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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Lamb for gyros?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 01:38 PM
Zspider
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Default Lamb for gyros?

Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?

Thank you, Michael
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 03:15 PM
George Shirley
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Default

Zspider wrote:
Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?

Thank you, Michael


You can use either lamb or beef, I use beef because lamb is very
expensive in my area. The best gyros, aka shwarmas, the meat is sliced
thin, stacked on a vertical spit, roasted with a gas fire while the spit
turns moderately slow. As the meat gets done it is sliced straight down
and the pieces put in pita bread, or as they did in Saudi Arabia, on a
hot dog bun (surprisingly good that way). The spices on the ones I had
in the Middle East, Greece, and Israel were mixed in with the sauce. The
sauce was a type of mayo with the appropriate spices added to it. I
couldn't eat more than 4 or 5 at time back then. VBG

One of the best shwarmas I ever had was at the King David shwarma shop
in Amsterdam, just down the street from the Arthur Frommer Hotel and
very near the trolley stop I used for getting around town.

I'm sure you can find many recipes on line. If you can't find a decent
"Arabic spices" recipe drop me a line and I will copy a recipe out of my
Arabic foods cookbook.

George

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 03:15 PM
George Shirley
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Posts: n/a
Default

Zspider wrote:
Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?

Thank you, Michael


You can use either lamb or beef, I use beef because lamb is very
expensive in my area. The best gyros, aka shwarmas, the meat is sliced
thin, stacked on a vertical spit, roasted with a gas fire while the spit
turns moderately slow. As the meat gets done it is sliced straight down
and the pieces put in pita bread, or as they did in Saudi Arabia, on a
hot dog bun (surprisingly good that way). The spices on the ones I had
in the Middle East, Greece, and Israel were mixed in with the sauce. The
sauce was a type of mayo with the appropriate spices added to it. I
couldn't eat more than 4 or 5 at time back then. VBG

One of the best shwarmas I ever had was at the King David shwarma shop
in Amsterdam, just down the street from the Arthur Frommer Hotel and
very near the trolley stop I used for getting around town.

I'm sure you can find many recipes on line. If you can't find a decent
"Arabic spices" recipe drop me a line and I will copy a recipe out of my
Arabic foods cookbook.

George

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 03:19 PM
Louis Cohen
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Default

Lamb always comes out great on a rotisserie - if you have access to one, cut
little slits in a leg of lamb (preferably bone-in) and insert slice of
garlic. Rub on some olive oil and sprinkle oregano on the lamb and cook.

If you don't have a roto, just roast in the oven. If you have a boneless
leg, unroll it, put it between sheets of plastic wrap, and pound it to an
even thickness, and then grill it on the BBQ like a big steak or under the
broiler.

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Louis Cohen
Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"


"Zspider" wrote in message
om...
Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?

Thank you, Michael



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 03:19 PM
Louis Cohen
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lamb always comes out great on a rotisserie - if you have access to one, cut
little slits in a leg of lamb (preferably bone-in) and insert slice of
garlic. Rub on some olive oil and sprinkle oregano on the lamb and cook.

If you don't have a roto, just roast in the oven. If you have a boneless
leg, unroll it, put it between sheets of plastic wrap, and pound it to an
even thickness, and then grill it on the BBQ like a big steak or under the
broiler.

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Louis Cohen
Living la vida loca at N37° 43' 7.9" W122° 8' 42.8"


"Zspider" wrote in message
om...
Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?

Thank you, Michael



  #6 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 04:18 PM
notbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2004-11-23, George Shirley wrote:
Zspider wrote:


You can use either lamb or beef, I use beef because lamb is very
expensive in my area. The best gyros, aka shwarmas, the meat is sliced
thin, stacked on a vertical spit, roasted with a gas fire while the spit
turns moderately slow. As the meat gets done it is sliced straight down
and the pieces put in pita bread.....


All the gyro/shwarma meat I ever encountered on these spits in local eateries
looks like some kind of pre-ground processed meat product. It certainly
isn't leg of lamb. I've noticed a similar vertspit/procmeat thingie in
local taquerias. What are these?

nb
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 04:34 PM
Richard Kaszeta
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Default

notbob writes:
All the gyro/shwarma meat I ever encountered on these spits in local eateries
looks like some kind of pre-ground processed meat product. It certainly
isn't leg of lamb.


