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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 12:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 327
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 12:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Sky
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Posts: 2,348
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

amandaF wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


Er, I don't think they're the same. There's that addage about not
cooking with stuff one wouldn't drink. If it can't be drunk, then
perhaps it should be chucked? Stick with a good drinking wine, and the
dish will be fine.

Sky

--
Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 12:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "


"amandaF" wrote in message
...
What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


Cooking wine is SALTED.

Do not use.

Dimitri

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 540
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

Sky wrote:
amandaF wrote:
What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


Er, I don't think they're the same. There's that addage about not
cooking with stuff one wouldn't drink. If it can't be drunk, then
perhaps it should be chucked? Stick with a good drinking wine, and the
dish will be fine.

Sky

Also, the "cooking wines" are often salted.
Perhaps to make them less palatable for abuse, but still usable for
cooking (if you re3duce salt in the rest of the recipe.)
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 01:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 16,998
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

amandaF wrote:
What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


Aieee! Cooking wine is dregs from the bottom of a barrel of wine no one
would drink with lots of salt added. Do not cook with (or drink!) "cooking
wine". The rule is very basic: don't cook with wine you wouldn't drink.
Sherry isn't the same as some generic "cooking wine", either. If you don't
drink wine, fine. You don't have to drink wine to cook with it. But ask
someone at the store about an inexpensive wine that isn't "cooking wine";
drinkable wine. They'll recommend something that isn't "cooking wine".

Jill

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 02:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
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Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

On Oct 15, 4:19*pm, amandaF wrote:
What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


Okay, I'm done with you. I've given you the benefit of the doubt
through a lot of completely ignorant posts. There's nothing wrong
with ignorance, it just means somebody hasn't learned someething yet.
But your record of posts from a standpoint of "there's nothing too
obvious for me to pretend to ask about" has ultimately worn too thin.
No one who is interested enough in food to read this group could be
ignorant of the full range of things you have pretended ignorance
about. Give it up. Or make up another name. -aem
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 05:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 220
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 16:19:30 -0700 (PDT), amandaF
wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"?


Salt. Buy a cheap dry sherry to cook with... Gallo is fine.

Are they the same?


No.




--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 05:34 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,234
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

On Wed 15 Oct 2008 09:25:53p, sf told us...

On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 16:19:30 -0700 (PDT), amandaF
wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"?


Salt. Buy a cheap dry sherry to cook with... Gallo is fine.

Are they the same?


No.


Cooking sherry is vile. One taste would convince you. :-) Barbara's
right. Buy an inexpensive drinking sherry to cook with.

Personally, I prefer substituting Sercial Madeira for sherry in most
recipes. It's a rather dry madeira and perfect for cooking. For sipping,
I prefer a Malmsey Madeira. It is sweeter and has a rather complex flavor.

This substitution is strictly a matter of personal taste.

--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)

*******************************************
Date: Wednesday, 10(X)/15(XV)/08(MMVIII)
*******************************************
Countdown till Veteran's Day
3wks 5dys 2hrs 32mins
*******************************************
#1 BORG Hit Parade: We all sleep in a
single subroutine
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 05:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

In article
,
amandaF wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


No.

I've seen it stated more than one:

"Never cook with something you are not willing to drink from a glass".

Trust me. You don't want to drink "cooking sherry" as a beverage.
There is not, and never will be, any in my pantry.
--
Peace! Om

"He who has the gold makes the rules"
--Om

"He who has the guns can get the gold."
-- Steve Rothstein
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 05:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 24,846
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 15 Oct 2008 09:25:53p, sf told us...

On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 16:19:30 -0700 (PDT), amandaF
wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"?


Salt. Buy a cheap dry sherry to cook with... Gallo is fine.

Are they the same?


No.


Cooking sherry is vile. One taste would convince you. :-) Barbara's
right. Buy an inexpensive drinking sherry to cook with.

Personally, I prefer substituting Sercial Madeira for sherry in most
recipes. It's a rather dry madeira and perfect for cooking. For sipping,
I prefer a Malmsey Madeira. It is sweeter and has a rather complex flavor.

This substitution is strictly a matter of personal taste.


I've not tried Madeira for cooking.
What recipes do you routinely use it in? I mostly use dryer red or
white wines, or port for dessert dishes.
--
Peace! Om

"He who has the gold makes the rules"
--Om

"He who has the guns can get the gold."
-- Steve Rothstein
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 06:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,234
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

On Thu 16 Oct 2008 09:34:47a, Omelet told us...

In article ,
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 15 Oct 2008 09:25:53p, sf told us...

On Wed, 15 Oct 2008 16:19:30 -0700 (PDT), amandaF
wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking
wine (Sherry)"?

