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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

toasted cheese??



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-09-2004, 07:49 AM
D. A.'Dutch' Martinich
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Default toasted cheese??

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 12:22 AM
Charles Gifford
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(D. A.'Dutch' Martinich) wrote in
m:

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


I haven't read the novels and don't have the food book, but it's very
likely that "toasted cheese" in that framework is much like Welsh Rarebit.

--
Wayne in Phoenix


Haven't read the novels nor the cook book, but you reply anyway. Fortunately
you are correct! grin

Paraphrased from "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog", Grossman and Thomas: Toast
soft bread or hard tack as available and place in a dish. Top with shredded
or thinly sliced cheese and brown under a salamander. As with early cheese
rabbits, the toast may be soaked with porter (the cheese may be sprinkled
with mustard too).

These books take place just after the turn of the century (19th) and toasted
cheese is very much related to early recipes for cheese rabbits (rarebits).
An early 18th century recipe for London Rabbit would be: Toast a 1/2-inch
slice of country bread on both sides and put it on a heat-proof platter or
dish. Soak the bread with as much porter as it will hold without becoming
too soft. Top with thinly sliced or shredded Cheddar or similar cheese.
Place under a salamander until the cheese is melted and browned. As with the
toasted cheese above, the cheese can be sprinkled with ground mustard seeds.
For a Cambridge Rabbit later in the 18th century, substitute sherry for the
porter and Cheshire for the Cheddar.

Charlie


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 12:22 AM
Charles Gifford
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(D. A.'Dutch' Martinich) wrote in
m:

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


I haven't read the novels and don't have the food book, but it's very
likely that "toasted cheese" in that framework is much like Welsh Rarebit.

--
Wayne in Phoenix


Haven't read the novels nor the cook book, but you reply anyway. Fortunately
you are correct! grin

Paraphrased from "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog", Grossman and Thomas: Toast
soft bread or hard tack as available and place in a dish. Top with shredded
or thinly sliced cheese and brown under a salamander. As with early cheese
rabbits, the toast may be soaked with porter (the cheese may be sprinkled
with mustard too).

These books take place just after the turn of the century (19th) and toasted
cheese is very much related to early recipes for cheese rabbits (rarebits).
An early 18th century recipe for London Rabbit would be: Toast a 1/2-inch
slice of country bread on both sides and put it on a heat-proof platter or
dish. Soak the bread with as much porter as it will hold without becoming
too soft. Top with thinly sliced or shredded Cheddar or similar cheese.
Place under a salamander until the cheese is melted and browned. As with the
toasted cheese above, the cheese can be sprinkled with ground mustard seeds.
For a Cambridge Rabbit later in the 18th century, substitute sherry for the
porter and Cheshire for the Cheddar.

Charlie


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 12:28 AM
Charles Gifford
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"D. A.'Dutch' Martinich" wrote in message
m...
In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


I have answered under Wayne's post. I'm not one of Her Majesty's subjects,
but do know how it is prepared. If you watch the film Killick prepares this
dish in a silver "toasted cheese" dish. Fortunately you do not need a
specialized dish as they are not easy to find these days! I do urge you to
purchase the cookbook "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog" by Anne Chotzinoff
Grossman and Lisa Grossman Thomas. It is extremely valuable to all who are
interested in the O'Brian books. Amazon has it and the price is reasonable.

Charlie


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 12:28 AM
Charles Gifford
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"D. A.'Dutch' Martinich" wrote in message
m...
In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


I have answered under Wayne's post. I'm not one of Her Majesty's subjects,
but do know how it is prepared. If you watch the film Killick prepares this
dish in a silver "toasted cheese" dish. Fortunately you do not need a
specialized dish as they are not easy to find these days! I do urge you to
purchase the cookbook "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog" by Anne Chotzinoff
Grossman and Lisa Grossman Thomas. It is extremely valuable to all who are
interested in the O'Brian books. Amazon has it and the price is reasonable.

