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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Moose Ribs Recipe



 
 
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  #91 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:05 AM
Glomis
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Default

Steve Calvin wrote:
Nope. Actually as a hunter all of my life I understand. (Can't wait
for the whitetail trip to northern Maine in Nov.!) I absolutely agree
with everything that you said.


I have never hunted or tasted deer meat. There aren't any deer in my area.
In fact that's why there are so many moose. Deer carries a parasite that is
lethal to moose. A population of deer generally severly limits moose
populations.

But, "bottled" meat? Don't think that I've heard of that. What's the
process?


I think in the US you refer to it as 'preserves', although this term may
only apply to vegetable matter. Here in the great white north we bottle
quite a bit of beef, pork and chicken -not to mention wild game- I guess
it's a holdover from the days when winter supplies of meat were limited. It
was a method of preservation. Canning was actually more popular, but the
advent of reusable bottles makes the process more economical.

I typically use 500mL or 1L mason jar preserve bottles. The bottles are
glass, of course and there is a steel ring with a separate steel cap - which
is coated in rubber on the inside. The process is simple but time
consuming. All the bottles must be cleaned and sterilized first.

Normally I keep a full quarter for bottling. This past fall, the moose I
shot had quarters that were about 60Kg (about 135lb if my conversion is
correct). After hanging for about three weeks in 4 Celsius, I brought the
full quarter home and put it on the island in the kitchen (the wife was not
impressed!!). I sliced off all the meat that I could and tossed out the
grisl and other junk and put the bone aside (soup). Then I cut the meat
into cubes about 3cm on all sides. I take an average sized bay leaf and
break it in half. I drop one half of the bay leaf into the bottom of the
bottle. Add 15mL of olive oil (the traditional method is to use a piece of
pork fat - but I prefer olive oil). Add a layer of meat and sprinkle with a
little fresh ground pepper and a small amount of oregano flakes. Another
layer of meat and spices...so on till the bottle is full - as full as you
can possible stuff it. Add the other half of the bay leaf and another
splash of olive oil. Once you have all the meat bottled - put them in a
water bath on the stove top and bring to a boil. Boil the bottles for 3.5
to 4.5 hours depending on how tender you want the meat. It is important not
to add salt or onions to the bottled meat. The salt will dry out the meat
and onions will impart a bitter taste to the meat. Once the boiling is done
remove the bottles and lay on a counter or board away from the heat of the
stove. A vacuum seal will form and the tops of the bottles will pop shut -
that means you have a perfect seal. The ones that don't pop will have to be
reboiled for about a half an hour or so.

Properly prepared bottled meat will last for at least 4 years. It can be
stored in a dark cool area - a basement is fine - as long as it's out of
direct light. I have eaten it as old as six years and it tasted great.

The meat can be eaten cold or reheated. Here's my favourite recipe. I eat
so much of this that my wife thinks I'm nuts. --

Have a supply of your favourite beer handy. Drink one. Open another.
Take a frying pan - preferably cast iron - and get some pork fat or olive
oil good and hot, drop in lots of chopped and cross cut white onions. Sauté
the onions until you get some juice from them. Add a little beer. Add some
crushed garlic if you like. Open the bottle of meat and drop it in the pan
along with all the juice in the bottle. Remove the pieces of bay leaf and
discard. Next immediately add an appropriate amount of potatoes cut into
quarters (for an average sized potato) and toss them on top. Don't stir.
Salt and pepper to taste. Cover and bring the liquid to a boil. Once
boiling stir only enough to keep from burning onto the bottom. If the stew
starts to go dry add some more of that beer. Once the potatoes are done,
it's all done. Serve it out on a fresh plate, pour some of the liquid from
the pan over it, open a fresh beer and enjoy!!

There ya have it! There are other variations to this recipe - usually other
vegetables are added. Those are fine too but I like mine the best.

Cheers!

Glomis



Ads
  #92 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:08 AM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

kiltyone

Glomis wrote:
Steve Calvin wrote:

How the the moose differ in taste from say pork ribs?


Enormously! Moose would be much closer to beef in taste than pork of
course, but really there's little in common between the taste of moose and
beef either. The taste of moose depends on many factors. Of course it's a
wild animal, so its diet is a big factor. Personally I hunt moose in areas
where there isn't a lot of birch and other deciduous trees. A diet of this
stuff gives a real 'gamey' taste to the meat. I do like the natural

flavour
of the moose meat - but not so much that it overpowers the overall taste.
Hunting in a non-deciduous area is not a difficulty for me, since I live in
a Taiga region - mostly evergreens. Another factor is the 'condition of

the
kill'. If the animal is run down very much then lactic acid will be

present
in the muscle fibers and this will affect how tender the meat is - as well
as the taste. For this reason I will not shoot a running animal, or shoot
at one that I can't kill stone dead with a single shot. Lastly, the

carcass
has to be gutted and cleaned immediately and hung for about three weeks in

a
four degree Celsius controlled environment. Of course a good butcher is a
must too!