Salt. Buy a cheap dry sherry to cook with... Gallo is fine.

Are they the same?

No.


Cooking sherry is vile. One taste would convince you. :-) Barbara's
right. Buy an inexpensive drinking sherry to cook with.

Personally, I prefer substituting Sercial Madeira for sherry in most
recipes. It's a rather dry madeira and perfect for cooking. For
sipping, I prefer a Malmsey Madeira. It is sweeter and has a rather
complex flavor.

This substitution is strictly a matter of personal taste.


I've not tried Madeira for cooking.
What recipes do you routinely use it in? I mostly use dryer red or
white wines, or port for dessert dishes.


Generally, I use it in recipe that calls for sherry, but Maderia specific
dishes include those with chicken, pork, or beef. Chicken in a Madeira
sauce that includes citrus rind and raisins, pork medallions with a Madeira
and butter sauce, filet mignon with a mushroom and Madeira sauce. There
are many possibiliites.

--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)

*******************************************
Date: Thursday, 10(X)/16(XVI)/08(MMVIII)
*******************************************
Countdown till Veteran's Day
3wks 4dys 13hrs 26mins
*******************************************
It's a damned poor mind that can only
think of one way to spell a word.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 16-10-2008, 06:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 275
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

Always use The Real Thing, NEVER any "cooking wine". They put tons of
salt in it.

Sherry wine vinager is mighty tasty, too.

LassChance

  #13 (permalink)  
Old 17-10-2008, 12:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 467
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

"aem" wrote in message
...

Okay, I'm done with you. I've given you the benefit of the doubt
through a lot of completely ignorant posts. There's nothing wrong
with ignorance, it just means somebody hasn't learned someething yet.
But your record of posts from a standpoint of "there's nothing too
obvious for me to pretend to ask about" has ultimately worn too thin.
No one who is interested enough in food to read this group could be
ignorant of the full range of things you have pretended ignorance
about. Give it up. Or make up another name. -aem

=============================================

There's someone on another group I read who does the same thing, except they
crosspost their silly questions. And, they *do* change their name, but the
questions are all basically the same, and easy to pick out that it's the
same person. (the groups they crosspost to are always the same).

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 17-10-2008, 02:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 327
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

On Oct 15, 6:22 pm, aem wrote:
On Oct 15, 4:19 pm, amandaF wrote:

What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


Okay, I'm done with you. I've given you the benefit of the doubt
through a lot of completely ignorant posts. There's nothing wrong
with ignorance, it just means somebody hasn't learned someething yet.
But your record of posts from a standpoint of "there's nothing too
obvious for me to pretend to ask about" has ultimately worn too thin.
No one who is interested enough in food to read this group could be
ignorant of the full range of things you have pretended ignorance
about. Give it up. Or make up another name. -aem


Waht? Obviously, you have no fxxx'n clue that I grew up having nothing
to dow ith kitchen work, then came to US for grad studies during which
I learned to make 3or 4 dishes to live on - beef curry, spaghetti
(buying the sauce), stir-fry noodle (no recipe; my own creation) and
so actually, it's only 3. Half the time I ate out or bought food (like
pizza and fried chicken; I was young and could handle the grease.
Then, when I moved to a new city, I met some people from my country
and learned some cooking idea. At this time, I also went to Indian
grocery stores to learn about the spices (literally learning like
school work) and Asian grocery stores. Then, I stared another grad
program and so I couldn't really try all that cooking idea I learned
and I forgot them all. Then I graduated and moved to this city in CA,
and was exposed to a lot of things - I learned about the best brand of
fish sauce fro m this news group despite being form SE Asia - and so
I know some names but as far as cooking skills, first of all, there is
just one person in my household. Secondly, I need HIGH protein diet.
Third, it's a waste of time to try cooking different dish when one
has to live on high protein diet and with age, does not feel well
eating certain things I used to eat. So, go ahead. Judge others by
yourself. Nothing new.

And bye bye.
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 17-10-2008, 02:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 327
Default Dry sherry versus "cooking wine (sherry) "

On Oct 16, 9:32 am, Omelet wrote:
In article
,

amandaF wrote:
What is the difference between dry sherry versus Reese's "Cooking wine
(Sherry)"? Are they the same?


No.

I've seen it stated more than one:

"Never cook with something you are not willing to drink from a glass".


I don't know anything about alcohol: Beer, wine, etc. because I stay
away from alcohol. No smoking, no pot, no weed, no any drug either.
My brain has never been abused by any drug.


Trust me. You don't want to drink "cooking sherry" as a beverage.
There is not, and never will be, any in my pantry.
--
Peace! Om

"He who has the gold makes the rules"
--Om

"He who has the guns can get the gold."
-- Steve Rothstein


 




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