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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Smoked herring



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 03:08 PM
Luca Pinotti
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Default Smoked herring

maxine in ri wrote:
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of
an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it
have to smell so good???


I love smoked herrings!
I use a simple variation of a russian recipe:
De-salt the herrings keeping them for few hours under milk.
Cut the herrings in pieces.
Add cut onoin into rings.
Add boiled beans, Some olive oil, pepper and serve with brown butterd bread.
A little "snap" of Vodka...

Luca
--
Nolite proicere margaritas ad porcos


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 03:08 PM
Luca Pinotti
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Posts: n/a
Default

maxine in ri wrote:
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of
an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it
have to smell so good???


I love smoked herrings!
I use a simple variation of a russian recipe:
De-salt the herrings keeping them for few hours under milk.
Cut the herrings in pieces.
Add cut onoin into rings.
Add boiled beans, Some olive oil, pepper and serve with brown butterd bread.
A little "snap" of Vodka...

Luca
--
Nolite proicere margaritas ad porcos


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 03:17 PM
Dave Smith
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Posts: n/a
Default

maxine in ri wrote:

It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of
an evening.


I had a bad experience with them too. My wife had bought some as a
special treat for Christmas breakfast. I had been out to a Christmas
party the night before and had had quite a bit of eggnog. My system does
not cope well with a lot of cream (or too much rum) and I assumed that
combination was the cause, but it turned out that I was coming down with
a case of stomach flu. I ended up staying home on Christmas Say while my
wife and son went out for the family Christmas dinner and I spent most
of the day on the throne. Obviously my taste buds were a little off
that day and I would have blamed my condition for the revulsion.
However, my dog would not eat the herring, and this was a dog who used
to eat up the cat's turds before she had a chance to bury them. I have
never been inspired to give it another try.


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 03:17 PM
Dave Smith
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Posts: n/a
Default

maxine in ri wrote:

It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of
an evening.


I had a bad experience with them too. My wife had bought some as a
special treat for Christmas breakfast. I had been out to a Christmas
party the night before and had had quite a bit of eggnog. My system does
not cope well with a lot of cream (or too much rum) and I assumed that
combination was the cause, but it turned out that I was coming down with
a case of stomach flu. I ended up staying home on Christmas Say while my
wife and son went out for the family Christmas dinner and I spent most
of the day on the throne. Obviously my taste buds were a little off
that day and I would have blamed my condition for the revulsion.
However, my dog would not eat the herring, and this was a dog who used
to eat up the cat's turds before she had a chance to bury them. I have
never been inspired to give it another try.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 05:03 PM
Scott
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Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Dave Smith wrote:

I had a bad experience with them too. My wife had bought some as a
special treat for Christmas breakfast. I had been out to a Christmas
party the night before and had had quite a bit of eggnog. My system does
not cope well with a lot of cream (or too much rum) and I assumed that
combination was the cause, but it turned out that I was coming down with
a case of stomach flu. I ended up staying home on Christmas Say while my
wife and son went out for the family Christmas dinner and I spent most
of the day on the throne.


There's really no such thing as stomach flu--influenza is a respiratory
disease. You had gastroenteritis, which can be caused by a host of
organisms: Norwalk gastroenteritis or other viruses, or bacteria such
as E. coli, salmonella, shigella, or Staphylococcus aureus.

There's a good chance you had food poisoning, especially if the eggnog
contained raw eggs, as it often does.

--
to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 05:09 PM
PENMART01
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Posts: n/a
Default

Scott heimdall writes:

Dave Smith wrote:

I had a bad experience with them too. My wife had bought some as a
special treat for Christmas breakfast. I had been out to a Christmas
party the night before and had had quite a bit of eggnog. My system does
not cope well with a lot of cream (or too much rum) and I assumed that
combination was the cause, but it turned out that I was coming down with
a case of stomach flu. I ended up staying home on Christmas Say while my
wife and son went out for the family Christmas dinner and I spent most
of the day on the throne.


There's really no such thing as stomach flu--influenza is a respiratory
disease. You had gastroenteritis, which can be caused by a host of
organisms: Norwalk gastroenteritis or other viruses, or bacteria such
as E. coli, salmonella, shigella, or Staphylococcus aureus.

There's a good chance you had food poisoning, especially if the eggnog
contained raw eggs, as it often does.


Well, certain individuals here do have a proclivity for breathing out their
ass.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 05:20 PM
Jack Schidt®
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"maxine in ri" wrote in message
...
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to pick up at
the market on the way to work. The clerks were setting out the day's
goods, and on top of their cart were several packets of smoked herring.
It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it have to smell
so good???

maxine in ri,


Was it dried too? If so, you need to soak it in water overnight, much like
bacalao.

Jack Fishy


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 05:30 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jack Schidt®" wrote:

"maxine in ri" wrote:
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to pick up at
the market on the way to work. The clerks were setting out the day's
goods, and on top of their cart were several packets of smoked herring.
It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it have to smell
so good???


Was it dried too? If so, you need to soak it in water overnight, much like
bacalao.