I have described the flavour of the meat as basically beef with a milder
milky flavour but not quite to the extent of veal. But again there are so
many factors that affect the flavour.

I typically get some of steak, roast, stew meat, ground (or hamburger)

meat,
and various types of sausage made from the animals I shoot. As well, I
usually bottle about 50Kg of meat - great for camping trips and snowmobile
trips etc.

I know this was far more information that you probably wanted...but there
you have it.

Cheers!

Glomis


I you shoot only animals found in the pine or fir forests do they have a
piny taste to the meat?
We have ours prepared as you have outlined with the exception part of
the hunting party is a certified butcher. All that is done and placed
in a very low...mobile freezer.
When I get around to using them I use a great marinade with natural
maple sugar and other spices. Delicious for ribs, steaks or roasts.
Usually throw in a cup of Bourbon.


Yup, "Cheers!"... and with each successive cup yoose hunter's stories get
better and bigger.

Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .




---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #93 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:08 AM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

kiltyone

Glomis wrote:
Steve Calvin wrote:

How the the moose differ in taste from say pork ribs?


Enormously! Moose would be much closer to beef in taste than pork of
course, but really there's little in common between the taste of moose and
beef either. The taste of moose depends on many factors. Of course it's a
wild animal, so its diet is a big factor. Personally I hunt moose in areas
where there isn't a lot of birch and other deciduous trees. A diet of this
stuff gives a real 'gamey' taste to the meat. I do like the natural

flavour
of the moose meat - but not so much that it overpowers the overall taste.
Hunting in a non-deciduous area is not a difficulty for me, since I live in
a Taiga region - mostly evergreens. Another factor is the 'condition of

the
kill'. If the animal is run down very much then lactic acid will be

present
in the muscle fibers and this will affect how tender the meat is - as well
as the taste. For this reason I will not shoot a running animal, or shoot
at one that I can't kill stone dead with a single shot. Lastly, the

carcass
has to be gutted and cleaned immediately and hung for about three weeks in

a
four degree Celsius controlled environment. Of course a good butcher is a
must too!

I have described the flavour of the meat as basically beef with a milder
milky flavour but not quite to the extent of veal. But again there are so
many factors that affect the flavour.

I typically get some of steak, roast, stew meat, ground (or hamburger)

meat,
and various types of sausage made from the animals I shoot. As well, I
usually bottle about 50Kg of meat - great for camping trips and snowmobile
trips etc.

I know this was far more information that you probably wanted...but there
you have it.

Cheers!

Glomis


I you shoot only animals found in the pine or fir forests do they have a
piny taste to the meat?
We have ours prepared as you have outlined with the exception part of
the hunting party is a certified butcher. All that is done and placed
in a very low...mobile freezer.
When I get around to using them I use a great marinade with natural
maple sugar and other spices. Delicious for ribs, steaks or roasts.
Usually throw in a cup of Bourbon.


Yup, "Cheers!"... and with each successive cup yoose hunter's stories get
better and bigger.

Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .




---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #94 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:08 AM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

kiltyone

Glomis wrote:
Steve Calvin wrote:

How the the moose differ in taste from say pork ribs?


Enormously! Moose would be much closer to beef in taste than pork of
course, but really there's little in common between the taste of moose and
beef either. The taste of moose depends on many factors. Of course it's a
wild animal, so its diet is a big factor. Personally I hunt moose in areas
where there isn't a lot of birch and other deciduous trees. A diet of this
stuff gives a real 'gamey' taste to the meat. I do like the natural

flavour
of the moose meat - but not so much that it overpowers the overall taste.
Hunting in a non-deciduous area is not a difficulty for me, since I live in
a Taiga region - mostly evergreens. Another factor is the 'condition of

the
kill'. If the animal is run down very much then lactic acid will be

present
in the muscle fibers and this will affect how tender the meat is - as well
as the taste. For this reason I will not shoot a running animal, or shoot
at one that I can't kill stone dead with a single shot. Lastly, the

carcass
has to be gutted and cleaned immediately and hung for about three weeks in

a
four degree Celsius controlled environment. Of course a good butcher is a
must too!

I have described the flavour of the meat as basically beef with a milder
milky flavour but not quite to the extent of veal. But again there are so
many factors that affect the flavour.

I typically get some of steak, roast, stew meat, ground (or hamburger)

meat,
and various types of sausage made from the animals I shoot. As well, I
usually bottle about 50Kg of meat - great for camping trips and snowmobile
trips etc.

I know this was far more information that you probably wanted...but there
you have it.

Cheers!

