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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Cooking with a blowtorch



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 05:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,480
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

Steve B wrote:
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? Would you use propane or MAPP?

Steve




Use propane. MAPP is more expensive and might have a taste. (I use
an electric heat gun in the kitchen sometimes to brown things. Have
used a propane torch before to roast peppers)

Bob
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 05:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 433
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

On Dec 17, 11:33*am, zxcvbob wrote:
Steve B wrote:
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. *I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. * I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. *Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? *Would you use propane or MAPP?


Steve


Use propane. *MAPP is more expensive and might have a taste. *(I use
an electric heat gun in the kitchen sometimes to brown things. *Have
used a propane torch before to roast peppers)

Bob


Just watch for exhaust gas buildup in the house. Carbon Monoxide and
all its friends.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 06:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 22
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

On Dec 17, 9:33*am, zxcvbob wrote:
Steve B wrote:
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. *I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. * I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. *Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? *Would you use propane or MAPP?


Steve


Use propane. *MAPP is more expensive and might have a taste. *(I use
an electric heat gun in the kitchen sometimes to brown things. *Have
used a propane torch before to roast peppers)


I use propane torch too, the biggest one that Home Depot sells. Great
for imparting "grilled"/"seared"outside texture/flavour to fish,
meat, desserts, etc.

I got it after I saw Heston Blumenthal swear by it in "Kitchen
Chemistry" as a finishing searing touch to his low temperature, ultra–
slow cooking.

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 06:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 297
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? Would you use propane or MAPP?

Steve


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 06:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,847
Default Cooking with a blowtorch


zxcvbob wrote:

Steve B wrote:
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? Would you use propane or MAPP?

Steve



Use propane. MAPP is more expensive and might have a taste. (I use
an electric heat gun in the kitchen sometimes to brown things. Have
used a propane torch before to roast peppers)

Bob


MAPP is more expensive, however it is also hotter. It has no taste. I
use MAPP with my Bernz-o-Matic TS4000 for bruleeing my creme brulees and
many other kitchen tasks.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 06:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,400
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

Steve B wrote:

I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods?


When doing caramelization the flame definitely alters the flavor of the
sugar. Try comparing powdered sugar to caramel candy side by side to
get a closer experience of the effect.

Would you use propane or MAPP?


I would use the type of gas the torch was made for because these are
explosive gases and it's dangerous to use them incorrectly. You wrote
that you have a "propane" torch. The terminology is specific and
important and not to be taken as a generic meaning. Use propane for a
propane torch, MAPP gas for a MAPP torch.

Having used both types, the MAPP torches burn hotter. The higher heat
will caramelize the sugar on top of cream brulee' very fast so I think
MAPP torches are better for cream brulee'. Don't be surprized if you
burn one while learning the pace but from there on you'll be making your
cream brulee' with a perfectly browned crispy shell.

Because marshmallows are lighter the less intense flame of a propane
torch might work better. The right tool for the job.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 07:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,752
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

Doug wrote on Thu, 17 Dec 2009 18:45:47 +0000 (UTC):

Steve B wrote:

I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant
cooking to toast marshmallow toppings, and other things. I
have seen them used to make foods more appealing during
photography sessions. I have one of these, and I have
propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches
impart any taste to the foods?


When doing caramelization the flame definitely alters the
flavor of the sugar. Try comparing powdered sugar to caramel
candy side by side to get a closer experience of the effect.


Would you use propane or MAPP?


I would use the type of gas the torch was made for because
these are explosive gases and it's dangerous to use them
incorrectly. You wrote that you have a "propane" torch. The
terminology is specific and important and not to be taken as a
generic meaning. Use propane for a propane torch, MAPP gas
for a MAPP torch.


Having used both types, the MAPP torches burn hotter. The
higher heat will caramelize the sugar on top of cream brulee'
very fast so I think MAPP torches are better for cream
brulee'. Don't be surprized if you burn one while learning
the pace but from there on you'll be making your cream brulee'
with a perfectly browned crispy shell.


