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Cuban cooking: "boliche"



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 02:40 PM
J Krugman
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"



I want to make a braised beef recipe that I got from a Cuban friend.
This recipe calls for a cut that Cubans call "boliche", but that
probably has no perfect equivalent in the US, since the animal is
cut differently in the two countries. Does anybody know what part
of the animal "boliche" comes from? And what's the American cut
that's closest to boliche?

Thanks!

Jill

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 02:49 PM
Jack Schidt®
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"


"J Krugman" wrote in message
...


I want to make a braised beef recipe that I got from a Cuban friend.
This recipe calls for a cut that Cubans call "boliche", but that
probably has no perfect equivalent in the US, since the animal is
cut differently in the two countries. Does anybody know what part
of the animal "boliche" comes from? And what's the American cut
that's closest to boliche?

Thanks!

Jill


Eye Round, not to be confused with that Asian term of endearment "Round
Eye".

Jack Biff



  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 03:02 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

J Krugman writes:

I want to make a braised beef recipe that I got from a Cuban friend.
This recipe calls for a cut that Cubans call "boliche", but that
probably has no perfect equivalent in the US, since the animal is
cut differently in the two countries. Does anybody know what part
of the animal "boliche" comes from? And what's the American cut
that's closest to boliche?


My Spanish dictionary says boliche means "jack" (small balls) [for bowling]
skittles

There are many meat cuts that can be used, chuck, round...

You need to learn how to search: boliche recipe... many hits.

http://www.foodtv.com/food/recipes/r..._11908,00.html

Boliche
Recipe courtesy El Camaguey, Los Angeles

5 to 6 pounds Eye Round beef
6 garlic cloves, mashed
1/2 teaspoon ground oregano
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 bay leaf
3 tablespoons bitter orange juice
1 cup dry white cooking wine
3 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/2 pound ham in small cubes
1 carrot, sliced
1/2 green bell pepper, cut in medium size pieces
1/2 red bell pepper, cut in medium size pieces
2 small Cuban-style chorizos, sliced
1/4 cup vegetable oil
8 ounces tomato sauce
Topping:
1 sliced seared onion
2 fried ripe plantains
Steak fries

Clean the meat by trimming excess fat. With a knife make an opening through the
center of the meat. Place the meat in a large pot. To prepare marinade, mix
garlic, oregano, cumin, bay leaf, bitter orange juice, cooking wine, salt and
pepper. Add 3 tablespoons of the marinade to the opening inside the meat. In
another container mix the stuffing: ham, carrot, bell peppers and chorizo then
place the stuffing inside the meat. Add the rest of the marinade to the outside
of the meat. For best results let the meat sit overnight or at least 3 hours,
refrigerated.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large frying pan heat cooking oil and
remove meat from marinade. Place meat in a hot frying pan, and sear the meat;
browning it gives the meat flavor. Add the remaining marinade, cover and place
in oven for approximately 3 hours. Let the meat cool before cutting it in
slices. Combine the tomato sauce with the marinade that remained in the pan and
put this mixture in a saucepan and simmer for 3 minutes. Pour over the sliced
meat, and add the toppings and serve.
---


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 03:16 PM
Jill
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

Hi Jill,

Living near Tampa where there is a huge Cuban influence I have seen many
variations of Boliche. The cut most often used for this dish around here is
eye round.
I did a quick Google search and saw recipes using eye round (Food TV
Network) and some others using various chuck roasts.

Hope that helps.. (another) Jill

"J Krugman" wrote in message
...


I want to make a braised beef recipe that I got from a Cuban friend.
This recipe calls for a cut that Cubans call "boliche", but that
probably has no perfect equivalent in the US, since the animal is
cut differently in the two countries. Does anybody know what part
of the animal "boliche" comes from? And what's the American cut
that's closest to boliche?

Thanks!

Jill



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 05:36 PM
J Krugman
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"


In (PENMART01) writes:

There are many meat cuts that can be used, chuck, round...


You need to learn how to search: boliche recipe... many hits.


I did, but the results were confusing and contrary to my experience
of the dish...

I'm beginning to suspect that the problem has to do with the
information I got from my friend. She called the *cut of meat*
"boliche", but I think that what she meant (or should have meant)
was "the cut used in [a different dish called] boliche".

So I was searching for "boliche, the cut" not "boliche, the dish".

