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COVER corned beef brisket with water?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 16-03-2009, 03:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 178
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be
slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them
thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is
where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 16-03-2009, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,342
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 18:43:31 +0200, ChattyCathy wrote:

On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 10:12:48 -0500, FERRANTE wrote:

I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be slow
cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them thoroughly
without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is where you
seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark


Had to ask Dad about this one - he's the 'expert' in this house regarding
corned beef ;-)

He reckons (for a 6qt slower cooker like yours) just over half a (US) pint
of water should do it (1 to 1-1/2 cups?), if you're gonna leave it on
'Low' overnight.

Be interested to see what all the other slow cooker foodies have to say
about it...

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 16-03-2009, 05:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 516
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?


"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be
slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them
thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is
where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark


I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured bottom round.
If you seared the brisket first[I recommend regardless of what you do], and
used a small amount of water, you'd be steaming. You could raise the brisket
slightly off the bottom. I'd cover tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much salt and/or
"too tough" you could just continue on and braise in the usual fashion.
The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 16-03-2009, 06:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,178
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

"ChattyCathy" wrote

I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be slow


He reckons (for a 6qt slower cooker like yours) just over half a (US) pint
of water should do it (1 to 1-1/2 cups?), if you're gonna leave it on
'Low' overnight.


Dad's right. No more than that. Less might be better!



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 17-03-2009, 12:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,847
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?


Theron wrote:

"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be
slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them
thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is
where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark


I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured bottom round.
If you seared the brisket first[I recommend regardless of what you do], and
used a small amount of water, you'd be steaming. You could raise the brisket
slightly off the bottom. I'd cover tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much salt and/or
"too tough" you could just continue on and braise in the usual fashion.
The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed


I always bake my corned beef briskets, I think they come out much better
than boiling / braising. They bake on a rack in a deep pan with a bit of
water in the bottom. Oddly enough those directions are on the package of
the brisket I currently have in the oven. I started baking them years
ago though.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-03-2009, 02:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

ChattyCathy wrote:
On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 18:43:31 +0200, ChattyCathy wrote:

On Mon, 16 Mar 2009 10:12:48 -0500, FERRANTE wrote:

I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be slow
cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them thoroughly
without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is where you
seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark

Had to ask Dad about this one - he's the 'expert' in this house regarding
corned beef ;-)

He reckons (for a 6qt slower cooker like yours) just over half a (US) pint
of water should do it (1 to 1-1/2 cups?), if you're gonna leave it on
'Low' overnight.

Be interested to see what all the other slow cooker foodies have to say
about it...

Try this way of cooking it. My wife introduced this method to me a few
years ago and I have used it ever since. Wonderful!

W

Baked corned beef

Bake: Pre heat oven to 350 Remove meat from package and place on rack
in pan fat side up. Add approximately one inch of water to bottom of
pan. Cover with contents of included spice package if desired. Cover
pan with lid or foil, bake for fifty minutes per pound or until fork
tender. With ten minutes left, uncover pan and bake at 375. When
corned beef is done remove from oven and let cool for 20 to30 minutes.
Always slice meat across grain pour juices over sliced corned beef.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 17-03-2009, 08:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 516
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?


"Pete C." wrote in message
ster.com...

Theron wrote:

"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be
slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them
thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is
where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark


I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured bottom
round.
If you seared the brisket first[I recommend regardless of what you do],
and
used a small amount of water, you'd be steaming. You could raise the
brisket
slightly off the bottom. I'd cover tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much salt
and/or
"too tough" you could just continue on and braise in the usual fashion.
The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed


I always bake my corned beef briskets, I think they come out much better
than boiling / braising. They bake on a rack in a deep pan with a bit of
water in the bottom. Oddly enough those directions are on the package of
the brisket I currently have in the oven. I started baking them years
ago though.


Thanks Pete. The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says the same
thing. I've never tried it. Do you brown the brisket first? I've been
browning when I braise and it makes quite a difference. You could also use
beer in your steaming liquid, though I doubt that it would make any
difference.

Ed,




  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-03-2009, 09:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,847
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?


Theron wrote:

"Pete C." wrote in message
ster.com...

Theron wrote:

"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets with
water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it would be
slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook them
thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure. That is
where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark

I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured bottom
round.
If you seared the brisket first[I recommend regardless of what you do],
and
used a small amount of water, you'd be steaming. You could raise the
brisket
slightly off the bottom. I'd cover tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much salt
and/or
"too tough" you could just continue on and braise in the usual fashion.
The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed


I always bake my corned beef briskets, I think they come out much better
than boiling / braising. They bake on a rack in a deep pan with a bit of
water in the bottom. Oddly enough those directions are on the package of
the brisket I currently have in the oven. I started baking them years
ago though.


Thanks Pete. The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says the same
thing. I've never tried it. Do you brown the brisket first? I've been
browning when I braise and it makes quite a difference. You could also use
beer in your steaming liquid, though I doubt that it would make any
difference.