Yes, it's usually the infamous Kronos Gyrokone[tm],
http://www.kronosproducts.com/pages/products_frame.htm, or one of their competitors.

However, I do know of some gyro joints that do actual cuts of meat on
the spit, but they are a rare find.

I've noticed a similar vertspit/procmeat thingie in
local taquerias. What are these?


"Taco al pastor" is the classic Mexican-as-in-Mexico way of producing
the tacos. They are actually pork most of the time.

--
Richard W Kaszeta

http://www.kaszeta.org/rich
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 05:23 PM
Dave Smith
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Zspider wrote:

Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?


Gyros is ground lamb, spiced and baked in a pan. There were lots of
recipes for it available on the net.


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 05:23 PM
Dave Smith
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Zspider wrote:

Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?


Gyros is ground lamb, spiced and baked in a pan. There were lots of
recipes for it available on the net.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 05:53 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dave Smith writes:

Zspider wrote:

Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?


Gyros is ground lamb, spiced and baked in a pan.


Usually ground lamb but can also be beef/goat, but it's not baked in a pan...
gyro is roasted on a vertical *rotating* spit... rotating, hence the name
"gyro".

Oxford

gyro

noun (PL. -os) N. Amer. a sandwich made with slices of spiced meat cooked on a
spit, served with salad in pitta bread.

—ORIGIN 1970s: from modern Greek guros 'turning'.
---

---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 05:53 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dave Smith writes:

Zspider wrote:

Lamb is the usual meat in a gyros sandwich, isn't it? I did
a lamb shish kabob here recently that the family liked, but
besides that I don't have any experience with lamb.

How would I prepare lamb for gyros? When it finally goes on
the sandwich it is sliced thin, cooked dark, and seasoned
heavily. I'd like to try that!

If I'm clueless and lamb isn't what is used on a gyros, what
type of meat is and how should I prepare it?


Gyros is ground lamb, spiced and baked in a pan.


Usually ground lamb but can also be beef/goat, but it's not baked in a pan...
gyro is roasted on a vertical *rotating* spit... rotating, hence the name
"gyro".

Oxford

gyro

noun (PL. -os) N. Amer. a sandwich made with slices of spiced meat cooked on a
spit, served with salad in pitta bread.

—ORIGIN 1970s: from modern Greek guros 'turning'.
---

---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 06:03 PM
Becca
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Try using ground lamb, ground beef, cumin and lots of garlic.

Becca
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 06:03 PM
Becca
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Default

Try using ground lamb, ground beef, cumin and lots of garlic.

Becca
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 06:17 PM
Dave Smith
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMART01 wrote:


Gyros is ground lamb, spiced and baked in a pan.


Usually ground lamb but can also be beef/goat, but it's not baked in a pan...
gyro is roasted on a vertical *rotating* spit... rotating, hence the name
"gyro".


Most of the recipes that I found said to pack it into a loaf pan and bake it. One
suggested sticking a minimum 2 lb weight on it while cooling to compress it. Only
one of them suggested cooking it on a spit, but could also be done in a pan in the
oven. Personally, I was surprised to see the pan idea because I was used to
seeing it on a vertical spit, but those were commercially prepared and being
reheated.

Gyros is great stuff. It seems to be getting more popular here as people learn
about it. I have introduced at least a dozen people to them at local Greek
restaurants and only one person was not impressed.

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2004, 06:17 PM
Dave Smith
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMART01 wrote:


Gyros is ground lamb, spiced and baked in a pan.


Usually ground lamb but can also be beef/goat, but it's not baked in a pan...
gyro is roasted on a vertical *rotating* spit... rotating, hence the name
"gyro".


Most of the recipes that I found said to pack it into a loaf pan and bake it. One
suggested sticking a minimum 2 lb weight on it while cooling to compress it. Only
one of them suggested cooking it on a spit, but could also be done in a pan in the
oven. Personally, I was surprised to see the pan idea because I was used to
seeing it on a vertical spit, but those were commercially prepared and being
reheated.

Gyros is great stuff. It seems to be getting more popular here as people learn
about it. I have introduced at least a dozen people to them at local Greek
restaurants and only one person was not impressed.

 




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