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Turkey on America's Test Kitchen



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2011, 11:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 954
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

This America's Test Kitchen episode presents a new way, for me at least, to
brine turkey, sort of a "Dry Brine", on today's America's Test Kitchen on
PBS. Watch it today on TV or on the internet. Here's the link to the recipe.
http://www.americastestkitchen.com/r...hp?docid=20850

You put your fingers under the skin and separate skin from the meat
throughout most of the turkey, all of the breast, and most of the thigh.
Then you rub the meat under the skin with Kosher salt. This is sort of a
"dry brine," as it accomplishes what you're trying to do with the usual
brine. The show's chef created a stuffing in the usual fashion with homemade
croutons, and stuffed it into the salted body cavity on top of cheesecloth,
That makes it easy to remove all the stuffing at the end of the baking.

I haven't baked a turkey with the stuffing in the bird for more than twenty
years. I always make the stuffing on the side with homemade turkey stock.
I'm going to stuff the turkey and see how it goes.

The turkey is roasted oppositely from my usual way. The turkey goes into the
oven at 325F breast side down until the breast reaches 130F. Then the oven
temp. is raised to 450F; the turkey turned to breast side up and is finished
off to a thigh temp. of 175F.

I have some concerns, including the salt pork on the skin, the baking powder
on the skin, and use of chicken stock any where in the dish. I always have
turkey stock on hand. The baking powder on chicken skin was a disaster for
us recently.

I'm going to roast a rehearsal turkey tomorrow and I'm going to try this.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Kent





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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-11-2011, 11:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 7,705
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

Kent wrote:

I haven't baked a turkey with the stuffing in the bird for more than twenty
years.


I'm so sorry to hear that.
Hopefully you will do it this year and enjoy your stuffing even more.

I always say as a joke....take the turkey out of the oven, scoop out the
stuffing, then toss the turkey in the trash.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 02:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,501
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Nov 12, 4:11*pm, "Kent" wrote:


The turkey is roasted oppositely from my usual way. The turkey goes into the
oven at 325F breast side down until the breast reaches 130F. Then the oven
temp. is raised to 450F; the turkey turned to breast side up and is finished
off to a thigh temp. of 175F.



I'm going to roast a rehearsal turkey tomorrow and I'm going to try this.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Kent


I've seen this before, not the ATK version, of roasting a turkey
breast down and then flipping to brown. I just don't know if I'd want
to wrestle with a hot turkey turning it over.

Can you not try this with perhaps a large chicken for your first run?

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 03:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 51,127
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 17:14:35 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann
wrote:

On Nov 12, 4:11*pm, "Kent" wrote:


The turkey is roasted oppositely from my usual way. The turkey goes into the
oven at 325F breast side down until the breast reaches 130F. Then the oven
temp. is raised to 450F; the turkey turned to breast side up and is finished
off to a thigh temp. of 175F.



I'm going to roast a rehearsal turkey tomorrow and I'm going to try this.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Kent


I've seen this before, not the ATK version, of roasting a turkey
breast down and then flipping to brown. I just don't know if I'd want
to wrestle with a hot turkey turning it over.

Can you not try this with perhaps a large chicken for your first run?


I would be so over-dosed on turkey that it wouldn't be funny if I
cooked a "trial" turkey too.

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 03:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,501
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Nov 12, 7:53*pm, Sqwertz wrote:
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 17:14:35 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:
I've seen this before, not the ATK version, of roasting a turkey
breast down and then flipping to brown. *I just don't know if I'd want
to wrestle with a hot turkey turning it over.


Can you not try this with perhaps a large chicken for your first run?


Every year, like clockwork, I launch into a crusade explaining the
virtues of roasting turkeys breast side down for the bestest most
moistest turkey ever.

And each year, like clockwork, I get a bunch of sadass excuses like,.
"It's too hard to flip" (who said anything about flipping?), *"It
looks ugly", "I just don't want to do it", "whine, moan, bith,
cry...".

So this year I'm going to make that half-hearted rant. *But in 10
years, when everybody is roasting their turkeys breast side down, I
WILL be back. *And you know what I'm going to say? *The same hting I
did when everybody told me I was crazy for killfiling Google groups.

This does no mean I won't be back in a couple weeks for my annual
"Friends don't give friends Fruitcake" rant.

-sw




Ok, ok. Don't get your nesting box straw all torn up. I've not done
it and it does sound a bit 'dangerous.' I'm eager, truly, to read how
you get the bird on it's back without suffering a burn or the hair
raising possibility of it ending up on the kitchen floor. So please
explain as I *would* like to know.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 04:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,323
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 18:59:39 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann
wrote:




Every year, like clockwork, I launch into a crusade explaining the
virtues of roasting turkeys breast side down for the bestest most
moistest turkey ever.