Charlie


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 01:01 AM
Wayne
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Charles Gifford" wrote in
nk.net:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(D. A.'Dutch' Martinich) wrote in
m:

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


I haven't read the novels and don't have the food book, but it's very
likely that "toasted cheese" in that framework is much like Welsh
Rarebit.

--
Wayne in Phoenix


Haven't read the novels nor the cook book, but you reply anyway.
Fortunately you are correct! grin


Hehehe... Well actually, Charlie, I did a little research before I
replied.

I really enjoyed your detail!

Paraphrased from "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog", Grossman and Thomas:
Toast soft bread or hard tack as available and place in a dish. Top
with shredded or thinly sliced cheese and brown under a salamander. As
with early cheese rabbits, the toast may be soaked with porter (the
cheese may be sprinkled with mustard too).

These books take place just after the turn of the century (19th) and
toasted cheese is very much related to early recipes for cheese
rabbits (rarebits). An early 18th century recipe for London Rabbit
would be: Toast a 1/2-inch slice of country bread on both sides and
put it on a heat-proof platter or dish. Soak the bread with as much
porter as it will hold without becoming too soft. Top with thinly
sliced or shredded Cheddar or similar cheese. Place under a salamander
until the cheese is melted and browned. As with the toasted cheese
above, the cheese can be sprinkled with ground mustard seeds. For a
Cambridge Rabbit later in the 18th century, substitute sherry for the
porter and Cheshire for the Cheddar.

Charlie


--
Wayne in Phoenix

unmunge as w-e-b

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 01:01 AM
Wayne
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Charles Gifford" wrote in
nk.net:


"Wayne" wrote in message
...
(D. A.'Dutch' Martinich) wrote in
m:

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


I haven't read the novels and don't have the food book, but it's very
likely that "toasted cheese" in that framework is much like Welsh
Rarebit.

--
Wayne in Phoenix


Haven't read the novels nor the cook book, but you reply anyway.
Fortunately you are correct! grin


Hehehe... Well actually, Charlie, I did a little research before I
replied.

I really enjoyed your detail!

Paraphrased from "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog", Grossman and Thomas:
Toast soft bread or hard tack as available and place in a dish. Top
with shredded or thinly sliced cheese and brown under a salamander. As
with early cheese rabbits, the toast may be soaked with porter (the
cheese may be sprinkled with mustard too).

These books take place just after the turn of the century (19th) and
toasted cheese is very much related to early recipes for cheese
rabbits (rarebits). An early 18th century recipe for London Rabbit
would be: Toast a 1/2-inch slice of country bread on both sides and
put it on a heat-proof platter or dish. Soak the bread with as much
porter as it will hold without becoming too soft. Top with thinly
sliced or shredded Cheddar or similar cheese. Place under a salamander
until the cheese is melted and browned. As with the toasted cheese
above, the cheese can be sprinkled with ground mustard seeds. For a
Cambridge Rabbit later in the 18th century, substitute sherry for the
porter and Cheshire for the Cheddar.

Charlie


--
Wayne in Phoenix

unmunge as w-e-b

*If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it.
*A mind is a terrible thing to lose.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 01:51 AM
Arri London
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



"D. A.'Dutch' Martinich" wrote:

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


The simplest method is to put cheese on toast and run it under the
grill/broiler until it is brown and melted.
Can be seasoned if liked, of course.

Otherwise it is melted in a cheese toaster (of course), mixed with
prepared mustard then browned. Either serve with toast separately or
spread it on the toast and serve that way.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 01:51 AM
Arri London
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



"D. A.'Dutch' Martinich" wrote:

In the Patrick O'Brian Aubry/Maturin novels about the British navy,
toasted cheese is often mentioned as a late evening snack served in
the captain's cabin. Yes, I know there is a food book written as a
spin-off from the series, but I don't have it and neither does my
library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)
Thanks,
D.M.


The simplest method is to put cheese on toast and run it under the
grill/broiler until it is brown and melted.
Can be seasoned if liked, of course.

