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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Semolina Flour



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2004, 02:16 AM
Mark D
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Default Semolina Flour

Hi all, Does anyone know of a "common" store offhand that sells
Semolina Flour?
I've tried Wally-World, and they don't carry it (Doesn't surprise me)
Does Albertsons?

I wish to use it for Breads, and Pizza Dough.
Thanks, Mark

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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2004, 03:05 AM
PENMART01
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Default

Hi all, Does anyone know of a "common" store offhand that sells
Semolina Flour?
I've tried Wally-World, and they don't carry it (Doesn't surprise me)
Does Albertsons?

I wish to use it for Breads, and Pizza Dough.
Thanks, Mark


Generally used for pasta, and gnocchi... I don't think you want semolina for
making breads and pizza. There are some recipes for semolina bread but it
makes for extremely dense breads, definitely not something to use in pizza
dough.... although some use semolina to "lube' their peel, more authentic than
corn meal. Semolina is a durham wheat flour ground fairly coarse and sifted to
remove the fine part. The coarse part is semolina... there exists corn and
rice semolina as well. Depending on where you live most large US stupidmarkets
in large cities will carry semolina... otherwise check at Italian delis/pork
stores.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2004, 03:55 AM
Mark D
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Cindy, Thanks for the reply. Sorry I didn't mention where I'm at,
I'm in Southern New Mexico (A newbie here), so basically I'm living in
the Mecca of horrible restaurants, and no decent import
stores/butchers/etc/etc.
Unfortunately, Wal Mart took over here in this town.

To respond to the other poster who replied to me, Yes, I understand that
Semolina Flour is used largely for making Pastas, Gnocchi, etc., but
have you ever used it for bread? (Or Pizza Dough)

Sicilian styles of bread use this type of flour, and yes, you are right,
it will make a dense bread that you have to have good teeth to eat, but
makes for a very unbelieveably tasty bread.

Try it sometime. You might be very surprised of the quality of this
bread made from this flour.
Mark

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2004, 04:31 AM
Julia Altshuler
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Mark D wrote:

To respond to the other poster who replied to me, Yes, I understand that
Semolina Flour is used largely for making Pastas, Gnocchi, etc., but
have you ever used it for bread? (Or Pizza Dough)

Sicilian styles of bread use this type of flour, and yes, you are right,
it will make a dense bread that you have to have good teeth to eat, but
makes for a very unbelieveably tasty bread.

Try it sometime. You might be very surprised of the quality of this
bread made from this flour.



I haven't baked with Semolina flour myself, but my local Portuguese
bakery makes a semolina bread that I buy regularly and use for my
everyday bread for sandwiches and french toast. It isn't tough on the
teeth at all, just has some texture that most white breads lack. I'm
sure I've seen semolina flour now and then in the supermarket but
couldn't tell you for sure where to find it. Surely even in that mecca
of horrible restaurants there's a pizza joint that makes its own pizza
dough. Have you tried hunting them down and buying the flour straight
from them? You could mail order it too, but the shipping charges would
be outrageous. Flour is heavy. (Please, no wise-ass remarks about iron
and feathers; you know what I mean.)


A funny aside about pizza joints: Y'all know I've been working in a new
classy wine and cheese shop. Around the corner in the same complex of
buildings is a Domino's Pizza. And guess what? The guys there are
great! In addition to their ordinary mass-produced slop, they're
working with us to develop a chevre, sun-dried tomato and prosciutto
pizza that tastes great. I have no idea how this will work
customer-wise, but I'm tickled that the project has gotten this far.


--Lia

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2004, 02:58 PM
Janet Bostwick
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mark D" wrote in message
...
Hi all, Does anyone know of a "common" store offhand that sells
Semolina Flour?
I've tried Wally-World, and they don't carry it (Doesn't surprise me)
Does Albertsons?

I wish to use it for Breads, and Pizza Dough.
Thanks, Mark


Hi Mark,

Try a health food store or food co-op. I'm able to get the fine semolina at
my food co-op in the bulk bin area for my bread making. Do you have a WINCO
grocery in your area? They carry a wide selection of flour, including
semolina in their bulk food area. You may be able to talk Albertsons into
carrying it for you but you will pay a premium for it way over what you
would pay at a health food store. Come on over to alt.bread.recipes and ask
the question, there may be someone there who knows of a source near you as
many of us use it. I am surprised however, that you say that bread dough
made with semolina flour produces a dense and tough bread. Are you using
100 percent semolina to make the dough?
Janet


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 26-10-2004, 02:58 PM
Janet Bostwick
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Mark D" wrote in message
...
Hi all, Does anyone know of a "common" store offhand that sells
Semolina Flour?
I've tried Wally-World, and they don't carry it (Doesn't surprise me)
Does Albertsons?

I wish to use it for Breads, and Pizza Dough.
Thanks, Mark


Hi Mark,

Try a health food store or food co-op. I'm able to get the fine semolina at
my food co-op in the bulk bin area for my bread making. Do you have a WINCO
grocery in your area? They carry a wide selection of flour, including
semolina in their bulk food area. You may be able to talk Albertsons into
carrying it for you but you will pay a premium for it way over what you
would pay at a health food store. Come on over to alt.bread.recipes and ask
the question, there may be someone there who knows of a source near you as
many of us use it. I am surprised however, that you say that bread dough
made with semolina flour produces a dense and tough bread. Are you using
100 percent semolina to make the dough?
Janet


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 12:05 AM
Arri London
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Mark D wrote:

Hi Cindy, Thanks for the reply. Sorry I didn't mention where I'm at,
I'm in Southern New Mexico (A newbie here), so basically I'm living in
the Mecca of horrible restaurants, and no decent import
stores/butchers/etc/etc.
Unfortunately, Wal Mart took over here in this town.


