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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Skinning raw peanuts



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-10-2004, 09:09 PM
Peter Aitken
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Default Skinning raw peanuts

I have raw shelled peanuts with the red skins still on them. Any ideas how
to get the skins off easily?

--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-10-2004, 09:49 PM
CJB
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Posts: n/a
Default

previously in rfc, "Peter Aitken" wrote:

I have raw shelled peanuts with the red skins still on them. Any ideas
how to get the skins off easily?


I just rub the peanuts with my fingers if I want to remove them (they
usually come off no problem), but these days I more often than not keep the
red skins on for the antioxidant benefits. If I'm going to crush them for
a topping, etc, the skins kind of blend in anyway and no one is the wiser!


-Claudia
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 01:03 AM
Mark Thorson
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Posts: n/a
Default

CJB wrote:

I just rub the peanuts with my fingers if I want to remove them
(they usually come off no problem), but these days I more often
than not keep the red skins on for the antioxidant benefits.


Benefits? I avoid peanuts for health reasons.

In this study, 10 out of 36 participants were found to be
positive for the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, which
causes the cells of their rectum to divide rapidly (possible
risk factor for colorectal cancer) when they eat peanuts.

Gastroenterology 1998 Jan;114(1):44-9
Peanut ingestion increases rectal proliferation in individuals
with mucosal expression of peanut lectin receptor.
Ryder SD, Jacyna MR, Levi AJ, Rizzi PM, Rhodes JM.
Department of Gastroenterology, Northwick Park Hospital,
Middlesex, England.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The Thomsen-Friedenreich
blood group antigen (galactose beta 1,3-N-acetyl
galactosamine alpha-) acts as an oncofetal antigen
in the colonic epithelium, with low expression in
normal adult epithelia but increasing to fetal levels
of expression in hyperplasia or malignancy. Peanut
lectin is one of the commonest dietary lectins that
binds this antigen. The aim of this study was to
determine whether peanut ingestion can alter rectal
epithelial proliferation.

METHODS: Thirty-six patients with normal colonic
mucosa consumed 100 g of peanuts each
day for 5 days. Rectal mitotic index was measured
before and after ingestion, and changes in
proliferation were correlated with immunohistochemical
detection of lectin receptor expression by
colonocytes and fecal lectin activity as measured
by hemagglutination assay.

RESULTS: Peanut ingestion caused a 41% increase
in rectal mucosal proliferation in individuals with
macroscopically normal mucosa who express
TF antigen in their rectal mucosae (10 of 36
patients studied). The proliferative response
correlated with fecal hemagglutinating activity, and
peanut lectin could be shown immunohistochemically
within the rectal mucosa.

CONCLUSIONS: The common expression
of galactose beta 1,3-N-acetyl galactosamine
alpha- by hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelia
may therefore be functionally important because it
allows interaction with mitogenic dietary lectins.
This could be an important mechanism for the
association between diet and colorectal cancer.



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 01:38 AM
CJB
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

previously in rfc, Mark Thorson wrote:

CJB wrote:

I just rub the peanuts with my fingers if I want to remove them
(they usually come off no problem), but these days I more often
than not keep the red skins on for the antioxidant benefits.


Benefits? I avoid peanuts for health reasons.

In this study, 10 out of 36 participants were found to be
positive for the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, which
causes the cells of their rectum to divide rapidly (possible
risk factor for colorectal cancer) when they eat peanuts.


Are you positive for this antigen? Is that why you stay clear? Or is it a
just in case? I found the study (snipped) a little confusing (didn't
understand all the terms/language), but definitely grim for peanut eaters.
Those who are affected, anyway. I wonder if there's an easy way to know or
find out if you'd be affected....

I've been interested in resveratrol, which has been found to have anti-
inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It's found in peanuts, and moreso
in the red skin...along with other red fruits, and red wine...

And then there's the fact that soluble fiber is found in peanuts, which
keeps the digestive system clean...

There have also been studies that show peanuts to aid in heart health,
lowering triglycerides. They've got lots of heart healthy nutrients.

I guess it's about figuring out what your own health needs are and trying
to eat appropriately, taking the risks/benefits into account.

-Claudia


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 05:02 PM
James A. Finley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Peter Aitken" wrote in message
. com...
"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Fri, 08 Oct 2004 20:09:14 GMT in KtC9d.53494$ci3.2850856
@twister.southeast.rr.com, (Peter Aitken) wrote :

I have raw shelled peanuts with the red skins still on them. Any ideas

how
to get the skins off easily?


If they're truly raw, the skins should be white to pale pink. If that's

the
case, then treat them like a fava bean: blanch in boiling water and the
skins will slip off no problem. If, OTOH, you're going to roast them,

you
don't need to do this, as below.