In all the boliche recipes I've found, including the one you posted,
the meat is stuffed with chorizo and/or ham, which is decidedly
*not* the case with the recipe I am trying to make. (I'm trying
to make *Cuban* carne asada, though searching for "carne asada"
gives me a million recipes for *Mexican* carne asada, and none for
the Cuban version.)

Another thing that threw me off is that I thought the eye of round
cut was a large boxlike cut, something with the dimensions of a
1/2 gallon carton, and which is different from what I recall of my
friend's recipe, namely a slenderer, *log-like* cut of meat, closer
in dimension to a wine bottle without the neck. Adding to this
confusion, there was one search result in which the explicit
distinction was made between the "eye of round" cut and "the eye
of the round". I interpreted this to mean that Cuban butchers cut
out a *part* of what we call "eye of round", and this part is the
eye of the round proper.

So you see, I did search, but I just got *very* confused!

Jill

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 05:39 PM
J Krugman
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

In "Jill" writes:

Hi Jill,


Living near Tampa where there is a huge Cuban influence I have seen many
variations of Boliche.


What about "carne asada"? What do the local Cubans use for that?

Thanks!

Jill

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 06:51 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

J Krugman wrote:

I want to make a braised beef recipe that I got from a Cuban friend.
This recipe calls for a cut that Cubans call "boliche", but that
probably has no perfect equivalent in the US, since the animal is
cut differently in the two countries. Does anybody know what part
of the animal "boliche" comes from? And what's the American cut
that's closest to boliche?

Thanks!

Jill


Boliche is the eye round. Usually a whole eye round that is perforated
lengthwise and stuffed with either chorizo or ham.

Here is a recipe, translated from Nitza Villapol's "Cocina al Minuto":

"Carne mechada" (boliche)

1 eye round (about 3 pounds)
1/4 pound ham
1 slice of bacon
1 sour orange (or use juice of 3 or 4 limes
1/2 large onion
1 clove of garlic
3 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp dry sherry
1 large green pepper
1 sprig of parsley
3 laurel leaves
2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp MSG

With a sharp knife make a cut lengthwise from each end of the meat. Cut the
ham into long slices and puch the ham and bacon into the cuts. Marinate the
meat with the sour orange juice, sliced onion, parsley, sliced green pepper,
mashed garlic, laurel and pepper.

Drain the meat, reserving the marinade. Brown the meat on all sides in the
oil. Add the sherry, salt, MSG and the liquid from the marinade. Cook at low
temperature in a covered pot for approximately an hour and a half.

Slice across in slices about half to three quarter inch thick. Serve with the
gravy.

This would probably be perfect too cook in a crockpot. Adjust time as needed.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 07:00 PM
J Krugman
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"



aasainz, thanks for translating/transcribing the Nitza Villapol
recipe!

Jill
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 07:15 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

J Krugman wrote:

In (PENMART01) writes:

There are many meat cuts that can be used, chuck, round...


You need to learn how to search: boliche recipe... many hits.


I did, but the results were confusing and contrary to my experience
of the dish...

I'm beginning to suspect that the problem has to do with the
information I got from my friend. She called the *cut of meat*
"boliche", but I think that what she meant (or should have meant)
was "the cut used in [a different dish called] boliche".

So I was searching for "boliche, the cut" not "boliche, the dish".

In all the boliche recipes I've found, including the one you posted,
the meat is stuffed with chorizo and/or ham, which is decidedly
*not* the case with the recipe I am trying to make. (I'm trying
to make *Cuban* carne asada, though searching for "carne asada"
gives me a million recipes for *Mexican* carne asada, and none for
the Cuban version.)

Another thing that threw me off is that I thought the eye of round
cut was a large boxlike cut, something with the dimensions of a
1/2 gallon carton, and which is different from what I recall of my
friend's recipe, namely a slenderer, *log-like* cut of meat, closer
in dimension to a wine bottle without the neck. Adding to this
confusion, there was one search result in which the explicit
distinction was made between the "eye of round" cut and "the eye
of the round". I interpreted this to mean that Cuban butchers cut
out a *part* of what we call "eye of round", and this part is the
eye of the round proper.

So you see, I did search, but I just got *very* confused!

