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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

KFC 9.99 bucket



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 04:54 AM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 213
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 07:47 AM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


Healthwise, you would do much better to bake or roast your
chicken for better flavor, reduced fat and carbs.

We pay a high price for our highly processed food in the
name of saving time and a few cents.

-- larry/dallas
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 08:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,012
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

"larry" ha scritto nel messaggio
...
James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket prices?


Healthwise, you would do much better to bake or roast your chicken for
better flavor, reduced fat and carbs.

We pay a high price for our highly processed food in the name of saving
time and a few cents.

-- larry/dallas


Home fried chicken once in a while is my friend. I don't understand how OP
expects anyone to know how much that bucket weighs, let alone how much it
weighed before cooking. I am positive the information isn't on the package.
I wouldn't even know which pieces were in it, so if I copy it, do I cook the
wings and back or not?


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 10:57 AM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,799
Default KFC 9.99 bucket


"James" wrote in message
...
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


Cost is about the same as if you compared it to the chicken dinner at a nice
restaurant for $19 a plate. What is the point? You pay for convenience.
Whole chicken is 99 a pound regularly.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,957
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


[cross-posting snipped]

About $4 USD for a whole chicken. Pennies for the oil and breading/batter
for frying. KFC is no bargain and doesn't even taste good.

Jill

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:16 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,957
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
"James" wrote in message
...
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


Cost is about the same as if you compared it to the chicken dinner at
a nice restaurant for $19 a plate. What is the point? You pay for
convenience. Whole chicken is 99 a pound regularly.



You must admit 99 cents a pound sounds rather deceptive since I've never
actually seen a 1 lb. chicken for sale Okay, cornish hens weigh a pound
or so but they aren't nearly as inexpensive as a whole chicken, poundage
wise. Publix has chicken leg quarters on sale for 59 cents/lb right now.
That's the cheapest I've seen them in a long time.

Jill

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:20 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,653
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

jmcquown wrote:

You must admit 99 cents a pound sounds rather deceptive since I've
never actually seen a 1 lb. chicken for sale Okay, cornish hens
weigh a pound or so but they aren't nearly as inexpensive as a whole
chicken, poundage wise. Publix has chicken leg quarters on sale for
59 cents/lb right now. That's the cheapest I've seen them in a long
time.


That would totally work for me, those are my picks from the
KFC bucket of chicken. Not that I've had a bucket since I was
in my early 20s. I could do real damage to a bucket of fried
chicken in those days. That was before they messed with the
brand.

nancy


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,965
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

jmcquown wrote:
James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


[cross-posting snipped]

About $4 USD for a whole chicken. Pennies for the oil and
breading/batter for frying. KFC is no bargain and doesn't even taste
good.
Jill


$4? Wow, down here, we usually pay about $7 for a whole chicken - not cut
up, which is fine. Allan's great at (this sounds bad!) whacking up a
chicken to fry. :~) I get squeamish. I can't do it.

We usually just cut up the chicken, put it in cornmeal mix with garlic and
pepper, shake, and fry. Still WAY cheaper than KFC and cheaper than the
grocery store deli fried chicken, too.

And, yep, Jill, KFC doesn't even taste good.

kili


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:43 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,965
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

Nancy Young wrote:
jmcquown wrote:

You must admit 99 cents a pound sounds rather deceptive since I've
never actually seen a 1 lb. chicken for sale Okay, cornish hens
weigh a pound or so but they aren't nearly as inexpensive as a whole
chicken, poundage wise. Publix has chicken leg quarters on sale for
59 cents/lb right now. That's the cheapest I've seen them in a long
time.


That would totally work for me, those are my picks from the
KFC bucket of chicken. Not that I've had a bucket since I was
in my early 20s. I could do real damage to a bucket of fried
chicken in those days. That was before they messed with the
brand.

nancy


I had a friend whose boyfriend was a manager at a KFC. He said they don't
even use 11 herbs and spices. I'm trying to remember, here, um, he said
powdered milk (or buttermilk), oil, powdered egg, garlic, water, salt &
pepper. That was it. Big secret, huh?

kili


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,957
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

kilikini wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


[cross-posting snipped]

About $4 USD for a whole chicken. Pennies for the oil and
breading/batter for frying. KFC is no bargain and doesn't even taste
good.


$4? Wow, down here, we usually pay about $7 for a whole chicken -
not cut up, which is fine. Allan's great at (this sounds bad!)
whacking up a chicken to fry. :~) I get squeamish. I can't do it.