Do you have Wild Oats or Wholefoods down there? Any Asian shops?
Otherwise I can try to get you some from up here (ABQ) and 'export' it
to you for a price LOL.



To respond to the other poster who replied to me, Yes, I understand that
Semolina Flour is used largely for making Pastas, Gnocchi, etc., but
have you ever used it for bread? (Or Pizza Dough)

Sicilian styles of bread use this type of flour, and yes, you are right,
it will make a dense bread that you have to have good teeth to eat, but
makes for a very unbelieveably tasty bread.

Try it sometime. You might be very surprised of the quality of this
bread made from this flour.
Mark

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 12:05 AM
Arri London
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Mark D wrote:

Hi Cindy, Thanks for the reply. Sorry I didn't mention where I'm at,
I'm in Southern New Mexico (A newbie here), so basically I'm living in
the Mecca of horrible restaurants, and no decent import
stores/butchers/etc/etc.
Unfortunately, Wal Mart took over here in this town.


Do you have Wild Oats or Wholefoods down there? Any Asian shops?
Otherwise I can try to get you some from up here (ABQ) and 'export' it
to you for a price LOL.



To respond to the other poster who replied to me, Yes, I understand that
Semolina Flour is used largely for making Pastas, Gnocchi, etc., but
have you ever used it for bread? (Or Pizza Dough)

Sicilian styles of bread use this type of flour, and yes, you are right,
it will make a dense bread that you have to have good teeth to eat, but
makes for a very unbelieveably tasty bread.

Try it sometime. You might be very surprised of the quality of this
bread made from this flour.
Mark

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 12:22 AM
Mark D
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Janet, We do have a health food store in this town (If you wanna
call it a health food store, I don't), Maybe, by slim chance they
"Might" have it. This state of New Mexico I live in has to be the most
horsecrap state in the union as far as food goes. There isn't good
restaurant within 100mi.

What people here call good Parmesan Cheese, is the stuff Kraft sells in
the can. That's all they use, they don't know any better.
If most of them ever ate good food, they wouldn't know it here, I'll
tell you.
Even Mexican food here sucks!

Only Tacos they know how to make here is Ground Beef (Cheap) and Shedded
Beef (Using Brisket, even cheaper!) Everything else like Enchiladas is
just aweful! Tell them about a Steak Taco, Al Pastor Pork Taco, or
Chicken Taco, and they look at you strangely!

Yes, I have generally used in the past pure Semolina Flour for Bread. I
suppose a mixture would be real good too. Thanks again! Mark D.

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 12:22 AM
Mark D
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Janet, We do have a health food store in this town (If you wanna
call it a health food store, I don't), Maybe, by slim chance they
"Might" have it. This state of New Mexico I live in has to be the most
horsecrap state in the union as far as food goes. There isn't good
restaurant within 100mi.

What people here call good Parmesan Cheese, is the stuff Kraft sells in
the can. That's all they use, they don't know any better.
If most of them ever ate good food, they wouldn't know it here, I'll
tell you.
Even Mexican food here sucks!

Only Tacos they know how to make here is Ground Beef (Cheap) and Shedded
Beef (Using Brisket, even cheaper!) Everything else like Enchiladas is
just aweful! Tell them about a Steak Taco, Al Pastor Pork Taco, or
Chicken Taco, and they look at you strangely!

Yes, I have generally used in the past pure Semolina Flour for Bread. I
suppose a mixture would be real good too. Thanks again! Mark D.

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 12:25 AM
Mark D
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Arri, They have a few Whole Foods Stores where I used to live in
Chicago Ill. None here I'm afraid in Alamogordo. Maybe Las Cruces?
Mark

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 12:25 AM
Mark D
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi Arri, They have a few Whole Foods Stores where I used to live in
Chicago Ill. None here I'm afraid in Alamogordo. Maybe Las Cruces?
Mark

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2004, 01:26 AM
Jessica V.
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Mark D wrote:

Hi Janet, We do have a health food store in this town (If you wanna
call it a health food store, I don't), Maybe, by slim chance they
"Might" have it. This state of New Mexico I live in has to be the most
horsecrap state in the union as far as food goes. There isn't good
restaurant within 100mi.

What people here call good Parmesan Cheese, is the stuff Kraft sells in
the can. That's all they use, they don't know any better.
If most of them ever ate good food, they wouldn't know it here, I'll
tell you.
Even Mexican food here sucks!

Only Tacos they know how to make here is Ground Beef (Cheap) and Shedded
Beef (Using Brisket, even cheaper!) Everything else like Enchiladas is
just aweful! Tell them about a Steak Taco, Al Pastor Pork Taco, or
Chicken Taco, and they look at you strangely!

Yes, I have generally used in the past pure Semolina Flour for Bread. I
suppose a mixture would be real good too. Thanks again! Mark D.


Sounds like the part of Maine where my parent's have a three season
home. The supermarket has the best selection of hot sauces I've seen
anywhere five or six shelves easily 20 feet long. However, the produce
section is scary there is a section labeled "exotic" it holds button
mushrooms, scallions, romaine, jalepenos, sweet potatoes and I can't
remember what else, but all things I think of as regular produce. I
recall laughing the first time I attempted to shop there.

If you absolutely had to I guess you could order it from King Arthur or
another place like that. Is there an Albertson's around, they'd at
least get it for you if they don't carry it.

Jessica
 




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