-sw




Ok, ok. Don't get your nesting box straw all torn up. I've not done
it and it does sound a bit 'dangerous.' I'm eager, truly, to read how
you get the bird on it's back without suffering a burn or the hair
raising possibility of it ending up on the kitchen floor. So please
explain as I *would* like to know.


First step it to get a pair of heat resistant rubber gloves like these
http://www.amazon.com/Steven-Raichle...155382&sr=1-22

http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Bar-B-Q-Ins...155605&sr=1-28

When ready to do the flip, you can either take the roasting pan out of
the oven or you can pull the oven rack out far enough to slide the pan
out into the open. Then just grab the bird at each end and give it a
quarter turn. Put it down and give it another quarter turn.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 04:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 954
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen


"ItsJoanNotJoann" wrote in message
...
On Nov 12, 7:53 pm, Sqwertz wrote:
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 17:14:35 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:
I've seen this before, not the ATK version, of roasting a turkey
breast down and then flipping to brown. I just don't know if I'd want
to wrestle with a hot turkey turning it over.


Can you not try this with perhaps a large chicken for your first run?


Every year, like clockwork, I launch into a crusade explaining the
virtues of roasting turkeys breast side down for the bestest most
moistest turkey ever.

And each year, like clockwork, I get a bunch of sadass excuses like,.
"It's too hard to flip" (who said anything about flipping?), "It
looks ugly", "I just don't want to do it", "whine, moan, bith,
cry...".

So this year I'm going to make that half-hearted rant. But in 10
years, when everybody is roasting their turkeys breast side down, I
WILL be back. And you know what I'm going to say? The same hting I
did when everybody told me I was crazy for killfiling Google groups.

This does no mean I won't be back in a couple weeks for my annual
"Friends don't give friends Fruitcake" rant.

-sw




Ok, ok. Don't get your nesting box straw all torn up. I've not done
it and it does sound a bit 'dangerous.' I'm eager, truly, to read how
you get the bird on it's back without suffering a burn or the hair
raising possibility of it ending up on the kitchen floor. So please
explain as I *would* like to know.


I've done this mucho tiempos on the grill, though not in the home oven for a
long time. On the large kettle grill, baking indirectly, with drip pan
underneath, and with coals on both sides, I use a non stick rack to hold the
turkey, one with a fairly wide angle.

I start with breast side down for 30+ minutes, and then rotate with tongs 90
degrees to either side. I leave it on side #1 for 15-20 min. and then rotate
90 degrees to breast side up for 20 min. Then I finish off with the other
side until the proper thigh temp. is reached.

I think the most important thing on the grill is to roast with a non stuffed
bird, and to stick around 12lb.

Kent



  #8 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 05:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 51,127
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 18:59:39 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann
wrote:

Ok, ok. Don't get your nesting box straw all torn up. I've not done
it and it does sound a bit 'dangerous.' I'm eager, truly, to read how
you get the bird on it's back without suffering a burn or the hair
raising possibility of it ending up on the kitchen floor.


And with no dents on the breast that match the rack wires.

So please explain as I *would* like to know.


I've done cooked a turkey breast down. Flipping it wasn't a big deal,
but I thought the result was ugly and didn't do that again.

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 05:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 51,127
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 19:44:46 -0800, "Kent"
wrote:

I've done this mucho tiempos on the grill, though not in the home oven for a
long time. On the large kettle grill, baking indirectly, with drip pan
underneath, and with coals on both sides, I use a non stick rack to hold the
turkey, one with a fairly wide angle.

I start with breast side down for 30+ minutes, and then rotate with tongs 90
degrees to either side. I leave it on side #1 for 15-20 min. and then rotate
90 degrees to breast side up for 20 min. Then I finish off with the other
side until the proper thigh temp. is reached.

I think the most important thing on the grill is to roast with a non stuffed
bird, and to stick around 12lb.


There's no need to turn a turkey you're cooking on the Weber via the
indirect method. It gets crispy and brown all over, with minimal
effort on your part.

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 05:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
isw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 754
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

In article
,
ItsJoanNotJoann wrote:

On Nov 12, 4:11*pm, "Kent" wrote:


The turkey is roasted oppositely from my usual way. The turkey goes into the
oven at 325F breast side down until the breast reaches 130F. Then the oven
temp. is raised to 450F; the turkey turned to breast side up and is finished
off to a thigh temp. of 175F.



I'm going to roast a rehearsal turkey tomorrow and I'm going to try this.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Kent


I've seen this before, not the ATK version, of roasting a turkey
breast down and then flipping to brown. I just don't know if I'd want
to wrestle with a hot turkey turning it over.


Been doing it that way for years. Works very well, and seems to keep the
breast from drying out so much. Just grab the bird at each end, with a
towel or a wad of paper towels in each hand. Or do what I do, and stick
a big carving fork in the neck hole and another in the, um, other hole,
and just roll it over.