I use my workshop blowtorch to char the skins of peppers and eggplants
and achieve a smoky flavor after cooking under the broiler. I do the
charring outdoors, usually on the front doorstep, it only takes a few
seconds :-)

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 08:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 449
Default Cooking with a blowtorch



"Steve B" wrote in message
...
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make
foods more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these,
and I have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart
any taste to the foods? Would you use propane or MAPP?

Steve

I picked up a small version that resembles one of those long BBQ lighters,
except that the flame is a pretty strong jet. I've only used it to sear fish
and crisp stuff when I was in too much of a hurry to wait for the broiler to
do it. It's one of those 'fun' kitchen tools.

Jon

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 09:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,400
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

James Silverton wrote:
Doug wrote:

Having used both types, the MAPP torches burn hotter ...


I use my workshop blowtorch to char the skins of peppers


For peppers burning hotter and faster isn't a good idea. A propane
torch would work better on them.

and eggplants


I haven't flamed eggplants before. Thanx for the suggestion.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 09:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,218
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

Steve B wrote:
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? Would you use propane or MAPP?


I just use a regular propane torch. I did a quick web search and the
cheapest kitchen torch was $20. Some are a lot more. You can get a basic
propane torch for less and it you is in the work shop too. Propane
cylinders are cheap and easy to find.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 17-12-2009, 10:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,752
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

Doug wrote on Thu, 17 Dec 2009 21:08:42 +0000 (UTC):

James Silverton wrote:
Doug wrote:

Having used both types, the MAPP torches burn hotter ...


I use my workshop blowtorch to char the skins of peppers


For peppers burning hotter and faster isn't a good idea. A
propane torch would work better on them.


and eggplants


I haven't flamed eggplants before. Thanx for the suggestion.



Roasted Eggplant with Tomato and Onion

(Baingan Bhartha) is good.

There is also
Roasted Eggplant Salad with Capers and Onions

Italians call this caponata.:



Recipes or URLs can be provided on request.


--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 18-12-2009, 04:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

In article
,
ostap bender wrote:

On Dec 17, 9:33*am, zxcvbob wrote:
Steve B wrote:
I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. *I have seen them used to make
foods
more appealing during photography sessions. * I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. *Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods? *Would you use propane or MAPP?


Steve


Use propane. *MAPP is more expensive and might have a taste. *(I use
an electric heat gun in the kitchen sometimes to brown things. *Have
used a propane torch before to roast peppers)


I use propane torch too, the biggest one that Home Depot sells. Great
for imparting "grilled"/"seared"outside texture/flavour to fish,
meat, desserts, etc.

I got it after I saw Heston Blumenthal swear by it in "Kitchen
Chemistry" as a finishing searing touch to his low temperature, ultra*
slow cooking.


A dedicated kitchen torch is a good thing...
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 18-12-2009, 02:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,074
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

SquawTX wrote:

On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 10:08:14 -0800, Steve B wrote:

I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods?


Not if you use food grain propane.

(Somebody had to do it).

And the dwarf has the noive to rant about my Crystal Palace...
guzzling that _grain_ propane again, eh.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 18-12-2009, 02:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

In article ,
Sqwertz wrote:

On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 10:08:14 -0800, Steve B wrote:

I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make
foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods?


Not if you use food grain propane.

(Somebody had to do it).

-sw


schmack!!!
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 18-12-2009, 02:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Cooking with a blowtorch

In article ,
brooklyn1 wrote:

SquawTX wrote:

On Thu, 17 Dec 2009 10:08:14 -0800, Steve B wrote:

I have seen the small propane torches used in restaurant cooking to toast
marshmallow toppings, and other things. I have seen them used to make
foods
more appealing during photography sessions. I have one of these, and I
have propane and MAPP gases. Does using these small torches impart any
taste to the foods?


Not if you use food grain propane.

(Somebody had to do it).

And the dwarf has the noive to rant about my Crystal Palace...
guzzling that _grain_ propane again, eh.


That was a Thorsonism babe... Did you miss that rather long thread a
couple of years ago? ;-)
--
Peace! Om

"Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
--Steve Rothstein

Web Albums: http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet

Subscribe:

 




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