A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » General Cooking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Salami



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 03:26 PM
Tampa Florida
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Salami

Having learned that hard salami is made by fermentation, I now wonder
what is the difference between Genoa Salami and Hard Salami.

I love Supprosatta even though I don't know how to spell it.

I would like to know more about Salamis' and it's use in recipes.

Like I put pepperoni and potatoes in my bean soup.

Chris Dohrmann

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 05:12 PM
The Ranger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 10:26:04 -0400, (Tampa Florida)
wrote:
Having learned that hard salami is made by fermentation,
I now wonder what is the difference between Genoa
Salami and Hard Salami.


Per Epicurious.com:
salami
[suh-LAH-mee]
The name applied to a family of sausages similar to CERVELATS. Both
styles are uncooked but safe to eat without heating because they've
been preserved by curing. Salamis, however, tend to be more boldly
seasoned (particularly with garlic), coarser, drier and, unlike
cervelats, rarely smoked. Salamis are usually air-dried and vary in
size, shape, seasoning and curing process. Though they're usually made
from a mixture of beef and pork, the KOSHER versions are strictly
beef. Among the best-known Italian salamis are Genoa (rich, fatty and
studded with white peppercorns) and cotto (studded with black
peppercorns). The nonpork kosher salamis are cooked and semisoft.
Italian-American favorites include Alesandri and Alpino. FRIZZES and
PEPPERONI are also salami-type sausages. With the casing uncut, whole
dry salamis will keep for several years. Once cut, they should be
tightly wrapped and refrigerated for up to two weeks. Salami is best
served at room temperature and can be eaten as a snack or as part of
an ANTIPASTO platter, or chopped and used in dishes such as soups and
salads. See also SAUSAGE.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

I love Supprosatta even though I don't know how to
spell it.


"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and flavored with black
peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries] between 6-8 weeks. It comes
in very hot and not-so-hot flavors. The hotter variety is made with
ground red pepper. Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy
spelling relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe for preparing
it; it'll have to be later though.

The Ranger
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 05:12 PM
The Ranger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 10:26:04 -0400, (Tampa Florida)
wrote:
Having learned that hard salami is made by fermentation,
I now wonder what is the difference between Genoa
Salami and Hard Salami.


Per Epicurious.com:
salami
[suh-LAH-mee]
The name applied to a family of sausages similar to CERVELATS. Both
styles are uncooked but safe to eat without heating because they've
been preserved by curing. Salamis, however, tend to be more boldly
seasoned (particularly with garlic), coarser, drier and, unlike
cervelats, rarely smoked. Salamis are usually air-dried and vary in
size, shape, seasoning and curing process. Though they're usually made
from a mixture of beef and pork, the KOSHER versions are strictly
beef. Among the best-known Italian salamis are Genoa (rich, fatty and
studded with white peppercorns) and cotto (studded with black
peppercorns). The nonpork kosher salamis are cooked and semisoft.
Italian-American favorites include Alesandri and Alpino. FRIZZES and
PEPPERONI are also salami-type sausages. With the casing uncut, whole
dry salamis will keep for several years. Once cut, they should be
tightly wrapped and refrigerated for up to two weeks. Salami is best
served at room temperature and can be eaten as a snack or as part of
an ANTIPASTO platter, or chopped and used in dishes such as soups and
salads. See also SAUSAGE.

© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

I love Supprosatta even though I don't know how to
spell it.


"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and flavored with black
peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries] between 6-8 weeks. It comes
in very hot and not-so-hot flavors. The hotter variety is made with
ground red pepper. Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy
spelling relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe for preparing
it; it'll have to be later though.

The Ranger
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 07:27 PM
Paul Wolsko
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Italian deli where I buy my Sopressata told me that it is also
soaked in red wine before curing. After it ages 8 weeks, it's dusty and
dry, but is delicious regardless. Generally, I skip the Rolaids and go
for Fernet or Underberg after a Sopressata binge - bite of the dog, so
to speak.

Paul



"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and flavored with black
peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries] between 6-8 weeks. It comes
in very hot and not-so-hot flavors. The hotter variety is made with
ground red pepper. Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy
spelling relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe for preparing
it; it'll have to be later though.

The Ranger

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 07:27 PM
Paul Wolsko
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The Italian deli where I buy my Sopressata told me that it is also
soaked in red wine before curing. After it ages 8 weeks, it's dusty and
dry, but is delicious regardless. Generally, I skip the Rolaids and go
for Fernet or Underberg after a Sopressata binge - bite of the dog, so
to speak.

