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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Left the eggs in the car



 
 
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 12:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,897
Default Left the eggs in the car

barbie gee wrote:

On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Mark Thorson wrote:

Nancy Young wrote:

The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.


I'm willing to bet his life on it that
they are safe to eat.


exactly. we (humans, inside us) are always at 98.6 plus/minus a tad, and
as someone else mentioned, it's 108 deg. F under a chicken.


Actually, I'm pretty much willing to bet someone else's
life on darn near anything. Live life close to the edge,
that's what I say, as long as it's not your own.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 12:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,653
Default Left the eggs in the car

Mark Thorson wrote:
Nancy Young wrote:

The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.


I'm willing to bet his life on it that
they are safe to eat.


(laugh) Yeah, so long as it's not your life.

Personally, I'd toss the eggs out, I'm not big on taking
bad food chances. Just that one case of food poisoning did
it for me.

nancy
  #33 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 02:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,042
Default Left the eggs in the car

J. Clarke wrote:

Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people
are.


So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
dangerous to an adult human? Try again.

(a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.

(b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial growth--a
reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to bacterial growth.

(c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the
egg.

(d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella leaves
no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a pretty
good dose of the live bacteria.

(e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's read
over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.

Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you need
to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying any eggs
that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.


None of those points actually challenged what I wrote. I didn't say anything
about the health of a chicken embryo. I didn't say anything about methods of
killing the salmonella bacterium. I didn't say anything about the prevalence
of salmonella in the chicken population.

The CHICKEN WHICH LAID THE SALMONELLA-INFECTED EGG was obviously infected
with salmonella. Chickens (along with turtles, iguanas, and doubtless
numerous other species) routinely carry around salmonella with no apparent
ill effects. That's what I wrote, and what you failed to address. Try again.

Bob



  #34 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 11:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,057
Default Left the eggs in the car

On 8/1/2010 5:27 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
barbie gee wrote:
On Sun, 1 Aug 2010, Nancy Young wrote:

J. Clarke wrote:
On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
wrote

overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are
they safe to eat?

If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.

But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting
at normal egg temperature?

I don't know the answer to the OP's question, but the eggs weren't
at room temperature, they were in a hot car. FWIW.


it was only overnight, and if the eggs weren't in any way broken, I'm
still not convinced this would be an issue. I still want to know,
how HOT was it? Was the car in the shade til the sun set, or what?


The OP said it got to over 90 in the car.


Which is cooler than the inside of a chicken. The yolk has been at
chicken temperature for a day or so before the egg is laid, and if the
egg is going to have salmonella inside it goes in when the yolk is formed.

  #35 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 11:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,057
Default Left the eggs in the car

On 8/1/2010 9:12 PM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
J. Clarke wrote:

Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people
are.


So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
dangerous to an adult human? Try again.

(a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.

(b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial growth--a
reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to bacterial growth.

(c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the
egg.

(d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella leaves
no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a pretty
good dose of the live bacteria.

(e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's read
over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.

Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you need
to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying any eggs
that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.


None of those points actually challenged what I wrote. I didn't say anything
about the health of a chicken embryo. I didn't say anything about methods of
killing the salmonella bacterium. I didn't say anything about the prevalence
of salmonella in the chicken population.

The CHICKEN WHICH LAID THE SALMONELLA-INFECTED EGG was obviously infected
with salmonella. Chickens (along with turtles, iguanas, and doubtless
numerous other species) routinely carry around salmonella with no apparent
ill effects. That's what I wrote, and what you failed to address. Try again.


Fine, live your life in terror of food.
  #36 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 11:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,057
Default Left the eggs in the car

On 8/1/2010 4:04 PM, Steve B wrote:
"J. wrote in message
...
On 8/1/2010 8:17 AM, Kswck wrote:
wrote in message
...
overnight... And I'm sure the temperature was pretty warm... Are they
safe
to eat?

thanks
sharkman

--


If you ever had food poisoning, you wouldn't ask the question.


But why would someone get food poisoning from eggs that were sitting at
normal egg temperature?


I HAD A BRAINSTORM! GAWD, I AM SMART!

I Googled "salmonella in raw eggs." I found out two things, which seem to
contradict each other. One is that the occurrence of salmonella is so low
that the average person is exposed to one salmonella contaminated egg every
84 years.

Second, temperatures in a car in the sun are highly conducive to the growth
of salmonella IF IT IS THERE IN THE FIRST PLACE.

Google is your friend. Become an expert on salmonella in raw eggs in an
hour or less. Impress your friends.

I learned that salmonella is not very common among healthy chickens, and the
incidents of salmonella contaminated eggs are not very common.

But for a dollar, why take the chance.

Salmonella poisoning can kill you.


Driving to the store to get more eggs is sixty times more likely to kill
you. Most cases of salmonella don't even result in a doctor visit. For
it to kill you you have to already have somethine else wrong with you.
  #37 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 01:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 30
Default Left the eggs in the car

Just to follow up, I took a chance and tried the eggs and I survived so
fa......arggggggghhhhh...

thanks
sharkman
--


"J. Clarke" wrote in message
...
On 8/1/2010 9:12 PM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
J. Clarke wrote:

Well, chickens are obviously not affected by salmonella the way people
are.

So you're saying that something that is harmless to a chicken embryo is
dangerous to an adult human? Try again.

(a) Most eggs do not contain salmonella. There is one rare strain that
can infect an intact egg, but only if the parent chicken's ovaries are
infected. It is estimated that one in 20,000 eggs are so affected.

(b) Egg white contains several mechanisms that inhibit bacterial
growth--a
reasonably fresh egg, even if infected, is resistant to bacterial
growth.

(c) In any case, cooking an egg will kill all salmonella present in the
egg.

(d) Unlike botulism, which does not affect intact eggs, salmonella
leaves
no residual toxins--salmonella only makes you sick if you get a pretty
good dose of the live bacteria.

(e) If you're really that worried about it, put all your eggs in a 145
degree water bath, stick a thermometer into one of them and when it's
read
over 140 for three minutes you've got pasteurized eggs.

Of course if you have AIDS or some other immune system deficiency you
need
to be more careful--in that case you probably shouldn't be buying any
eggs
that aren't factory-pasteurized to begin with.


None of those points actually challenged what I wrote. I didn't say
anything
about the health of a chicken embryo. I didn't say anything about methods
of
killing the salmonella bacterium. I didn't say anything about the
prevalence
of salmonella in the chicken population.

The CHICKEN WHICH LAID THE SALMONELLA-INFECTED EGG was obviously infected
with salmonella. Chickens (along with turtles, iguanas, and doubtless
numerous other species) routinely carry around salmonella with no
apparent
ill effects. That's what I wrote, and what you failed to address. Try
again.


Fine, live your life in terror of food.


  #38 (permalink)  
Old 02-08-2010, 10:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,516
Default Left the eggs in the car

On 8/2/2010 7:23 AM, sharkman wrote:
Just to follow up, I took a chance and tried the eggs and I survived
so fa......arggggggghhhhh...

thanks
sharkman


It is nice to know you lived, thanks for letting us know that you are
fine.... so far. ;-)

B
 




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