Isaac
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 05:57 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,501
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Nov 12, 9:44*pm, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 18:59:39 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann





wrote:

Every year, like clockwork, I launch into a crusade explaining the
virtues of roasting turkeys breast side down for the bestest most
moistest turkey ever.


-sw


Ok, ok. *Don't get your nesting box straw all torn up. *I've not done
it and it does sound a bit 'dangerous.' *I'm eager, truly, to read how
you get the bird on it's back without suffering a burn or the hair
raising possibility of it ending up on the kitchen floor. *So please
explain as I *would* like to know.


First step it to get a pair of heat resistant rubber gloves like thesehttp://www.amazon.com/Steven-Raichlen-Best-Barbecue-Insulated/dp/B000...

http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Bar-B-Q-Ins...ves/dp/B000XAL...

When ready to do the flip, you can either take the roasting pan out of
the oven or you can pull the oven rack out far enough to slide the pan
out into the open. *Then just grab the bird at each end and give it a
quarter turn. *Put it down and give it another quarter turn.




Thank you! This was what I was wanting to see, some actual
instructions of how this was done.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 05:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
isw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 754
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

In article ,
sf wrote:

On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 18:59:39 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann
wrote:

Ok, ok. Don't get your nesting box straw all torn up. I've not done
it and it does sound a bit 'dangerous.' I'm eager, truly, to read how
you get the bird on it's back without suffering a burn or the hair
raising possibility of it ending up on the kitchen floor.


And with no dents on the breast that match the rack wires.

So please explain as I *would* like to know.


I've done cooked a turkey breast down. Flipping it wasn't a big deal,
but I thought the result was ugly and didn't do that again.


Depends on what's most important -- taste or "looks".

Isaac
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 05:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,501
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

On Nov 12, 10:24*pm, sf wrote:
On Sat, 12 Nov 2011 19:44:46 -0800, "Kent"
wrote:

I've done this mucho tiempos on the grill, though not in the home oven for a
long time. On the large kettle grill, baking indirectly, with drip pan
underneath, and with coals on both sides, I use a non stick rack to hold the
turkey, one with a fairly wide angle.


I start with breast side down for 30+ minutes, and then rotate with tongs 90
degrees to either side. I leave it on side #1 for 15-20 min. and then rotate
90 degrees to breast side up for 20 min. Then I finish off with the other
side until the proper thigh temp. is reached.


I think the most important thing on the grill is to roast with a non stuffed
bird, and to stick around 12lb.


There's no need to turn a turkey you're cooking on the Weber via the
indirect method. *It gets crispy and brown all over, with minimal
effort on your part.


I would think doing a turkey on the Weber there would be no need for
turning either. Like you pointed out, with the indirect heat method
there would lovely browning all over.

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 06:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
isw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 754
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

In article , Gary wrote:

Kent wrote:

I haven't baked a turkey with the stuffing in the bird for more than twenty
years.


I'm so sorry to hear that.
Hopefully you will do it this year and enjoy your stuffing even more.

I always say as a joke....take the turkey out of the oven, scoop out the
stuffing, then toss the turkey in the trash.


That's certainly the best thing to do with the turkey if you've roasted
it until the center of the stuffing is 165 F, as needed for safety.

Isaac
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 13-11-2011, 06:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
isw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 754
Default Turkey on America's Test Kitchen

In article , "Kent"
wrote:

This America's Test Kitchen episode presents a new way, for me at least, to
brine turkey, sort of a "Dry Brine", on today's America's Test Kitchen on
PBS. Watch it today on TV or on the internet. Here's the link to the recipe.
http://www.americastestkitchen.com/r...hp?docid=20850

You put your fingers under the skin and separate skin from the meat
throughout most of the turkey, all of the breast, and most of the thigh.
Then you rub the meat under the skin with Kosher salt. This is sort of a
"dry brine," as it accomplishes what you're trying to do with the usual
brine. The show's chef created a stuffing in the usual fashion with homemade
croutons, and stuffed it into the salted body cavity on top of cheesecloth,
That makes it easy to remove all the stuffing at the end of the baking.

I haven't baked a turkey with the stuffing in the bird for more than twenty
years. I always make the stuffing on the side with homemade turkey stock.
I'm going to stuff the turkey and see how it goes.

The turkey is roasted oppositely from my usual way. The turkey goes into the
oven at 325F breast side down until the breast reaches 130F. Then the oven
temp. is raised to 450F; the turkey turned to breast side up and is finished
off to a thigh temp. of 175F.

I have some concerns, including the salt pork on the skin, the baking powder
on the skin, and use of chicken stock any where in the dish. I always have
turkey stock on hand. The baking powder on chicken skin was a disaster for
us recently.


Kindly elaborate on those "concerns". I've made chicken wings several
times with baking powder sprinkled on, and the result was very crispy
skin.

Isaac
 




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