Jill


OK, again from Nitza Villapol:

Carne asada con naranja

1 boliche (about 3 pounds)
1 tsp meat tenderizer
1 large onion
1 green pepper
2 cloves of garlic
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 sour orange (or juice of three or four limes)
6 prunes, no seeds
1/4 pound sweet ham, sliced

-------------

2 slices of bacon
1 clove of garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup dry sherry
3 or 4 oranges (sweet, not sour)

Clean the boliche, prick with a fork and sprinkle with the meat tenderizer.
Perforate the meat with a sharp knife, making six holes. Place the prunes
wrapped in the ham slices.

Prepare a marinade with the mashed garlic, black pepper, sour orange juice.
Pour over the meat adding the sliced onion and sliced green pepper. Marinate
for at least 3 hours. It can be done the day before.

Heat a pot and fry the bacon slices until the fat is rendered. Drain the
boliche and brown in the fat until it is browned. Add the wine and the juice
of two oranges. Cook well covered at a low heat until it is tender. Add orange
juice as needed to make sure it does not scorch.

Slice across, half to three quarter inches thick slices. Pour the gravy on
top.

8 portions.

This is the second time I post a recipe quoting from Nitza Villapol's book.
She was a Cuban chef who published her recipes in a book called "Cocina al
Minuto". This book has been translated into English and you can probably find
it by doing a search in Google or in one of the bookstores. The book may be
under another author's name since her helper translated the book and published
it under her (the helper's) own name. Can you kids spell plagiarism?

If you have ever tasted black bean soup you should really try her recipe.
After you try it you may never like anyone else's version.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 07:18 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

J Krugman wrote:

In "Jill" writes:

Hi Jill,


Living near Tampa where there is a huge Cuban influence I have seen many
variations of Boliche.


What about "carne asada"? What do the local Cubans use for that?

Thanks!

Jill


Eye round, "boliche". Very similar dishes. I live in Miami and you can find
both boliche and carne asada in just about any latin restaurant. Ther are many
variation of this dish.
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 07:42 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

J Krugman wrote:

aasainz, thanks for translating/transcribing the Nitza Villapol
recipe!

Jill


My pleasure. Nitza Villapol was known as "the Cuban Julia Childs". She had a
TV show back in the pre-* times.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2003, 12:58 AM
Richard Periut
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

AM wrote:
J Krugman wrote:

In
(PENMART01) writes:


There are many meat cuts that can be used, chuck, round...


You need to learn how to search: boliche recipe... many hits.


I did, but the results were confusing and contrary to my experience
of the dish...

I'm beginning to suspect that the problem has to do with the
information I got from my friend. She called the *cut of meat*
"boliche", but I think that what she meant (or should have meant)
was "the cut used in [a different dish called] boliche".

So I was searching for "boliche, the cut" not "boliche, the dish".

In all the boliche recipes I've found, including the one you posted,
the meat is stuffed with chorizo and/or ham, which is decidedly
*not* the case with the recipe I am trying to make. (I'm trying
to make *Cuban* carne asada, though searching for "carne asada"
gives me a million recipes for *Mexican* carne asada, and none for
the Cuban version.)

Another thing that threw me off is that I thought the eye of round
cut was a large boxlike cut, something with the dimensions of a
1/2 gallon carton, and which is different from what I recall of my
friend's recipe, namely a slenderer, *log-like* cut of meat, closer
in dimension to a wine bottle without the neck. Adding to this
confusion, there was one search result in which the explicit
distinction was made between the "eye of round" cut and "the eye
of the round". I interpreted this to mean that Cuban butchers cut
out a *part* of what we call "eye of round", and this part is the
eye of the round proper.

So you see, I did search, but I just got *very* confused!

Jill



OK, again from Nitza Villapol:

Carne asada con naranja

1 boliche (about 3 pounds)
1 tsp meat tenderizer
1 large onion
1 green pepper
2 cloves of garlic
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 sour orange (or juice of three or four limes)
6 prunes, no seeds
1/4 pound sweet ham, sliced

-------------

2 slices of bacon
1 clove of garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup dry sherry
3 or 4 oranges (sweet, not sour)

Clean the boliche, prick with a fork and sprinkle with the meat tenderizer.
Perforate the meat with a sharp knife, making six holes. Place the prunes
wrapped in the ham slices.

Prepare a marinade with the mashed garlic, black pepper, sour orange juice.
Pour over the meat adding the sliced onion and sliced green pepper. Marinate
for at least 3 hours. It can be done the day before.

