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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Cornstarch vs. flour in pudding?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 19-11-2009, 07:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Cornstarch vs. flour in pudding?


"Pudding" in the American sense of the word, that is.

I tried a simple, eggless chocolate pudding cooked with flour and it
seemed to work just as well as cornstarch. Since flour is cheaper,
what's the advantage of cornstarch?

However, vanilla pudding (the same recipe, minus the cocoa) always
burns no matter how careful I am, so I assume using flour wouldn't
help.


Lenona.
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 19-11-2009, 09:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,875
Default Cornstarch vs. flour in pudding?

Lenona wrote:
"Pudding" in the American sense of the word, that is.

I tried a simple, eggless chocolate pudding cooked with flour and it
seemed to work just as well as cornstarch. Since flour is cheaper,
what's the advantage of cornstarch?

However, vanilla pudding (the same recipe, minus the cocoa) always
burns no matter how careful I am, so I assume using flour wouldn't
help.

I always use cornstarch. It thickens quickly and has a neutral taste.
If you are stirring constantly over a low heat you should not have a
problem with burning. For the amount of corn starch used I can't see
price being a concern. It's not that expensive.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 20-11-2009, 03:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,445
Default Cornstarch vs. flour in pudding?


"Lenona" wrote in message
...

"Pudding" in the American sense of the word, that is.

I tried a simple, eggless chocolate pudding cooked with flour and it
seemed to work just as well as cornstarch. Since flour is cheaper,
what's the advantage of cornstarch?

However, vanilla pudding (the same recipe, minus the cocoa) always
burns no matter how careful I am, so I assume using flour wouldn't
help.


Lenona.


Read he http://www.foodsubs.com/ThickenStarch.html

Flour will leave a starchy taste (unless cooked for an extended period) and
an opaque result, corn starch does not have the starchy taste and the
thickened product is clearer than using flour - also the "sheen' appearance
is different.


--
Dimitri

Mirepoix

http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 20-11-2009, 05:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 426
Default Cornstarch vs. flour in pudding?

Dimitri wrote:


"Lenona" wrote in message
...

"Pudding" in the American sense of the word, that is.

I tried a simple, eggless chocolate pudding cooked with flour and it
seemed to work just as well as cornstarch. Since flour is cheaper,
what's the advantage of cornstarch?

However, vanilla pudding (the same recipe, minus the cocoa) always
burns no matter how careful I am, so I assume using flour wouldn't
help.


Read he http://www.foodsubs.com/ThickenStarch.html

Flour will leave a starchy taste (unless cooked for an extended period)
and an opaque result, corn starch does not have the starchy taste and
the thickened product is clearer than using flour - also the "sheen'
appearance is different.



You're on the right track, but I would add that
your standard pastry cream recipe is flour thickened
and I've never detected a starchy taste to it after all
the many times I've made it. I'd even say I like it better
than corn starch thickened preparations. This is one
of the many cases where tasting trumps reading.

--
Reg
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 20-11-2009, 05:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default Cornstarch vs. flour in pudding?


"RegForte" wrote in message
...
Dimitri wrote:


"Lenona" wrote in message
...

"Pudding" in the American sense of the word, that is.

I tried a simple, eggless chocolate pudding cooked with flour and it
seemed to work just as well as cornstarch. Since flour is cheaper,
what's the advantage of cornstarch?

However, vanilla pudding (the same recipe, minus the cocoa) always
burns no matter how careful I am, so I assume using flour wouldn't
help.


Read he http://www.foodsubs.com/ThickenStarch.html

Flour will leave a starchy taste (unless cooked for an extended period)
and an opaque result, corn starch does not have the starchy taste and the
thickened product is clearer than using flour - also the "sheen'
appearance is different.



You're on the right track, but I would add that
your standard pastry cream recipe is flour thickened
and I've never detected a starchy taste to it after all
the many times I've made it. I'd even say I like it better
than corn starch thickened preparations. This is one
of the many cases where tasting trumps reading.

Horse shit.


 




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