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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Unglazed quarry tiles



 
 
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2009, 04:06 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 9,882
Default Unglazed quarry tiles

On Thu, 24 Dec 2009 20:59:29 -0600, Sqwertz
wrote:

On Thu, 24 Dec 2009 13:39:52 -0500, brooklyn1 wrote:

On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 21:17:54 -0700, "Janet Bostwick"
wrote:


"Sqwertz" wrote in message
news On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 15:25:05 -0700, Janet Bostwick wrote:

Tile made of aggregate (pieces) have the potential to explode. Quarry
tiles
are not aggregate.
Maybe this explanation will help you. http://tinyurl.com/ycln2b4

I sure hope Thornson isn't reading this.

-sw
I don't get the reference -- I'm pretty clueless. Who is Thornson?
Janet

That would be Thornson Grain! LOL


Another WHOOSH!

Nope... if you want to be creative it's been Thorazine for ages.
Ads
  #32 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2009, 05:01 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,731
Default Unglazed quarry tiles

Doug Freyburger wrote:
gloria.p wrote:
They aren't that hard to find in the southwest. There's no
guarantee that the clay they are made from is lead-free.


In California there's no Porp 65 requirement to label items not related
to food preparation. Outside California there's no requirement to
include Prop 65 labels on anything.

Tiles for flooring aren't food preparation items. Not that I have any
idea how much lead leaches out of a tile into the crust of a pizza.




If in doubt I'd wrap the tile in heavy duty foil, maybe a couple
of layers.

gloria p
  #33 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2009, 05:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Unglazed quarry tiles

On Thu, 24 Dec 2009 22:01:02 -0700, "gloria.p"
wrote:

Doug Freyburger wrote:
gloria.p wrote:
They aren't that hard to find in the southwest. There's no
guarantee that the clay they are made from is lead-free.


In California there's no Porp 65 requirement to label items not related
to food preparation. Outside California there's no requirement to
include Prop 65 labels on anything.

Tiles for flooring aren't food preparation items. Not that I have any
idea how much lead leaches out of a tile into the crust of a pizza.




If in doubt I'd wrap the tile in heavy duty foil, maybe a couple
of layers.

gloria p


Then what's the point? Tiles/stones don't do anything to improve
baking in a home oven anyway, especially not when placed in a metal
pan... there is no way to turn a home oven (gas or electric) into a
real brick oven. A real brick oven relies on the flames licking the
bricks and with electric the elements are embedded inside the bricks,
nor does a home oven produce anywhere near the BTUs needed for
sufficient recovery rate... about all one accomplishes by placing
stones in their home oven is increase their fuel bill, quite possibly
ruining their oven, and display their ignornace... my GE Profile
stove's owner's manual displays a prominent warning (in red) that use
of pizza stones voids the warranty (home ovens are not designed to
operate at their extreme temperature range with anything that inhibits
convection and/or concentrates heat in any particular areas, this can
warp sheet metal and damage thermostats and other components).
Nowadays even commercial bakeries use perforated bakeware, they
realize that it produces far better results and with significantly
lower energy consumption.... the greater the air circulation,
especially at the bottom of breads, the better the results and at
lower temperatures... past a point higher baking temperature causes
top burning before the product is baked through... oven temperatures
above 450F burns pizza toppings and can easily damage home oven sheet
metal because the large area of a pizza stone impedes normal
convection. Most every pizzeria today uses pizza screens. Anyone who
owns a convection oven should definitely be using a pizza screen and
perforated bakeware for all breads. Use of pizza stones with
convection ovens is indicative of gross stupidity so severe that
smarter then a 5th grader would be no achievement, when in fact those
idiots aren't smarter than a 5 year old.

Imagine, folks paying good money for a modern stove and then being
suckered in to buying ancient Aztec cooking rocks. Perhaps solar
baking ain't far off, but in the future it won't need to be done
outdoors in a scorching desert clime.


  #34 (permalink)  
Old 25-12-2009, 06:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 475
Default Unglazed quarry tiles

On Dec 23, 3:02*pm, Chemo the Clown wrote:
On Dec 23, 12:30*pm, notbob wrote:

Has anyone seen this legendary mythical creature?


I've been searching high and low. *More specifically, Lowe's, which
countless baking web-sites swear is the world-wide purveyor of dirt
cheap red unglazed quarry tiles. *NOT! *Called 3 Lowe's and been told
...."...no, but we can order them". *Likewise Home depot and half
dozen lame small businesses. *I can only suspect the "line my oven for
under $5" is a blantant outright lie perpetrated by snarky bread geek
wannabe's wishing to impress clueless sourdough wannebe's like myself.


nb *


There's very little demand for unglazed tiles. Oh...take an anger
management class...it'll help.


They are mostly for commercial applications. I remember replacing
some in the production area of a donut shop almost 30 years ago, and
they were in every kitchen in the stores I used to run cleaning crews
in. The advantage of them is that they hold up to caustic industrial
degreasers.

--Bryan
  #35 (permalink)  
Old 03-02-2010, 08:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 996
Default Unglazed quarry tiles

On Thu, 24 Dec 2009 08:46:48 -0800 in rec.food.cooking, David Harmon
wrote,
On Wed, 23 Dec 2009 18:55:54 -0800 (PST) in rec.food.cooking, Manda Ruby
wrote,
On Dec 23, 1:23*pm, David Harmon wrote:
I got mine at Home Depot. *12" square and 1/2 thick.
A dollar and change. *Stock item, not some special.


Would you be able to provide me with the item number?


After my next trip to Home Depot, whenever that happens.



It's called a Saltillo paver. 12 x 12 inches. $1.19
The Home Depot item number is 187-565.
http://i49.tinypic.com/r77w5y.jpg

The one I bought for a pizza stone is nice and flat. When I went
back yesterday, every one they had in stock had some kind of animal
tracks in the surface. Not just one kind, either, but quite a
variety of tracks.

 




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