the bone?


That's a pretty small roast. :-)
I'd try it for 30 to 45 minutes at 350, then check it for done-ness by
taking a slice at it. I'm cautious as it's easy to cook a bit more if
undercooked. Overcook and it's ruined. :-P

One of these days, I need to invest in and learn to use a meat
thermometer. That takes the guesswork out of it....
--
K.

Sprout the MungBean to reply

"I don't like to commit myself about heaven and hell--you
see, I have friends in both places." --Mark Twain
  #28 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 08:50 PM
PENMART01
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Sheryl Rosen writes:

How long at 350 or 375 for a 3.5 lb pork shoulder, still on the bone?


Slow and long... 300dF, 2-3 hours



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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 09:01 PM
Ken Davey
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PENMART01 wrote:
Sheryl Rosen writes:

How long at 350 or 375 for a 3.5 lb pork shoulder, still on the bone?


Slow and long... 300dF, 2-3 hours

Might work but the taste would be akin to cardboard.


--
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 27-11-2004, 09:15 PM
Ida Slapter
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On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 15:38:18 -0500, Sheryl Rosen
wrote:

How long at 350 or 375 for a 3.5 lb pork shoulder, still on the bone?


Three hours...............and check to see if it shreds easily with
two forks. It should be off the bone at this point.


 




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