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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Sugar Cured Country Ham



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 02:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
flavor") and make them buy it anyway.

I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.

Refrigeration. It's a good thing.

Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?

Do you think they LIKED all that salt?

IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 02:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,191
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:

I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
flavor") and make them buy it anyway.

I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.

Refrigeration. It's a good thing.

Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?

Do you think they LIKED all that salt?

IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!

Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)

--
Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 02:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham


"Damsel in dis Dress" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:

I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
flavor") and make them buy it anyway.

I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.

Refrigeration. It's a good thing.

Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?

Do you think they LIKED all that salt?

IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!

Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)


I gotta be me. But I would defend your right to love country ham, Smithfield
or otherwise, to the death. Just don't believe there is such a thing as
"sugar cured" country ham, e.g., country ham that is not cured primarily
with SALT.


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 03:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,301
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:52:02 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:


"Damsel in dis Dress" wrote in message
.. .
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:

I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
flavor") and make them buy it anyway.

I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.

Refrigeration. It's a good thing.

Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?

Do you think they LIKED all that salt?

IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!

Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)


I gotta be me. But I would defend your right to love country ham, Smithfield
or otherwise, to the death. Just don't believe there is such a thing as
"sugar cured" country ham, e.g., country ham that is not cured primarily
with SALT.



You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."

All sorts of country ham cure instructions he

http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/foods/458-223/458-223.html
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 03:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,191
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:52:02 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:

"Damsel in dis Dress" wrote in message
.. .
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:07:07 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:

I figured it out. It's a ruse to attract people who hate the salty crap
(even properly prepared and "sliced paper thin to release the full country
flavor") and make them buy it anyway.

I'm betting that enough of them miss the fact that is is cured with 8 cups
of salt and 2 cups of sugar that it works, too.

Refrigeration. It's a good thing.

Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?

Do you think they LIKED all that salt?

IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


I sense a little reticence. Let it out, hon. We're here for you!

Carol, who doesn't like salty food, but finds Smithfield ham strangely
and strongly addictive (Maybe it's the way Boli slices it)

I gotta be me. But I would defend your right to love country ham, Smithfield
or otherwise, to the death. Just don't believe there is such a thing as
"sugar cured" country ham, e.g., country ham that is not cured primarily
with SALT.


Naw, I hear ya. I wouldn't pay those prices for a salt lick, myself.
But it's been a nice treat the two times I've had it. I could never
go through a whole one at home, though.

Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt

--
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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 03:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham


"Boron Elgar" wrote:



You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."


Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham that
is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.



All sorts of country ham cure instructions he

http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/foods/458-223/458-223.html



  #7 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 04:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,301
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:


Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt



Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!

Boron
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 04:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 480
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:


Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt



Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!


Are they as cheap, though?
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 04:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,301
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" wrote:



You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."


Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham that
is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.


It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
used in the cure. Pretty simple.

That you do not like salty ham has nothing whatsoever to do with the
descriptors generally *used* for country ham cures. This is the
common terminology. Just as you would need to be familiar with such
terminology to understand what you were making or purchasing for other
specialized foods, it is what it is. You learn the terms or look like
an idiot when talking about the specialized food item. Your
preferences are irrelevant to the topic itself.

Boron

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 04:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,301
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:35:56 -0600, Pennyaline
wrote:

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:


Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt



Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!


Are they as cheap, though?


Yup. No club card needed and they are always in stock.

Boron
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 04:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,191
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 11:12:13 -0400, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:

Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt


Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!


ROFL!!!

Carol

--
Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 05:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham


"Boron Elgar" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 10:58:54 -0400, "cybercat"
wrote:


"Boron Elgar" wrote:



You just don't understand the terminology or it has been used
incorrectly to give you the wrong impression. A sugar cured country
ham does, indeed, have lots of salt in the cure mixture, but also
includes sugar. These hams can be cured with salt and NO sugar or with
a combo...when it's a combo, it's referred to as "sugar cured."


Sigh. I KNOW that. It's an empty, stupid term for a ****ing country ham
that
is still salty as hell. As in, salt cured. Jesus Weeping Christ.


It's a descriptive term to let a preparer or purchaser know what is
used in the cure. Pretty simple.


Right. You completely missed the context of the original post. I was simply
distinguishing between salt-cured ham and non-salt-cured ham, which I think
I called sweet ham or sugar-cured. Christine was splitting hairs to afford
herself the opportunity to correct someone.

Now **** off.


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 06:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,664
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:



Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt



Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!

Boron



Hey, I didn't know you could see through the monitor! blushing


Becca
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 07:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,301
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 12:55:19 -0500, Becca wrote:

Boron Elgar wrote:
On Wed, 15 Apr 2009 09:43:45 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:



Carol, working the leftovers of a cheap-o Cook's butt



Gotta laugh. We have a lot of cooks' butts in this group!

Boron



Hey, I didn't know you could see through the monitor! blushing


Becca


Ya gotta wear clothes when you surf the net!

Boron
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 15-04-2009, 08:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,400
Default Sugar Cured Country Ham

"cybercat" wrote:

Why return to the hams of your technologically impoverished forbears?


Because sometimes traditional equals good. Consider wine.

Do you think they LIKED all that salt?


Humans have a metabolic need for salt. Avoid it thoroughly
enough, cravings for it grow. Keep avoiding it and you get
ill. It's part of why so much modern food is over salted. So
yes I do think they liked salt. I also think they soaked hams
to reduce the salt level so to some degree I see your
aversion to salt as out of the average but not extremely rare.

IT WAS THE ONLY WAY THEY HAD TO PRESERVE MEAT.


A Thai restaurant near me offers pork jerky. I bought some
and tried it. Good but too much sugar for my tastes. Dried
so completely it could be powdered for pemmican. Almost
all commercial brands of jerky made from other critters have
too much sugar to me so this stuff at almost candied was
way past what I expect from jerky.

Drying, salting, sugaring, immersing in fat (usually comfee'
style duck or goose rendered fat) that has to be melted off
before eating. Luktefisk is fermented. Soaked in brandy.
Pickled in vinegar. Among those I hadn't had luktefisk and
I thought brandied chicken was nasty.

The oldest preservation method there is is also a way to
improve the flavor. It's a trick that's been in use for about
two million years - cooking. It's not as effective as those
other methods for longevity but it's better than just sitting
out in the wild raw.

Canned meat? In my desk is a can of Hormel beef marked
"Product of Argentina". I keep it in case I need to work
through the evening. I consider it a hard ration in the sense
that i'm not tempted to eat it under ordinary cirumstances
but I won't hestitate in an emergency. At times I've had a
can of Spam in my desk as a hard ration but I discovered I
would rather wait until the work was over and seek out a
24/7 place on the way home rather than eat it - No hot plate
at the office and I really only eat Spam hot off the griddle.
 




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