Ed,


I just take it out of the package, put it on a rack in the pan and
sprinkle the seasoning stuff on top. The relatively long time in the
oven browns the outside just fine. Leaving the corning / pickling gook
also helps glaze it a bit. Water in the bottom of the pan mostly keeps
the drippings from burning.

I made some very tasty corned beef has this morning with a bit of the
brisket I baked last night along with the potatoes and onions I boiled
along with some cabbage (I left the cabbage out of the hash).
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 17-03-2009, 11:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,974
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

On Tue 17 Mar 2009 02:03:50p, Pete C. told us...


Theron wrote:

"Pete C." wrote in message
ster.com...

Theron wrote:

"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in
my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets
with water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it
would be slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook
them thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure.
That is where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark

I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured bottom
round. If you seared the brisket first[I recommend regardless of
what you do], and used a small amount of water, you'd be steaming.
You could raise the brisket slightly off the bottom. I'd cover
tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much salt
and/or "too tough" you could just continue on and braise in the
usual fashion. The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed

I always bake my corned beef briskets, I think they come out much
better than boiling / braising. They bake on a rack in a deep pan
with a bit of water in the bottom. Oddly enough those directions are
on the package of the brisket I currently have in the oven. I started
baking them years ago though.


Thanks Pete. The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says the
same thing. I've never tried it. Do you brown the brisket first? I've
been browning when I braise and it makes quite a difference. You could
also use beer in your steaming liquid, though I doubt that it would
make any difference.

Ed,


I just take it out of the package, put it on a rack in the pan and
sprinkle the seasoning stuff on top. The relatively long time in the
oven browns the outside just fine. Leaving the corning / pickling gook
also helps glaze it a bit. Water in the bottom of the pan mostly keeps
the drippings from burning.

I made some very tasty corned beef has this morning with a bit of the
brisket I baked last night along with the potatoes and onions I boiled
along with some cabbage (I left the cabbage out of the hash).


IMO, how you cook corned beef is directly releated on how you plan to use
it. I have roasted it with great success and enjoyed it. However, if I
want a boiled corned beef and cabbage dinner, I want sufficient liquid to
boil the potatoes, carrots, onions, cabbage, and turnips. Roasting simply
doesn't provide for that. Of course, the vegetables could be cooked
separately, but would not be infused with the flavor from the cooking
liquid of the corned beef.

I doubt there's any really bad way to cook corned beef. It just depends on
what you want. A couple of times when I roasted it, near the end of
cooking I coated it liberally with a mixture of brown sugar and mustard to
give it a good spicy/sweet glaze.

--
Wayne Boatwright

"One man's meat is another man's poison"
- Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 18-03-2009, 02:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,847
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?


Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Tue 17 Mar 2009 02:03:50p, Pete C. told us...


Theron wrote:

"Pete C." wrote in message
ster.com...

Theron wrote:

"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight in
my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the briskets
with water and not use that much? I was thinking that since it
would be slow cooking all night that the steam (heat) would cook
them thoroughly without needing so much water, but I am not sure.
That is where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark

I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured bottom
round. If you seared the brisket first[I recommend regardless of
what you do], and used a small amount of water, you'd be steaming.
You could raise the brisket slightly off the bottom. I'd cover
tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much salt
and/or "too tough" you could just continue on and braise in the
usual fashion. The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed

I always bake my corned beef briskets, I think they come out much
better than boiling / braising. They bake on a rack in a deep pan
with a bit of water in the bottom. Oddly enough those directions are
on the package of the brisket I currently have in the oven. I started
baking them years ago though.

Thanks Pete. The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says the
same thing. I've never tried it. Do you brown the brisket first? I've
been browning when I braise and it makes quite a difference. You could
also use beer in your steaming liquid, though I doubt that it would
make any difference.

Ed,


I just take it out of the package, put it on a rack in the pan and
sprinkle the seasoning stuff on top. The relatively long time in the
oven browns the outside just fine. Leaving the corning / pickling gook
also helps glaze it a bit. Water in the bottom of the pan mostly keeps
the drippings from burning.

I made some very tasty corned beef has this morning with a bit of the
brisket I baked last night along with the potatoes and onions I boiled
along with some cabbage (I left the cabbage out of the hash).


IMO, how you cook corned beef is directly releated on how you plan to use
it. I have roasted it with great success and enjoyed it. However, if I
want a boiled corned beef and cabbage dinner, I want sufficient liquid to
boil the potatoes, carrots, onions, cabbage, and turnips. Roasting simply
doesn't provide for that.


Of course, the vegetables could be cooked
separately, but would not be infused with the flavor from the cooking
liquid of the corned beef.


If you want the flavor in the separate vegetables, just add some
pickling spice mix to the water.


I doubt there's any really bad way to cook corned beef. It just depends on
what you want. A couple of times when I roasted it, near the end of
cooking I coated it liberally with a mixture of brown sugar and mustard to
give it a good spicy/sweet glaze.

--
Wayne Boatwright

"One man's meat is another man's poison"
- Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 18-03-2009, 02:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,974
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

On Tue 17 Mar 2009 07:26:24p, Pete C. told us...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Tue 17 Mar 2009 02:03:50p, Pete C. told us...


