A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » General Cooking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Browning Flour



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 04:14 AM
Joelle
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour, but I've come
across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then add oil, and is
this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry pan until it's
brown? Anything more to it?
Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or can you just make a
roux?

Joelle
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 05:00 AM
zxcvbob
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

Joelle wrote:
Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour, but I've come
across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then add oil, and is
this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry pan until it's
brown? Anything more to it?
Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or can you just make a
roux?

Joelle



Don't brown the flour first unless you are trying to leave out the oil.
Browning dry flour without burning it is a real pain in the ass. But you
can brown about a pound of it in the oven (stir frequently) and use it for
a half dozen batches of gumbo without having to make a roux.

Mix the browned flour with the sauted bell peppers, onions, and celery
right before you add the tomatoes and stock.

Best regards,
Bob

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 04:35 PM
PENMART01
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

(Joelle) writes:

Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour, but I've come
across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then add oil, and is
this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry pan until it's
brown? Anything more to it?
Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or can you just make
a roux?


More often than not the dishes concocted in commercail establishments are
prepared with oil-less rouxs... a great time and labour saver and results in
far more uniform and superiour product.

--- http://www.unichef.com/oillessroux.htm


---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =---
Sheldon
````````````
"Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 07:55 PM
Rick & Cyndi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

"Joelle" wrote in message
...
: Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour,
but I've come
: across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then add
oil, and is
: this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry
pan until it's
: brown? Anything more to it?
: Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or can
you just make a
: roux?
:
: Joelle
======

Hi Joelle!

Yep - there's a big difference. You can still do your roux the
way you've always done; however, if you brown the flour first -
you will have a deeper and more complex flavor to your roux.
Once you do brown - you won't go back to plain white... VBG.

Seriously, the flavor with the browned flour is SO much better!

Cyndi
Remove a "b" to reply


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 07:59 PM
Rick & Cyndi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
: Joelle wrote:
: Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour,
but I've come
: across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then
add oil, and is
: this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry
pan until it's
: brown? Anything more to it?
: Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or
can you just make a
: roux?
:
: Joelle
:
:
: Don't brown the flour first unless you are trying to leave out
the oil.
: Browning dry flour without burning it is a real pain in the
ass. But you
: can brown about a pound of it in the oven (stir frequently) and
use it for
: a half dozen batches of gumbo without having to make a roux.
:
: Mix the browned flour with the sauted bell peppers, onions, and
celery
: right before you add the tomatoes and stock.
:
: Best regards,
: Bob
: ========

Huh. Ya know, I hear that a lot but (luckily) I've never had any
problems with dry frying the flour on the stove top. But I might
have a slight advantage with the lighting... I have a double
oven range with back-lighting just behind the burners. It makes
it much easier to tell when the flour is getting to that perfect
dark tan color.

FWIW, I also use butter (not oil) in my roux... makes for a great
flavor.

Cyndi
Remove a "b" to reply


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 09:08 PM
Joelle
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

Seriously, the flavor with the browned flour is SO much better!

Even compared to standing slavishly over the roux for 45 minutes to get it a
nice brown color? Or is this a quicker way to get a dark brown roux?

Joelle
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-11-2003, 11:30 PM
Rick & Cyndi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

"Joelle" wrote in message
...
: Seriously, the flavor with the browned flour is SO much
better!
:
: Even compared to standing slavishly over the roux for 45
minutes to get it a
: nice brown color? Or is this a quicker way to get a dark brown
roux?
:
: Joelle
===========

Waaaayyyy quicker! Depending upon size of pan and amount of
flour... You can have a terrific roux in less than 15 minutes;
which includes the browning of the flour, adding the butter and
letting the two marry in the pan for a few minutes.


--
Cyndi
Remove a "b" to reply


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 04:20 AM
Joelle
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

. You can have a terrific roux in less than 15 minutes;
which includes the browning of the flour, adding the butter and
letting the two marry in the pan for a few minutes.


Okay I'm sold but I'm still a little in the dark about the technique of
browning flour. This is done in the oven? In the pan?

Joelle
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 01:44 PM
Peter Aitken
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

"zxcvbob" wrote in message
...
Joelle wrote:
Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour, but I've

come
across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then add oil, and

is
this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry pan until

it's
brown? Anything more to it?
Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or can you just

make a
roux?

Joelle



Don't brown the flour first unless you are trying to leave out the oil.
Browning dry flour without burning it is a real pain in the ass. But you
can brown about a pound of it in the oven (stir frequently) and use it for
a half dozen batches of gumbo without having to make a roux.

Mix the browned flour with the sauted bell peppers, onions, and celery
right before you add the tomatoes and stock.

Best regards,
Bob


I disagree - browning flour dry is not a problem and I think it gives a
diffferent taste than if it is browned in oil. I use a nonstick pan over
medium heat, using a spatula to move the flour around every minute or so.
Works fine - just be careful not to use too high a heat or it will burn. It
takes at least several minutes to brown properly.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-11-2003, 06:05 PM
Rick & Cyndi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Browning Flour

Joelle" wrote in message
...
: . You can have a terrific roux in less than 15 minutes;
: which includes the browning of the flour, adding the butter
and
: letting the two marry in the pan for a few minutes.
:
:
: Okay I'm sold but I'm still a little in the dark about the
technique of
: browning flour. This is done in the oven? In the pan?
:
: Joelle
==========

In a pan on the stove top. Heat at about Medium-High. Toss the
flour in the pan and stir it around with a spatula every minute
or so.

Probably for your first time or two you may want keep a little
dish of plain flour nearby so that you can compare the color of
your dry-fry flour. It's really easy and once you start doing
your roux this way... I doubt you'll go back.

Some people put their flour on a baking sheet and brown it in the
oven. I haven't done this because I'm too lazy (another item to
wash! LOL) besides, I have to incorporate the butter into the
flour... so by dry-frying it in the skillet I'm saving a dish and
a step.

HTH,

--
Cyndi
Remove a "b" to reply"


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2012, 07:19 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joelle View Post
Okay, I know how to make a good roux - oil first, then flour, but I've come
across some recipes that instruct to "brown the flour" then add oil, and is
this just what it sounds like - throw the flour in a hot dry pan until it's
brown? Anything more to it?
Does it really make a difference to brown flour first - or can you just make a
roux?

Joelle
Hi Joelle
I was surprised to see so many replies to this , but everyone has a point. My dad always kept a quart jar of browned flour in the cabinet to use in soups and gravies. When it got low he'd get out the skillet , throw in a couple cups of flour and stir it around til it got a nice golden brown. He always said it made the gravy taste richer and better....and my dad made awesome gravy.
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
flour Allan Adler Baking 3 04-05-2004 03:18 AM
newbie, altitude cooking alia Baking 6 28-12-2003 04:52 PM
Whole wheat flour and aging A.T. Hagan Baking 3 14-11-2003 05:27 PM
baguette juergen Baking 5 04-11-2003 06:57 AM
Bretzels Karl Sigerist Sr© Baking 11 14-10-2003 02:18 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright ©2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.