I was erring on the side of conservative pricing. It's been a while since I
bought a whole chicken. I did buy a cut up chicken when I made chicken &
dumplings a month or so ago; it was $5 and change. Oh, and Mom had us pick
up a rotisserie chicken at the grocery store for dinner back in June; that
was only $5.

And, yep, Jill, KFC doesn't even taste good.

It's been years since I bought KFC. That little store back home makes
better fried chicken than they do

Jill

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 01:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 389
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

On Thu, 9 Oct 2008 08:41:09 -0400, "kilikini"
wrote:

jmcquown wrote:
James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


[cross-posting snipped]

About $4 USD for a whole chicken. Pennies for the oil and
breading/batter for frying. KFC is no bargain and doesn't even taste
good.
Jill


$4? Wow, down here, we usually pay about $7 for a whole chicken - not cut
up, which is fine. Allan's great at (this sounds bad!) whacking up a
chicken to fry. :~) I get squeamish. I can't do it.

We usually just cut up the chicken, put it in cornmeal mix with garlic and
pepper, shake, and fry. Still WAY cheaper than KFC and cheaper than the
grocery store deli fried chicken, too.

And, yep, Jill, KFC doesn't even taste good.

The cheapest you usually see whole chicken here is a buck a pound. I
usually make fried chicken tenders instead because Albertsons sells
them for a buck fifty to two dollars (breasts are the same price but I
like tenders better because you don't have to mess with them). When DH
craves fried chicken I go and buy a pound, crumb them up with panko
crumbs, and make some with no icky salt or msg to spoil it.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 02:02 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living,rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

On Oct 9, 2:47*am, larry wrote:
James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? *At sale prices? *Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


Healthwise, you would do much better to bake or roast your
chicken for better flavor, reduced fat and carbs.


That's not the question being asked.


We pay a high price for our highly processed food in the
name of saving time and a few cents.


Yes, we know.

Some of us also like KFC every now and then and do not need preached
to everytime a question about fast food is brought up.

Would you like to be told about veganism or the cruelty of poultry
processing plants every time you mention roasting chicken? How buying
chicken supports illegal aliens working in the plants? Probably not.
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 03:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,965
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

Kajikit wrote:
On Thu, 9 Oct 2008 08:41:09 -0400, "kilikini"
wrote:

The cheapest you usually see whole chicken here is a buck a pound. I
usually make fried chicken tenders instead because Albertsons sells
them for a buck fifty to two dollars (breasts are the same price but I
like tenders better because you don't have to mess with them). When DH
craves fried chicken I go and buy a pound, crumb them up with panko
crumbs, and make some with no icky salt or msg to spoil it.


I've never tried to fry chicken with panko, yet, and unfortunately I'm all
out of it. Sometime this next week if the hubby gets a day off, I want to
take the trek to Tampa and restock my Asian items. (I need a *lot* of
stuff, too.) Anyway, I would love chicken fried in panko rather than the
cornmeal we usually use! Typically I only Panko on fish. Chicken would be
a nice change and I have chicken breasts in the freezer, too. Maybe I can
think of a good stuffed chicken breast idea with a crispy panko crust.
Hmmmmmm.

(Can you hear the wheels turning?)

kili


  #14 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 03:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 17,957
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

kilikini wrote:
On Thu, 9 Oct 2008 08:41:09 -0400, "kilikini"
wrote:

Typically I only Panko on fish.

kili



When did "Panko" become a verb? G

Jill
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 09-10-2008, 04:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,830
Default KFC 9.99 bucket

On Thu, 9 Oct 2008 08:41:09 -0400, "kilikini"
wrote:

jmcquown wrote:
James wrote:
How much would the raw chicken cost you at regular supermarket
prices? At sale prices? Assume you cook regularly and have all the
other stuff necessary for fried chicken so their cost is minor.


[cross-posting snipped]

About $4 USD for a whole chicken. Pennies for the oil and
breading/batter for frying. KFC is no bargain and doesn't even taste
good.
Jill


$4? Wow, down here, we usually pay about $7 for a whole chicken - not cut
up, which is fine.


How big is the chicken? According to Tyson a broiler-fryer is between
3 1/2 - 4 pounds. A roaster is 5-8 pounds. I looked at the current
flyers and I see Perdue roasters for .89 a pound. Another place has
leg quarters for .69 and bone in breasts for .79 a pound.

I also see New york strips for 4.99 at a few different places. You
guys really pay a lot for food down there compared to the midwest.

Lou
 




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