Heat a pot and fry the bacon slices until the fat is rendered. Drain the
boliche and brown in the fat until it is browned. Add the wine and the juice
of two oranges. Cook well covered at a low heat until it is tender. Add orange
juice as needed to make sure it does not scorch.

Slice across, half to three quarter inches thick slices. Pour the gravy on
top.

8 portions.

This is the second time I post a recipe quoting from Nitza Villapol's book.
She was a Cuban chef who published her recipes in a book called "Cocina al
Minuto". This book has been translated into English and you can probably find
it by doing a search in Google or in one of the bookstores. The book may be
under another author's name since her helper translated the book and published
it under her (the helper's) own name. Can you kids spell plagiarism?

If you have ever tasted black bean soup you should really try her recipe.
After you try it you may never like anyone else's version.


Yes, she certainly was the Julia Childs of Cuba. She died a couple of
years ago in Cuba. And yes, the book was published with out her (eh hem,
Castro's) permission ; )

The black beans are the best variation I've ever had. Ths sugar and
vinegar I think is what makes the dish better. However, I don't go
through the initial process of softening the beans; I take the first two
step, and incorporate them in one by using the pressure cooker. Comes
out just as good.

Saludos,

Richard

--
"..A census taker once tried to test me. I ate his liver with some fava
beans and a nice chianti..."

Hannibal "The Cannibal"

Silence Of The Lambs 1991

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2003, 02:31 AM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"

Richard Periut wrote:

AM wrote:
J Krugman wrote:

In
(PENMART01) writes:


There are many meat cuts that can be used, chuck, round...

You need to learn how to search: boliche recipe... many hits.

I did, but the results were confusing and contrary to my experience
of the dish...

I'm beginning to suspect that the problem has to do with the
information I got from my friend. She called the *cut of meat*
"boliche", but I think that what she meant (or should have meant)
was "the cut used in [a different dish called] boliche".

So I was searching for "boliche, the cut" not "boliche, the dish".

In all the boliche recipes I've found, including the one you posted,
the meat is stuffed with chorizo and/or ham, which is decidedly
*not* the case with the recipe I am trying to make. (I'm trying
to make *Cuban* carne asada, though searching for "carne asada"
gives me a million recipes for *Mexican* carne asada, and none for
the Cuban version.)

Another thing that threw me off is that I thought the eye of round
cut was a large boxlike cut, something with the dimensions of a
1/2 gallon carton, and which is different from what I recall of my
friend's recipe, namely a slenderer, *log-like* cut of meat, closer
in dimension to a wine bottle without the neck. Adding to this
confusion, there was one search result in which the explicit
distinction was made between the "eye of round" cut and "the eye
of the round". I interpreted this to mean that Cuban butchers cut
out a *part* of what we call "eye of round", and this part is the
eye of the round proper.

So you see, I did search, but I just got *very* confused!

Jill



OK, again from Nitza Villapol:

Carne asada con naranja

1 boliche (about 3 pounds)
1 tsp meat tenderizer
1 large onion
1 green pepper
2 cloves of garlic
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 sour orange (or juice of three or four limes)
6 prunes, no seeds
1/4 pound sweet ham, sliced

-------------

2 slices of bacon
1 clove of garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup dry sherry
3 or 4 oranges (sweet, not sour)

Clean the boliche, prick with a fork and sprinkle with the meat tenderizer.
Perforate the meat with a sharp knife, making six holes. Place the prunes
wrapped in the ham slices.

Prepare a marinade with the mashed garlic, black pepper, sour orange juice.
Pour over the meat adding the sliced onion and sliced green pepper. Marinate
for at least 3 hours. It can be done the day before.

Heat a pot and fry the bacon slices until the fat is rendered. Drain the
boliche and brown in the fat until it is browned. Add the wine and the juice
of two oranges. Cook well covered at a low heat until it is tender. Add orange
juice as needed to make sure it does not scorch.

Slice across, half to three quarter inches thick slices. Pour the gravy on
top.

8 portions.

This is the second time I post a recipe quoting from Nitza Villapol's book.
She was a Cuban chef who published her recipes in a book called "Cocina al
Minuto". This book has been translated into English and you can probably find
it by doing a search in Google or in one of the bookstores. The book may be
under another author's name since her helper translated the book and published
it under her (the helper's) own name. Can you kids spell plagiarism?

If you have ever tasted black bean soup you should really try her recipe.
After you try it you may never like anyone else's version.