Glomis


I you shoot only animals found in the pine or fir forests do they have a
piny taste to the meat?
We have ours prepared as you have outlined with the exception part of
the hunting party is a certified butcher. All that is done and placed
in a very low...mobile freezer.
When I get around to using them I use a great marinade with natural
maple sugar and other spices. Delicious for ribs, steaks or roasts.
Usually throw in a cup of Bourbon.


Yup, "Cheers!"... and with each successive cup yoose hunter's stories get
better and bigger.

Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .




---= BOYCOTT FRANCE (belgium) GERMANY--SPAIN =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
*********
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
Sheldon
````````````
  #97 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:13 AM
Glomis
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMART01 wrote:

Yup, "Cheers!"... and with each successive cup yoose hunter's stories get
better and bigger.

Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .


LOL - so true!! :-)

Cheers!

burp!


  #98 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:13 AM
Glomis
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMART01 wrote:

Yup, "Cheers!"... and with each successive cup yoose hunter's stories get
better and bigger.

Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .


LOL - so true!! :-)

Cheers!

burp!


  #99 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:13 AM
Glomis
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PENMART01 wrote:

Yup, "Cheers!"... and with each successive cup yoose hunter's stories get
better and bigger.

Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .


LOL - so true!! :-)

Cheers!

burp!


  #100 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:23 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Steve Calvin
wrote:

Glomis wrote:
As well, I usually bottle about 50Kg of meat - great for
camping trips and snowmobile trips etc.


But, "bottled" meat? Don't think that I've heard of that. What's the
process?


I'm guessing he means canning it in jars by way of a steam pressure
canner.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 9/2/04; check the Fairs Fare tab.

  #101 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:23 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Steve Calvin
wrote:

Glomis wrote:
As well, I usually bottle about 50Kg of meat - great for
camping trips and snowmobile trips etc.


But, "bottled" meat? Don't think that I've heard of that. What's the
process?


I'm guessing he means canning it in jars by way of a steam pressure
canner.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 9/2/04; check the Fairs Fare tab.

  #102 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:23 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Steve Calvin
wrote:

Glomis wrote:
As well, I usually bottle about 50Kg of meat - great for
camping trips and snowmobile trips etc.


But, "bottled" meat? Don't think that I've heard of that. What's the
process?


I'm guessing he means canning it in jars by way of a steam pressure
canner.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 9/2/04; check the Fairs Fare tab.

  #103 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:36 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "Glomis"
wrote:

Steve Calvin wrote:


But, "bottled" meat? Don't think that I've heard of that. What's
the process?


I think in the US you refer to it as 'preserves', although this term
may only apply to vegetable matter.


"Preserves" refers to fruit spreads. The general term we use for
preserving fruits, vegetables, soft fruit spreads, or meat products in
glass jars is "canning."
(snip)
A vacuum seal will form and the tops of the bottles will pop
shut - that means you have a perfect seal.


It doesn't, however, mean you have a safe product.

If you're interested in learning about safe home canning methods and
procedures, check out http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/. That's the site,
located at the University of Georgia, of the National Center for Home
Food Preservation. It's the only site currently receiving any United
States Department of Agriculture funding for researching and testing
safe home food preserving methods.

The meat can be eaten cold or reheated. Here's my favourite recipe.
I eat so much of this that my wife thinks I'm nuts. --


She's not alone.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 9/2/04; check the Fairs Fare tab.

  #104 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:36 PM
Melba's Jammin'
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "Glomis"
wrote:

Steve Calvin wrote:


But, "bottled" meat? Don't think that I've heard of that. What's
the process?


I think in the US you refer to it as 'preserves', although this term
may only apply to vegetable matter.


"Preserves" refers to fruit spreads. The general term we use for
preserving fruits, vegetables, soft fruit spreads, or meat products in
glass jars is "canning."
(snip)
A vacuum seal will form and the tops of the bottles will pop
shut - that means you have a perfect seal.


It doesn't, however, mean you have a safe product.

If you're interested in learning about safe home canning methods and
procedures, check out http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/. That's the site,
located at the University of Georgia, of the National Center for Home
Food Preservation. It's the only site currently receiving any United
States Department of Agriculture funding for researching and testing
safe home food preserving methods.

The meat can be eaten cold or reheated. Here's my favourite recipe.
I eat so much of this that my wife thinks I'm nuts. --


She's not alone.
--
-Barb, www.jamlady.eboard.com An update on 9/2/04; check the Fairs Fare tab.

  #105 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2004, 01:54 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In rec.food.cooking, Glomis wrote:

Basically they sat in the fridge for over 24 hours with the dry rub on them
(Montreal Steak spice, garlic powder and chili powder) and I then braised
them at about 100 Celsius for about four hours.


Sounds reasonable. When I make beef short ribs, I smoke them for a
while, but then I finish them off by braising in sauce. Given what you
said about the ribs being very lean, braising makes a lot of sense.


--
....I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

- The Who
 




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