Paul



"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and flavored with black
peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries] between 6-8 weeks. It comes
in very hot and not-so-hot flavors. The hotter variety is made with
ground red pepper. Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy
spelling relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe for preparing
it; it'll have to be later though.

The Ranger

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 09:19 PM
The Ranger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sopressata Pasta

Ingredients:
Sauce:
1 med. onion, chopped
6 cloves garlic, chopped, not crushed
2 Tbs. butter
1/4 lb. sopressata, cubed
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil, chopped
1 Tbs. red chili flakes
Optional: 1 pkg. dried Crimini mushrooms, reconstituted
1/2 cup Zinfandel wine
1 tsp. black pepper, fresh ground
1/4 cup Italian parsley, chopped
Optional: 1/2 cup chicken stock

Pasta:
6 cups water, boiling
1 Tbs. olive oil
1/4 tsp. salt
1 lb. penne rigate pasta

Method:
Reconstitute mushrooms; drain, do not use liquid from them (filled
with grit) unless you have a lot of patience.

In a large skillet, 10" minimum, sauté onions and garlic together till
translucent. Add in chopped sopressata, sun-dried tomatoes, wine, salt
and peppers. If you want a little extra moisture in your sauce, add in
chicken stock at this point, too. Reduce sauce to desired thickness.
(I'm a little heavy with wine additions so they're very dark.) Add in
parsley towards end of dish.

While sautéing onions and garlic, start water to boiling for pasta.
Cook to doneness you like. (We're mush-eaters, so I cook it to death.)

When sauce is reduced to desired thickness, it should be a deep red;
add in pasta and flip thoroughly.

Serve with remaining Zin and cover with Asiago. Sit back and enjoy.

Bon appetite.

Sidebar: There are hot-hot-hot sopressata with ground red peppers
added inside and out. I made the mistake of using this once. I find it
virtually inedible and ruinous to an enjoyable dish. Adding the red
pepper flakes controls the heat.

The Ranger
---
A splash of wine for the dish; a sip of wine for the cook.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 09:19 PM
The Ranger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sopressata Pasta

Ingredients:
Sauce:
1 med. onion, chopped
6 cloves garlic, chopped, not crushed
2 Tbs. butter
1/4 lb. sopressata, cubed
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil, chopped
1 Tbs. red chili flakes
Optional: 1 pkg. dried Crimini mushrooms, reconstituted
1/2 cup Zinfandel wine
1 tsp. black pepper, fresh ground
1/4 cup Italian parsley, chopped
Optional: 1/2 cup chicken stock

Pasta:
6 cups water, boiling
1 Tbs. olive oil
1/4 tsp. salt
1 lb. penne rigate pasta

Method:
Reconstitute mushrooms; drain, do not use liquid from them (filled
with grit) unless you have a lot of patience.

In a large skillet, 10" minimum, sauté onions and garlic together till
translucent. Add in chopped sopressata, sun-dried tomatoes, wine, salt
and peppers. If you want a little extra moisture in your sauce, add in
chicken stock at this point, too. Reduce sauce to desired thickness.
(I'm a little heavy with wine additions so they're very dark.) Add in
parsley towards end of dish.

While sautéing onions and garlic, start water to boiling for pasta.
Cook to doneness you like. (We're mush-eaters, so I cook it to death.)

When sauce is reduced to desired thickness, it should be a deep red;
add in pasta and flip thoroughly.

Serve with remaining Zin and cover with Asiago. Sit back and enjoy.

Bon appetite.

Sidebar: There are hot-hot-hot sopressata with ground red peppers
added inside and out. I made the mistake of using this once. I find it
virtually inedible and ruinous to an enjoyable dish. Adding the red
pepper flakes controls the heat.

The Ranger
---
A splash of wine for the dish; a sip of wine for the cook.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 10:05 PM
The Ranger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 18:27:21 GMT, Paul Wolsko
wrote:
"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and
flavored with black peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries]
between 6-8 weeks. It comes in very hot and not-so-hot
flavors. The hotter variety is made with ground red pepper.
Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy spelling
relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe
for preparing it; it'll have to be later though.

The Italian deli where I buy my Sopressata told me that it
is also soaked in red wine before curing. After it ages 8
weeks, it's dusty and dry, but is delicious regardless.
Generally, I skip the Rolaids and go for Fernet or
Underberg after a Sopressata binge - bite of the dog,
so to speak.


http://italianfood.about.com/library/rec/blr0510.htm
http://www.ditalia.com/detail.asp?itemNumber=152007
[several dozen other pages of sopressata reveal similar history and
vague ingredients]

None mentioned dunking them in wine prior but that might be an
"enhancement" (marketing fluff).