Theron wrote:

"Pete C." wrote in message
ster.com...

Theron wrote:

"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
I am going to start cooking my two corned beef briskets tonight
in my
new crock pot and I have a question: should I cover the
briskets with water and not use that much? I was thinking that
since it would be slow cooking all night that the steam (heat)
would cook them thoroughly without needing so much water, but I
am not sure. That is where you seasoned cooks come in.

How much water is needed?

Thanks,
Mark

I've been wondering about baking, or steaming a mildly cured
bottom round. If you seared the brisket first[I recommend
regardless of what you do], and used a small amount of water,
you'd be steaming. You could raise the brisket slightly off the
bottom. I'd cover tightly.

I just thought. If you did this and the end result was too much
salt and/or "too tough" you could just continue on and braise in
the usual fashion. The best St. Patrick's day to you,
Ed

I always bake my corned beef briskets, I think they come out much
better than boiling / braising. They bake on a rack in a deep pan
with a bit of water in the bottom. Oddly enough those directions
are on the package of the brisket I currently have in the oven. I
started baking them years ago though.

Thanks Pete. The Safeway corned beef package I'm about to cook says
the same thing. I've never tried it. Do you brown the brisket first?
I've been browning when I braise and it makes quite a difference.
You could also use beer in your steaming liquid, though I doubt that
it would make any difference.

Ed,

I just take it out of the package, put it on a rack in the pan and
sprinkle the seasoning stuff on top. The relatively long time in the
oven browns the outside just fine. Leaving the corning / pickling
gook also helps glaze it a bit. Water in the bottom of the pan mostly
keeps the drippings from burning.

I made some very tasty corned beef has this morning with a bit of the
brisket I baked last night along with the potatoes and onions I
boiled along with some cabbage (I left the cabbage out of the hash).


IMO, how you cook corned beef is directly releated on how you plan to
use it. I have roasted it with great success and enjoyed it. However,
if I want a boiled corned beef and cabbage dinner, I want sufficient
liquid to boil the potatoes, carrots, onions, cabbage, and turnips.
Roasting simply doesn't provide for that.


Of course, the vegetables could be cooked
separately, but would not be infused with the flavor from the cooking
liquid of the corned beef.


If you want the flavor in the separate vegetables, just add some
pickling spice mix to the water.


It would still be missing the flavor of the meat and a bit of fat dispersed
in the liquid. Just not the same.

Don't get me wrong, I do like roasted corned beef, but if I'm making a full
boiled dinner of corned beef and cabbage and other root vegetables, I would
never roast the meat. Roasted corned beef is an entirely different meal.

I doubt there's any really bad way to cook corned beef. It just
depends on what you want. A couple of times when I roasted it, near
the end of cooking I coated it liberally with a mixture of brown sugar
and mustard to give it a good spicy/sweet glaze.

--
Wayne Boatwright

"One man's meat is another man's poison" - Oswald Dykes, English
writer, 1709.





--
Wayne Boatwright

"One man's meat is another man's poison"
- Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 18-03-2009, 05:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48,675
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

On Tue, 17 Mar 2009 23:41:23 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
wrote:

I doubt there's any really bad way to cook corned beef. It just depends on
what you want. A couple of times when I roasted it, near the end of
cooking I coated it liberally with a mixture of brown sugar and mustard to
give it a good spicy/sweet glaze.


I've always been partial to starting it off by boiling (gets rid of
excess salt too) and finishing it off in the oven with that yummy
brown sugar and mustard (French's yellow is what I decided was best)
glaze.


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 18-03-2009, 09:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

My corned beef dinner turned out great! I slow cooked both briskets
all night in my new slow cooker and then removed them the next
morning. I let them cool and then wrapped them in foil and placed them
in the fridge. I then added the potatoes, carrots, and onions to the
broth and cooked for several hours. I then sliced the meat and added
it back to the broth and it was so good. I also used the Pensky's
Corned Beef Spices.

The only thing I regret is inviting friends over to eat. And they did!
I have no left over's for tonight ;( I may make it again this weekend!

Mark
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 19-03-2009, 12:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,262
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?


"FERRANTE" wrote

The only thing I regret is inviting friends over to eat. And they did!
I have no left over's for tonight ;( I may make it again this weekend!

Mark


Now you know why I make 20 pounds.


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 19-03-2009, 02:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,194
Default COVER corned beef brisket with water?

FERRANTE wrote in
:

My corned beef dinner turned out great! I slow cooked both
briskets all night in my new slow cooker and then removed them
the next morning. I let them cool and then wrapped them in
foil and placed them in the fridge. I then added the
potatoes, carrots, and onions to the broth and cooked for
several hours. I then sliced the meat and added it back to the
broth and it was so good. I also used the Pensky's Corned Beef
Spices.

The only thing I regret is inviting friends over to eat. And
they did! I have no left over's for tonight ;( I may make it
again this weekend!

Mark


I just got back from the grocery store with 8#'s for this weekends
meals. Love corned beef.

Glad you are enjoying your new cooker. They are great. I have 4
of various sizes/shapes.
 




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