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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 05:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 14
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
If so how much should I reduce it?
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 05:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 48,149
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
wrote:

I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
If so how much should I reduce it?


Use it 1:1. No problem.

--
Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 06:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,400
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
If so how much should I reduce it?


What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not
want to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned
as a kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 01:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 14
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 23:25:15 -0700, spamtrap1888 wrote:

On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I normally
use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit. If so
how much should I reduce it?


What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not want
to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned as a
kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.


pots de creme, this version the milk is the only creme/milk product.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 06:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,892
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

In article ,
Handy Gandy wrote:

On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 23:25:15 -0700, spamtrap1888 wrote:

On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I normally
use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit. If so
how much should I reduce it?


What's the recipe about? Is it a very old one? Generally you do not want
to boil milk unless you want to denature the proteins. I learned as a
kid that boiling milk would make the hot chocolate taste nasty.


pots de creme, this version the milk is the only creme/milk product.



I wouldn't boil it to reduce the volume at all. Maybe add a tablespoon
of butter to increase the richness -- increase the fat in your
reduced-fat milk. JAT.

Have a look at this thread on America's Test Kitchen's discussion board"
http://www.americastestkitchentv.com...?postID=193500
--
Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.me.com/barbschaller
Angel Hair Pasta with Mushrooms and Artichokes,
Marcy 22, 2010
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 09:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 530
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
wrote:

I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
If so how much should I reduce it?


Well, math is your friend. If going from 2% to whole milk -- 100% -- you should
obviously reduce it to 1/50th the volume. That would be approximately one
teaspoon.

-- Larry
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 09:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 842
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Mar 23, 5:53�pm, pltrgyst wrote:
On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
wrote:

I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit..
If so how much should I reduce it?


Well, math is your friend. If going from 2% to whole milk -- 100% -- you should
obviously reduce it to 1/50th the volume. �That would be approximately one
teaspoon.

-- Larry



Whole milk is not 100%. The percentage refers to the amount of
butterfat in the milk by weight. If it were 100% you would have
butter. Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 10:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 35
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.


wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I normally
use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit. If so
how much should I reduce it?


I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.

Steve


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 23-03-2010, 10:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,223
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

pltrgyst wrote:
On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 05:09:08 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
wrote:

I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
If so how much should I reduce it?


Well, math is your friend. If going from 2% to whole milk -- 100% -- you should
obviously reduce it to 1/50th the volume. That would be approximately one
teaspoon.


Hee! I love it.

ObActualFood: Mortadella, red onions, and tomatoes on potato bread. Yumma.

Serene
--
"I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2010, 04:47 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 14
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:24:39 -0700, Steve B wrote:

wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I
normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a
bit. If so how much should I reduce it?


I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.

Steve


If you do not boil it how can you be sure the egg is safely cooked?
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2010, 05:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 48,149
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Wed, 24 Mar 2010 04:47:19 +0000 (UTC), Handy Gandy
wrote:

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 15:24:39 -0700, Steve B wrote:

wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk. I
normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a
bit. If so how much should I reduce it?


I'd use 2%, but I would not boil it.

Steve


If you do not boil it how can you be sure the egg is safely cooked?


Eggs only need to reach a minimum 160 F and they don't need to stay
at that temperature for any sustained amount of time.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...wers/index.asp


--
Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2010, 07:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 530
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:58:43 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

Whole milk is not 100%. The percentage refers to the amount of
butterfat in the milk by weight. If it were 100% you would have
butter. Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.


Whooosh!

Oh, AOL. Never mind.

-- Larry
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2010, 01:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,077
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Mar 24, 2:07*am, pltrgyst wrote:
On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 14:58:43 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

Whole milk is not 100%. *The percentage refers to the amount of
butterfat in the milk by weight. *If it were 100% you would have
butter. *Whole milk is only around 3.5% butterfat by weight.


Whooosh!

Oh, AOL. Never mind.


That's what djs... gets for trying to correct an idiot.

-- Larry


--Bryan
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2010, 03:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,258
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Mar 23, 12:09*am, Handy Gandy wrote:
I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.
If so how much should I reduce it?


I never have whole milk in the house; I buy whipping cream in small
amounts if I need it for a recipe that calls for whipped cream.

I use skim milk across the board, and it makes no difference at all in
how the recipe comes out.

N.
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 24-03-2010, 03:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,258
Default Substituting 2% milk for whole milk.

On Mar 23, 1:25*am, spamtrap1888 wrote:
On Mar 22, 10:09*pm, Handy Gandy wrote:

I have a recipe that calls for one cup boipling whole milk.
I normally use 2%, I was wondering if I could use that reducing it a bit.

 




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