Yes, she certainly was the Julia Childs of Cuba. She died a couple of
years ago in Cuba. And yes, the book was published with out her (eh hem,
Castro's) permission ; )

The black beans are the best variation I've ever had. Ths sugar and
vinegar I think is what makes the dish better. However, I don't go
through the initial process of softening the beans; I take the first two
step, and incorporate them in one by using the pressure cooker. Comes
out just as good.

Saludos,

Richard


You have to remember that the recipe was written with the expectation of
"difficult to soften" beans. Black beans available in the US get softened
easily and don't require the presoak she recommends. I don't like to use the
pressure cooker. I prefer to just cook them in a pot until soft.

I do modify the recipe by adding two ingredients. One leaf of "culantro" and
one or two cachucha peppers. I haven't yet figured out what the name of
culantro is in English. It is not cilantro. It is a longish leaf, about 4 or
so inches with a serrated edge and a pungent taste. In Puerto Rico it is
called "recao". The cachucha pepper looks a bit like habaneros but it is
totally sweet.

I love her recipe for potato salad where she subtitutes part of the mayo with
cream cheese.

Saludos

Bert
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2003, 03:35 AM
Richard Periut
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"



AM wrote:
Richard Periut wrote:

wrote:

J Krugman wrote:


In
(PENMART01) writes:



There are many meat cuts that can be used, chuck, round...

You need to learn how to search: boliche recipe... many hits.

I did, but the results were confusing and contrary to my experience
of the dish...

I'm beginning to suspect that the problem has to do with the
information I got from my friend. She called the *cut of meat*
"boliche", but I think that what she meant (or should have meant)
was "the cut used in [a different dish called] boliche".

So I was searching for "boliche, the cut" not "boliche, the dish".

In all the boliche recipes I've found, including the one you posted,
the meat is stuffed with chorizo and/or ham, which is decidedly
*not* the case with the recipe I am trying to make. (I'm trying
to make *Cuban* carne asada, though searching for "carne asada"
gives me a million recipes for *Mexican* carne asada, and none for
the Cuban version.)

Another thing that threw me off is that I thought the eye of round
cut was a large boxlike cut, something with the dimensions of a
1/2 gallon carton, and which is different from what I recall of my
friend's recipe, namely a slenderer, *log-like* cut of meat, closer
in dimension to a wine bottle without the neck. Adding to this
confusion, there was one search result in which the explicit
distinction was made between the "eye of round" cut and "the eye
of the round". I interpreted this to mean that Cuban butchers cut
out a *part* of what we call "eye of round", and this part is the
eye of the round proper.

So you see, I did search, but I just got *very* confused!

Jill


OK, again from Nitza Villapol:

Carne asada con naranja

1 boliche (about 3 pounds)
1 tsp meat tenderizer
1 large onion
1 green pepper
2 cloves of garlic
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 sour orange (or juice of three or four limes)
6 prunes, no seeds
1/4 pound sweet ham, sliced

-------------

2 slices of bacon
1 clove of garlic
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup dry sherry
3 or 4 oranges (sweet, not sour)

Clean the boliche, prick with a fork and sprinkle with the meat tenderizer.
Perforate the meat with a sharp knife, making six holes. Place the prunes
wrapped in the ham slices.

Prepare a marinade with the mashed garlic, black pepper, sour orange juice.
Pour over the meat adding the sliced onion and sliced green pepper. Marinate
for at least 3 hours. It can be done the day before.

Heat a pot and fry the bacon slices until the fat is rendered. Drain the
boliche and brown in the fat until it is browned. Add the wine and the juice
of two oranges. Cook well covered at a low heat until it is tender. Add orange
juice as needed to make sure it does not scorch.

Slice across, half to three quarter inches thick slices. Pour the gravy on
top.

8 portions.

This is the second time I post a recipe quoting from Nitza Villapol's book.
She was a Cuban chef who published her recipes in a book called "Cocina al
Minuto". This book has been translated into English and you can probably find
it by doing a search in Google or in one of the bookstores. The book may be
under another author's name since her helper translated the book and published
it under her (the helper's) own name. Can you kids spell plagiarism?

If you have ever tasted black bean soup you should really try her recipe.
After you try it you may never like anyone else's version.


Yes, she certainly was the Julia Childs of Cuba. She died a couple of
years ago in Cuba. And yes, the book was published with out her (eh hem,
Castro's) permission ; )

The black beans are the best variation I've ever had. Ths sugar and
vinegar I think is what makes the dish better. However, I don't go
through the initial process of softening the beans; I take the first two
step, and incorporate them in one by using the pressure cooker. Comes
out just as good.