The Ranger
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 14-08-2004, 10:05 PM
The Ranger
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 14 Aug 2004 18:27:21 GMT, Paul Wolsko
wrote:
"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and
flavored with black peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries]
between 6-8 weeks. It comes in very hot and not-so-hot
flavors. The hotter variety is made with ground red pepper.
Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy spelling
relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe
for preparing it; it'll have to be later though.

The Italian deli where I buy my Sopressata told me that it
is also soaked in red wine before curing. After it ages 8
weeks, it's dusty and dry, but is delicious regardless.
Generally, I skip the Rolaids and go for Fernet or
Underberg after a Sopressata binge - bite of the dog,
so to speak.


http://italianfood.about.com/library/rec/blr0510.htm
http://www.ditalia.com/detail.asp?itemNumber=152007
[several dozen other pages of sopressata reveal similar history and
vague ingredients]

None mentioned dunking them in wine prior but that might be an
"enhancement" (marketing fluff).

The Ranger
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:50 AM
GoombaP
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

A few years ago I gathered bits & pieces of recipes and used this one to
make sopressata. It was excellent. I used a 2nd refrigerator to hang the
sausage.
Yield: 10 Pounds minus shrinkage
10 lb. Pork (Boston butt)
7 T salt
1 T finely ground black pepper
2 T peppercorns
1 t finely ground coriander
1 t finely minced garlic
2 t sugar
1 c dry white wine
1/2 t ascorbic acid and 1 t saltpeter [or 2 t Prague powder]
4-feet large beef casings
Cube the meat. Grind spices together and sprinkle over meat. Grind (large
plate) and add liquid. Mix thoroughly and refrigerate for 48 hours. Stuff
casings. Hang for 8-12 weeks @ 50º F.


"Paul Wolsko" wrote in message
. net...
The Italian deli where I buy my Sopressata told me that it is also
soaked in red wine before curing. After it ages 8 weeks, it's dusty and
dry, but is delicious regardless. Generally, I skip the Rolaids and go
for Fernet or Underberg after a Sopressata binge - bite of the dog, so
to speak.

Paul



"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and flavored with black
peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries] between 6-8 weeks. It comes
in very hot and not-so-hot flavors. The hotter variety is made with
ground red pepper. Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy
spelling relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe for preparing
it; it'll have to be later though.

The Ranger



  #11 (permalink)  
Old 15-08-2004, 08:50 AM
GoombaP
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

A few years ago I gathered bits & pieces of recipes and used this one to
make sopressata. It was excellent. I used a 2nd refrigerator to hang the
sausage.
Yield: 10 Pounds minus shrinkage
10 lb. Pork (Boston butt)
7 T salt
1 T finely ground black pepper
2 T peppercorns
1 t finely ground coriander
1 t finely minced garlic
2 t sugar
1 c dry white wine
1/2 t ascorbic acid and 1 t saltpeter [or 2 t Prague powder]
4-feet large beef casings
Cube the meat. Grind spices together and sprinkle over meat. Grind (large
plate) and add liquid. Mix thoroughly and refrigerate for 48 hours. Stuff
casings. Hang for 8-12 weeks @ 50º F.


"Paul Wolsko" wrote in message
. net...
The Italian deli where I buy my Sopressata told me that it is also
soaked in red wine before curing. After it ages 8 weeks, it's dusty and
dry, but is delicious regardless. Generally, I skip the Rolaids and go
for Fernet or Underberg after a Sopressata binge - bite of the dog, so
to speak.

Paul



"Sopressata" A salami made from cured-dry pork and flavored with black
peppercorns. This meat cures [air-dries] between 6-8 weeks. It comes
in very hot and not-so-hot flavors. The hotter variety is made with
ground red pepper. Beware purchasing this type unless you enjoy
spelling relief "R-O-L-A-I-D-S."

I'll dig through my archives and post my favorite recipe for preparing
it; it'll have to be later though.

The Ranger



 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Danish salami Leo Scanlon General Cooking 14 25-07-2005 03:56 AM
SALAMI on BBQ need recipe please Jacques Lorrain Barbecue 19 30-07-2004 11:59 PM
SALAMI recipe on BBQ neede please Jacques Lorrain General Cooking 0 25-06-2004 04:16 PM
Salami and Eggs (Serves 6) Duckie ® Recipes 0 31-01-2004 05:53 PM
Three Cheese and Salami Pie Duckie ® Recipes 0 30-01-2004 01:03 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright ©2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.