If they're actually roasted, so the skins are red and papery rather than
white/pink and spongy, then it's even easier. Simply squeeze the peanut
between your fingers so that the nut squirts out, leaving the skin

behind.
It's dead simple and fast. A few skins may be a bit more persistent -

you
can rub these off. Take care of the easy cases first and then go back to
rub the few skins that clung tenaciously.
--


The peanuts I bought were labeled "raw" but had red skins, so I am a bit
confused. Anyway I roasted them in the oven, put them in a large glass

jar,
shook violently to loosen the skins, then went outside and blew the loose
skins away. Didn;t get all of them but enough for my purpose.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.



I worked an eight hour shift at a Mormon peanut butter cannery several years
ago (when I was married to a Morman. We roasted, ground and canned an
eighteen wheeler load of peanuts that were grown near Temple, TX. The raw
peanuts had RED skins.

Jim




  #8 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 05:30 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Peter Aitken" writes:

"Alex Rast" wrote:
(Peter Aitken) wrote :

I have raw shelled peanuts with the red skins still on them. Any ideas

how
to get the skins off easily?


If they're truly raw, the skins should be white to pale pink. If that's

the
case, then treat them like a fava bean: blanch in boiling water and the
skins will slip off no problem. If, OTOH, you're going to roast them, you
don't need to do this, as below.

If they're actually roasted, so the skins are red and papery rather than
white/pink and spongy, then it's even easier. Simply squeeze the peanut
between your fingers so that the nut squirts out, leaving the skin behind.
It's dead simple and fast. A few skins may be a bit more persistent - you
can rub these off. Take care of the easy cases first and then go back to
rub the few skins that clung tenaciously.
--


The peanuts I bought were labeled "raw" but had red skins, so I am a bit
confused. Anyway I roasted them in the oven, put them in a large glass jar,
shook violently to loosen the skins, then went outside and blew the loose
skins away. Didn;t get all of them but enough for my purpose.



http://www.aboutpeanuts.com/every.html

Types of Peanuts
Although peanuts come in many varieties, there are four basic market types:
Runner, Virginia, Spanish and Valencia. Each of the peanut types is distinctive
in size, flavor, and nutritional composition.

Runner
Runners have become the dominant type due to the introduction in the early
1970's of a new runner variety, the Florunner, which was responsible for a
spectacular increase in peanut yields. Runners have rapidly gained wide
acceptance because of the attractive, uniform kernel size. Fifty-four percent
of the runners grown are used for peanut butter. Runners are grown mainly in
Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Texas and Oklahoma.

Virginia
Virginias have the largest kernels and account for most of the peanuts roasted
and processed in-the-shell. When shelled, the larger kernels are sold as snack
peanuts. Virginias are grown mainly in southeastern Virginia and northeastern
North Carolina.

Spanish
Spanish-type peanuts have smaller kernels covered with a reddish-brown skin.
They are used predominantly in peanut candies, with significant quantities used
for snack nuts and peanut butter. They have a higher oil content than the other
types of peanuts which is advantageous when crushing for oil. They are
primarily grown in Oklahoma and Texas.

Valencia
Valencias usually have three or more small kernels to a pod and are covered in
a bright-red skin. They are very sweet peanuts and are usually roasted and sold
in-the-shell. They are also excellent for fresh use as boiled peanuts. New
Mexico is the primary producer of Valencia peanuts.

Within each four basic types of peanuts, there are several "varieties" for seed
and production purposes. Each variety contains distinct characteristics which
allows a producer to select the peanut that is best suited for its region and
market.

Peanut Grading, Shelling and Blanching

At the shelling company buying station, peanuts are sampled and graded by the
Federal-State Inspection Service to determine their value. The inspectors
establish the meat content, size of pods, kernel size, moisture content,
damaged kernels and foreign material. The results of the inspection determine
the overall quality and value of each load.

After the peanuts are purchased by the sheller, they are placed in dry storage
for eventual sale to processors and manufacturers. At the shelling plant,
peanuts are taken from storage and cleaned; dirt, rocks, bits of vines and
other debris are removed. If they are to be sold in their shells, the peanuts
may also pass through a machine that cuts off any remaining stems on the
shells. (About 10% of the peanut crop is sold as in-shell peanuts - usually the
Virginia and Valencia types.) To sort for size, the peanuts travel over sizing
screens that permit the smaller pods to fall through.

Peanuts to be shelled are placed in slotted drums containing screens of
different sizes. Rotating peanuts rub against each other until the shells are
opened and the kernels fall out. The kernels are sized on screens that permit
the smaller kernels to fall through. The shelled peanuts are cleaned again to
remove foreign materials. This is done with density separators, electronic
color sorters and by visual inspection to ensure that only the best peanuts
reach the market. The peanut kernels are then sized, graded and bagged for
market.

