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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2010, 11:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2010, 11:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

DamnAnus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?


Some... you ****ing MOROON!
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2010, 11:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,952
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?


No, you cannot get similar results that way.
That would only make sense if you were adding
gluten to cake flour or (god forbid) potato flour.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 25-04-2010, 11:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

In news:rec.food.cooking, brooklyn1's pussy
posted on Sun, 25 Apr 2010 18:07:44 -0400 the following:

Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I
get similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for
baking bread? How much would one need to add?


Some... you ****ing MOROON!


Who are you? Do you reply to everyone like this?

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,178
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour



Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?

Damaeus



We usually add 1 tbs of powdered gluten to the flour needed to make a
1.5 loaf of bread. That amounts to about 3--3.5 cups of flour. You could
add more and see what the texture turns out to be.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

On Sun, 25 Apr 2010 15:11:26 -0700, Mark Thorson
wrote:

Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?


No, you cannot get similar results that way.
That would only make sense if you were adding
gluten to cake flour or (god forbid) potato flour.



You are incorrect. You can get excellent results adding it to all
purpose.

All purpose flours are generally lower in protein content than bread
flours. Adding a bit of vital wheat gluten to all purpose flour can be
quite beneficial in some bread making. Making this a smart move,
though, depends greatly on the recipe and the texture results one is
seeking. It is wonderful for heavy, whole grain breads if one is
unfamiliar with handling complicated doughs and wants to give a lift
to the texture and rise.

Some bread bakers never use VWG as an additive and insist that a
proper bread flour be used when the recipe calls for it, but unless
one is a frequent bread baker, often AP is the only flour around. VWG
lasts forever in the freezer.

Cake flour is not generally used for breads, and I wouldn't bother
trying to correct its very low protein level with VWG to make bread.
Potato flour is usually added as only part of the flour load in bread,
and recipes are more likely to call for potato, rather than potato
flour.

About one tablespoon per loaf. Note results and adjust as necessary
the next time the recipe is used.

Boron
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 623
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

In news:rec.food.cooking, Arri London posted on Sun, 25
Apr 2010 17:10:40 -0600 the following:

Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I
get similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for
baking bread? How much would one need to add?


We usually add 1 tbs of powdered gluten to the flour needed to make a
1.5 loaf of bread. That amounts to about 3--3.5 cups of flour. You
could add more and see what the texture turns out to be.


A French Bread recipe I'm going to try calls for 3.5 to 4 cups of flour,
so I'll give it a shot. Thanks.

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

On Apr 25, 6:01*pm, Damaeus wrote:
I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. *Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? *How much would one need to add?

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)


I use 1 T. to 1C all purpose flour when I am out of bread flour. Mix
well.
I haven't noticed much difference.

I never priced it out, so I can't say which is cheaper.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 40
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour


"Damaeus" wrote in message
...
I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)


30% all purpose 36% gluten and 34% marijuana should work well for you


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 598
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

On 4/25/2010 12:01 PM, Damaeus wrote:
I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?


I've baked bread using gluten and all-purpose flour. The results were
loaves that were crispy and shiny. It's a pretty neat additive. I think
I used one or two tablespoons for 4 cups of flour. These days I just use
AP flour - my results are still good enough for me.


Damaeus


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:40 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,646
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour


"Damaeus" wrote in message
...
In news:rec.food.cooking, Arri London posted on Sun, 25
Apr 2010 17:10:40 -0600 the following:

Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I
get similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for
baking bread? How much would one need to add?


We usually add 1 tbs of powdered gluten to the flour needed to make a
1.5 loaf of bread. That amounts to about 3--3.5 cups of flour. You
could add more and see what the texture turns out to be.


A French Bread recipe I'm going to try calls for 3.5 to 4 cups of flour,
so I'll give it a shot. Thanks.

Funnily enough, French bread flours are lower in gluten and are closer to AP
than N.American bread flours.
Graham


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,896
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

In article ,
Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I get
similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for baking
bread? How much would one need to add?

Damaeus


Similar to what?

Bread was baked for a very long time by home bakers before anyone ever
heard of bread flour, high protein flour, or any of the myriad types of
flour on the supermarket shelves today.

I bake white bread with all purpose flour. I bake whole wheat bread
with a mixture of whole wheat flour, all purpose flour, and some vital
wheat gluten if I think about including it.


--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.me.com/barbschaller
Updated 4-24-2010 with food story and pictures
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 02:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 623
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

In news:rec.food.cooking, "graham" posted on Sun, 25
Apr 2010 17:40:25 -0600 the following:

Funnily enough, French bread flours are lower in gluten and are closer to AP
than N.American bread flours.


Well, if I can get a loaf of bread to turn out lighter than pound cake,
I'll be happy. I've got pizza crust, pancakes, biscuits and muffins down.
The last frontier is a loaf of bread that tastes as good as it makes the
house smells when it's baking.

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 03:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 598
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

On 4/25/2010 3:59 PM, Damaeus wrote:
In news:rec.food.cooking, posted on Sun, 25
Apr 2010 17:40:25 -0600 the following:

Funnily enough, French bread flours are lower in gluten and are closer to AP
than N.American bread flours.


Well, if I can get a loaf of bread to turn out lighter than pound cake,
I'll be happy. I've got pizza crust, pancakes, biscuits and muffins down.
The last frontier is a loaf of bread that tastes as good as it makes the
house smells when it's baking.


If you're making a French or Italian loaf, the addition of gluten will
help considerably. If you're making an American-style white bread, not
so much - in which case, I'd forget about it.


Damaeus


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 26-04-2010, 03:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 623
Default Adding Gluten to All-Purpose Flour

In news:rec.food.cooking, Melba's Jammin'
posted on Sun, 25 Apr 2010 18:42:53 -0500 the following:

In article ,
Damaeus wrote:

I've got some all-purpose flour and I also have some gluten. Could I
get similar results adding some gluten to the all-purpose flour for
baking bread? How much would one need to add?


Similar to what?


French bread.

Bread was baked for a very long time by home bakers before anyone ever
heard of bread flour, high protein flour, or any of the myriad types of
flour on the supermarket shelves today.


Yeah, that's what I thought...and either their bread was crappy, though
nobody complained because it was better than going hungry...or somehow
they made bread just as good from all-purpose flour and today's bakers
just take the easy way out by baking with special varieties of flour. I've
got no problem with shopping for flour, but I'd rather stick to
all-purpose because I have a huge tub I keep it in that makes it easy to
scoop out what I need without making a mess over even a large canister.

I bake white bread with all purpose flour. I bake whole wheat bread
with a mixture of whole wheat flour, all purpose flour, and some vital
wheat gluten if I think about including it.


I'll be happy with white bread for now. heh

Damaeus
--
"Marijuana inflames the erotic impulses and leads to revolting sex
crimes"
-Daily Mirror (1924)
 




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