Jack Fishy


Probably similar to salt packed anchovy, not really dried like salt cod, but
needs soaking with numerous changes of water. But there are so many different
ways of preparing smoked-salted herring/fish it's impossible to know what the
OP has without more detailed info.

---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 05:30 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jack Schidt®" wrote:

"maxine in ri" wrote:
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to pick up at
the market on the way to work. The clerks were setting out the day's
goods, and on top of their cart were several packets of smoked herring.
It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it have to smell
so good???


Was it dried too? If so, you need to soak it in water overnight, much like
bacalao.

Jack Fishy


Probably similar to salt packed anchovy, not really dried like salt cod, but
needs soaking with numerous changes of water. But there are so many different
ways of preparing smoked-salted herring/fish it's impossible to know what the
OP has without more detailed info.

---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 06:50 PM
Doug Freyburger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

maxine in ri wrote:

It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.


Salty fish is an acquired taste to be sure.

What can I do with it?


Slice thin, put on top of a pizza, or send it to me.

How can I desalinate it?


Rinse it and/or soak it.

Why did it have to smell so good?


Fatty fish have essential fatty acids that are needed for life.
The same category of fatty acids come in nuts and assorted veggies
as well.

I think our ancestors lived on the shoreline long enough to evolve
a taste for fish. Have you noticed that fatty fish smell better
even though they have a much stronger taste? Once you acquire
the taste for the stronger fish the better smell correlates with,
here it comes, better nutritional content.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 08:02 PM
limey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"maxine in ri" wrote in message
...
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of
an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it
have to smell so good???

maxine in ri,


Kippers (smoked herring) were/are pretty popular in England (for breakfast,
Maxine!). Because of their strong, salty flavor the only way I've known
them to be cooked is poached.

Dora



  #12 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 08:02 PM
limey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"maxine in ri" wrote in message
...
It was early in the morning, and I had a couple of things to
pick up at the market on the way to work. The clerks were
setting out the day's goods, and on top of their cart were
several packets of smoked herring. It smelled soo good.!

Got it home, and tried a piece. Bleh! Like eating a handful
of fishy salt.

So this is not something to nibble with crackers and cheese of
an evening.

What can I do with it? How can I desalinate it? Why did it
have to smell so good???

maxine in ri,


Kippers (smoked herring) were/are pretty popular in England (for breakfast,
Maxine!). Because of their strong, salty flavor the only way I've known
them to be cooked is poached.

Dora



  #13 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 08:43 PM
limey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"limey" wrote in message
Kippers (smoked herring) were/are pretty popular in England (for

breakfast,
Maxine!). Because of their strong, salty flavor the only way I've known
them to be cooked is poached.


Dora (see new note)

Here's a British recipe you might like to try.
I've not tried it, but it's certainly easy.

* Exported from MasterCook *

Jugged Kippers

4 Kippers
1 pint Boiling water
1 ounce Butter -- softened
1 tbsp. Fresh parsley -- chopped

Remove the head and tail from each kipper.
Pack the kippers into a tall warmed jug.
Pour the boiling water over the kippers and put a plate on top to seal in
the heat.

After 6 or 7 minutes, drain the kippers on some absorbent kitchen paper and
serve on hot plates. Brush with butter and serve at once sprinkled with
parsley.

Source:
"Helen's Internet Book of British Cooking"


Dora



  #14 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 08:43 PM
limey
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"limey" wrote in message
Kippers (smoked herring) were/are pretty popular in England (for

breakfast,
Maxine!). Because of their strong, salty flavor the only way I've known
them to be cooked is poached.


Dora (see new note)

Here's a British recipe you might like to try.
I've not tried it, but it's certainly easy.

* Exported from MasterCook *

Jugged Kippers

4 Kippers
1 pint Boiling water
1 ounce Butter -- softened
1 tbsp. Fresh parsley -- chopped

Remove the head and tail from each kipper.
Pack the kippers into a tall warmed jug.
Pour the boiling water over the kippers and put a plate on top to seal in
the heat.

After 6 or 7 minutes, drain the kippers on some absorbent kitchen paper and
serve on hot plates. Brush with butter and serve at once sprinkled with
parsley.

Source:
"Helen's Internet Book of British Cooking"


Dora



  #15 (permalink)  
Old 15-10-2004, 08:44 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Kippers (smoked herring) were/are pretty popular in England (for breakfast,
Maxine!). Because of their strong, salty flavor the only way I've known
them to be cooked is poached.

Dora


There are many methods/recipes for kippering, which means to salt and smoke a
dressed fish, usually herring, but can also be black cod, etal. There are
many, many brands of tinned/canned kippers as well, which I don't find so
particularly salty that I can't enjoy them as is. The problem with this
discussion is that it's not possible to ascertain by long distance each
individual's tolerance for saltiness. I enjoy salted smoked herring as is,
without soaking.... and the thing is that salted smoked herring is an
appetizer/condiment, like lox/anchovy/matjes, not meant to be something one
makes their entire meal... although some can, I can.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
 




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