Otherwise it is melted in a cheese toaster (of course), mixed with
prepared mustard then browned. Either serve with toast separately or
spread it on the toast and serve that way.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 07:37 AM
Christine Dabney
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:22:53 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
wrote:



Haven't read the novels nor the cook book, but you reply anyway. Fortunately
you are correct! grin

Paraphrased from "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog", Grossman and Thomas: Toast
soft bread or hard tack as available and place in a dish. Top with shredded
or thinly sliced cheese and brown under a salamander. As with early cheese
rabbits, the toast may be soaked with porter (the cheese may be sprinkled
with mustard too).



The author of Lobscouse and Spotted Dog, Lisa Grossman is an active
participant and poster on eGullet forums.

Christine


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 07:37 AM
Christine Dabney
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:22:53 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
wrote:



Haven't read the novels nor the cook book, but you reply anyway. Fortunately
you are correct! grin

Paraphrased from "Lobscouse and Spotted Dog", Grossman and Thomas: Toast
soft bread or hard tack as available and place in a dish. Top with shredded
or thinly sliced cheese and brown under a salamander. As with early cheese
rabbits, the toast may be soaked with porter (the cheese may be sprinkled
with mustard too).



The author of Lobscouse and Spotted Dog, Lisa Grossman is an active
participant and poster on eGullet forums.

Christine


  #14 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 09:15 PM
notbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2004-09-15, D. A.'Dutch' Martinich wrote:

library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)


I have the Thomas/Grossman cookbook, but Charlie did such a good job of
paraprasing the book, I need not repeat it. Just to add my own
observaions, toasted cheese is basically what we Americans have come to call
French toast, only without the garlic. Take some bread, put some cheese on
top, and toast it under a hot broiler until the cheese melts and begins to
brown. I'd say a grilled cheese sandwich is a contemporary evolution of
this basic toast and melted cheese dish.

One of the particulars of the books (I'm on the last one! :\ ) is the
Captain's ornate cheese server, "...a remarkably elegant piece of Irish
silver, a covered outer dish that held six within it, the whole kept warm
over a spirit-stove;...". In the movie Master and Commander, this toasted
cheese server is nicely revealed in one of the evening meal scenes. After
months at sea, it often got down to just hardtack crumbs and cheese rinds.
With the addition of a little moisture, these could still be used in the
individual dishes of the server.

BTW, if anyone would like any of the recipes from the Lobscouse & Spotted
Dog cookbook, send me an email and I'll get back. Put "Lobscouse" in the
subject line so I don't inadvertently flag you as spam.

send queries to: a qbg obo ng pbzpnfg qbg arg (rot-13)

nb
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 16-09-2004, 09:15 PM
notbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 2004-09-15, D. A.'Dutch' Martinich wrote:

library. Do any of Her Majesty's subjects out there know how it is
actually prepared? (I would enjoy Manchego just like Killick!)


I have the Thomas/Grossman cookbook, but Charlie did such a good job of
paraprasing the book, I need not repeat it. Just to add my own
observaions, toasted cheese is basically what we Americans have come to call
French toast, only without the garlic. Take some bread, put some cheese on
top, and toast it under a hot broiler until the cheese melts and begins to
brown. I'd say a grilled cheese sandwich is a contemporary evolution of
this basic toast and melted cheese dish.

One of the particulars of the books (I'm on the last one! :\ ) is the
Captain's ornate cheese server, "...a remarkably elegant piece of Irish
silver, a covered outer dish that held six within it, the whole kept warm
over a spirit-stove;...". In the movie Master and Commander, this toasted
cheese server is nicely revealed in one of the evening meal scenes. After
months at sea, it often got down to just hardtack crumbs and cheese rinds.
With the addition of a little moisture, these could still be used in the
individual dishes of the server.

BTW, if anyone would like any of the recipes from the Lobscouse & Spotted
Dog cookbook, send me an email and I'll get back. Put "Lobscouse" in the
subject line so I don't inadvertently flag you as spam.

send queries to: a qbg obo ng pbzpnfg qbg arg (rot-13)

nb
 




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