From the sheller, peanuts are cleaned again and "blanched" before they are used
in most peanut foods. Blanching is simply the removal of the reddish skin
covering the kernels. In whole-nut or split-nut dry blanching, the kernels
travel through warm air for a period of time to loosen the skins. Then the
kernels go through a blanching machine where large rollers rub the surfaces of
the kernels until the skins fall off. These kernels are checked with electronic
color sorters to ensure that blanching is complete.
---


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 06:01 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"James A. Finley" writes:

"Peter Aitken" wrote:
"Alex Rast" wrote

(Peter Aitken) wrote :

I have raw shelled peanuts with the red skins still on them. Any ideas

how
to get the skins off easily?


If they're truly raw, the skins should be white to pale pink. If that's

the
case, then treat them like a fava bean: blanch in boiling water and the
skins will slip off no problem. If, OTOH, you're going to roast them,

you
don't need to do this, as below.

If they're actually roasted, so the skins are red and papery rather than
white/pink and spongy, then it's even easier. Simply squeeze the peanut
between your fingers so that the nut squirts out, leaving the skin

behind.
It's dead simple and fast. A few skins may be a bit more persistent -

you
can rub these off. Take care of the easy cases first and then go back to
rub the few skins that clung tenaciously.
--


The peanuts I bought were labeled "raw" but had red skins, so I am a bit
confused. Anyway I roasted them in the oven, put them in a large glass

jar,
shook violently to loosen the skins, then went outside and blew the loose
skins away. Didn;t get all of them but enough for my purpose.


I worked an eight hour shift at a Mormon peanut butter cannery several years
ago (when I was married to a Morman).


Sheesh, just one?!?!?

We roasted, ground and canned an
eighteen wheeler load of peanuts that were grown near Temple, TX. The raw
peanuts had RED skins.


Those would be Spanish peanuts, those are the type most likely used for peanut
butter, and candy. TX grows mostly Spanish peanuts.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 06:30 PM
Mark Thorson
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

CJB wrote:

Are you positive for this antigen? Is that why you stay clear?
Or is it a just in case? I found the study (snipped) a little
confusing (didn't understand all the terms/language), but
definitely grim for peanut eaters. Those who are affected,
anyway. I wonder if there's an easy way to know or
find out if you'd be affected....


I don't know my TFA status, but it's a common genetic
trait -- more than 1/4 of the subjects in the study had it.
Without knowing your TFA status, I think it would be
a very bad idea to eat peanuts.

Not to mention that peanuts are commonly contaminated
with aflatoxins -- powerful carcinogens. Peanuts are
among the most potent cancer risks in the food supply.
If a batch of peanuts flunks the test, it can be reprocessed
to reduce contamination and retested. Blanching is
commonly used in the reprocessing.



  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2004, 07:54 PM
James A. Finley
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PENMART01" wrote in message
...
"James A. Finley" writes:

"Peter Aitken" wrote:
"Alex Rast" wrote

(Peter Aitken) wrote :

I have raw shelled peanuts with the red skins still on them. Any

ideas
how
to get the skins off easily?


If they're truly raw, the skins should be white to pale pink. If

that's
the
case, then treat them like a fava bean: blanch in boiling water and

the
skins will slip off no problem. If, OTOH, you're going to roast them,

you
don't need to do this, as below.

If they're actually roasted, so the skins are red and papery rather

than
white/pink and spongy, then it's even easier. Simply squeeze the

peanut
between your fingers so that the nut squirts out, leaving the skin

behind.
It's dead simple and fast. A few skins may be a bit more persistent -

you
can rub these off. Take care of the easy cases first and then go back

to
rub the few skins that clung tenaciously.
--

The peanuts I bought were labeled "raw" but had red skins, so I am a

bit
confused. Anyway I roasted them in the oven, put them in a large glass

jar,
shook violently to loosen the skins, then went outside and blew the

loose
skins away. Didn;t get all of them but enough for my purpose.


I worked an eight hour shift at a Mormon peanut butter cannery several

years
ago (when I was married to a Morman).


Sheesh, just one?!?!?

We roasted, ground and canned an
eighteen wheeler load of peanuts that were grown near Temple, TX. The raw
peanuts had RED skins.


Those would be Spanish peanuts, those are the type most likely used for

peanut
butter, and candy. TX grows mostly Spanish peanuts.


---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon


Yes, they were Spanish peanuts. Three or four small ones in each shell.

After we canned our quota of peanut butter we canned the unsalted roasted
peanuts. I sent my Dad a case. He was on a low salt diet so Mom heated the
peanuts with a little oil and added the salt substitute he was using. He
thought that was great because his snacking had been limited to popcorn. Now
there are many low salt snacks-very few back then.

Jim


 




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