Saludos,

Richard



You have to remember that the recipe was written with the expectation of
"difficult to soften" beans. Black beans available in the US get softened
easily and don't require the presoak she recommends. I don't like to use the
pressure cooker. I prefer to just cook them in a pot until soft.


Try it with the pressure cooker, and you'll see there is no big
difference. Matter of fact, I like the consistency of the beans more.

I do modify the recipe by adding two ingredients. One leaf of "culantro" and
one or two cachucha peppers. I haven't yet figured out what the name of
culantro is in English. It is not cilantro. It is a longish leaf, about 4 or
so inches with a serrated edge and a pungent taste. In Puerto Rico it is
called "recao".


Yes, it smells alot like cilantro. My wife uses it (she's Dominican)
when making her Jaba (?spelling) beans, and they really give the dish
that extra oomph.


The cachucha pepper looks a bit like habaneros but it is
totally sweet.


I don't think Cubans use that pepper very often (at least I never saw my
mother cook with it,) but my wife introduced me to it when she makes
certain sofritos, et cetera, and I've fallen in love with the special
and unique perfume they give off. BTW, I do enjoy my home grown
Habaneros with their excellent fruitiness and heat. How ironic, the
Habanero has nothing to do with Cuba, and Cubans don't use it because
even black pepper is considered too hot for most Cuban palates.
I love her recipe for potato salad where she subtitutes part of the mayo with
cream cheese.

Saludos

Bert



Gotta try that one. I really only use her recipes for traditional Cuban
food. Her pastries (like most other Latin American ones,) are just too
sweet for my tooth. Too much sugar in there.

However, what I have to give her most credit for, is for educating the
Cubans of the era, about international classics.

I must admit that Cuban cuisine, with the exception of Black Beans and
Ropa Vieja, is not terribly exciting nor unique to Cubans. It's just the
same old blend of Spanish, African, and a slight Indigenous influence,
with various twists.

Are you from PR? One of my favorite dishes is a nice mofongo : ) Now I
am craving for one : ) Have a good recipe for one?

Saludos,

Richard

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 04-11-2003, 03:48 AM
Foxy Lady
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Cuban cooking: "boliche"


wrote in message
...

snip

You have to remember that the recipe was written with the expectation of
"difficult to soften" beans. Black beans available in the US get softened
easily and don't require the presoak she recommends. I don't like to use

the
pressure cooker. I prefer to just cook them in a pot until soft.

I do modify the recipe by adding two ingredients. One leaf of "culantro"

and
one or two cachucha peppers. I haven't yet figured out what the name of
culantro is in English. It is not cilantro. It is a longish leaf, about 4

or
so inches with a serrated edge and a pungent taste. In Puerto Rico it is
called "recao". The cachucha pepper looks a bit like habaneros but it is
totally sweet.

I love her recipe for potato salad where she subtitutes part of the mayo

with
cream cheese.

Saludos

Bert



Saludos Bert!!!

Culantro!!! How can anyone cook Puerto Rican food without it??? I receive
CARE packages of it from my mom and when she comes to visit us in Maryland
she brings small plants (leaves and root systems) wrapped in wet paper
towels and then all wrapped in aluminum foil. I have many of them in pots
all over my house. She also sends me the cachuca peppers (ajies dulces, or
ajicitos). I save the seeds and plant them in whatever is available. All of
the plants (recao and ajicitos) have thrived here despite the weather.
Summer & spring, outside... fall & winter, inside.

Culantro is Puerto Rican Coriander... Eryngium foetidum is its botanical
name... you can buy it in Vietnamese markets where it's called ngo gai... or
in Caribbean markets where it's called Shadow Benny...

Our local supermarket (Weis) sells fresh herb plants with soil in plastic
bags for $1.99. I hardly go there because I love the local farmer's markets
and also because we live in an area where there are plenty of farms... but
this day I went to but cilantro when lo and behold, there right before my
eyes was a bag labeled Cilantro but it had Culantro in it!!! It's a Florida
company that sells both herbs so I guess someone messed up... but I was very
happy!!! Unfortunately they straightened it out and I haven't seen another
culantro plant since.

Thanks for mentioning both of these essential ingredients...

Sandra




 




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