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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Skimming grease from gravy?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 03:04 AM
Gene
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?

I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?



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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 03:07 AM
Dave
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Gene" wrote in message
news | I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
| gravy...what is it?
|
Chill it, then peel off the fat.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 06:38 AM
Tony
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?

Float a candle wick in the grease, light it, and enjoy an elegant
candlelight dinner.
The next day use the grease-free gravy for something else.

Tony

"Gene" wrote in message
news
I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?





  #4 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 09:52 AM
Nicbrown37
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?

Chill it, then peel off the fat.

That's what I just did in fact. I poured all the roast juices in a pan and
froze it. When it thaws somewhat, I'll peel all that heart clogging grease off
the top and use what's left -thicken it with flour for gravy.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 12:38 PM
FMathies
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?


I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?



Pour into a cup and put a few ice cubes on top. Fat jells in a few minutes.
Saves time rather than putting in freezers. When fat is jelled, skim off
excess fat and ice cubes. I hope this helps.

Florence
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 06:27 PM
Dimitri
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Gene" wrote in message
news
I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?

Don't skim it. That is a loosing battle.

Use a defatting cup.


Dimitri


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 07:23 PM
Dave Smith
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?

Gene wrote:

I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?


Let it sit for a little while and the grease should float to the top. If
the gravy is think enough that you can make a little well in it, even
better. For the last little bits, lay a paper towel over the top of it
and that will soak up some grease.


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 27-10-2003, 11:17 PM
Sam D.
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Dimitri" wrote in message
om...

"Gene" wrote in message
news
I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?


Don't skim it. That is a loosing battle.

Use a defatting cup.

I presume you mean the same thing that's also referred to as a gravy
separator which is a major time saver. I've used the other methods mentioned
here but this is by far the best way, particularly if you want to make gravy
to accompany the meat you've just cooked.


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 28-10-2003, 03:15 PM
Dimitri
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Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Sam D." wrote in message
...

"Dimitri" wrote in message
om...

"Gene" wrote in message
news
I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?


Don't skim it. That is a loosing battle.

Use a defatting cup.


I presume you mean the same thing that's also referred to as a gravy
separator which is a major time saver. I've used the other methods
mentioned
here but this is by far the best way, particularly if you want to make

gravy
to accompany the meat you've just cooked.


I am sure they're one and the same. Nothing more than a measuring cup with a
spout, only the base of the spout is at the bottom of the cup thereby
keeping the fat on the top.

Dimitri


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 29-10-2003, 03:24 PM
Gigi
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Posts: n/a
Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Dimitri" wrote in message
om...

"Sam D." wrote in message
...

"Dimitri" wrote in message
om...

"Gene" wrote in message
news I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from the
gravy...what is it?

Don't skim it. That is a loosing battle.

Use a defatting cup.


I presume you mean the same thing that's also referred to as a gravy
separator which is a major time saver. I've used the other methods

mentioned
here but this is by far the best way, particularly if you want to make

gravy
to accompany the meat you've just cooked.


I am sure they're one and the same. Nothing more than a measuring cup with a
spout, only the base of the spout is at the bottom of the cup thereby
keeping the fat on the top.

Dimitri

I have one of these cups but I've never been successful at using it. It seems
like when I tip it up to pour, the grease just comes with the good stuff. Would
someone explain the proper use of this piece of equipment? I know I must be
doing something wrong but I've never seen it used. I'm thinking maybe I just
don't tip it far enough but pouring hot stock plus fat is not conducive to much
experimentation. Thanks for any instructions.


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 29-10-2003, 04:40 PM
what?
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Gigi" itchyfeet(no wrote in message
ink.net...

"Dimitri" wrote in message
om...

"Sam D." wrote in message
...

"Dimitri" wrote in message
om...

"Gene" wrote in message
news I know there's an easy trick to skimming the floating grease from

the
gravy...what is it?

Don't skim it. That is a loosing battle.

Use a defatting cup.

I presume you mean the same thing that's also referred to as a gravy
separator which is a major time saver. I've used the other methods

mentioned
here but this is by far the best way, particularly if you want to make

gravy
to accompany the meat you've just cooked.


I am sure they're one and the same. Nothing more than a measuring cup

with a
spout, only the base of the spout is at the bottom of the cup thereby
keeping the fat on the top.

Dimitri

I have one of these cups but I've never been successful at using it. It

seems
like when I tip it up to pour, the grease just comes with the good stuff.

Would
someone explain the proper use of this piece of equipment? I know I must

be
doing something wrong but I've never seen it used. I'm thinking maybe I

just
don't tip it far enough but pouring hot stock plus fat is not conducive to

much
experimentation. Thanks for any instructions.



Skim off most of the fat, then add some lecithin to emulsify the fat with
the gravy - the fat won't rise to the surface then.

  #12 (permalink)  
Old 29-10-2003, 09:17 PM
Dimitri
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Gigi" itchyfeet(no wrote in message news:sYQnb.7098$

snip

I am sure they're one and the same. Nothing more than a measuring cup

with a
spout, only the base of the spout is at the bottom of the cup thereby
keeping the fat on the top.

Dimitri

I have one of these cups but I've never been successful at using it. It

seems
like when I tip it up to pour, the grease just comes with the good stuff.

Would
someone explain the proper use of this piece of equipment? I know I must

be
doing something wrong but I've never seen it used. I'm thinking maybe I

just
don't tip it far enough but pouring hot stock plus fat is not conducive to

much
experimentation. Thanks for any instructions.


In my experience the thinner the liquid the better the cup works. Therefore
I usually remove as much fat as possible before thickening the liquid. The
other point is the very tip of the spout will have some fat. I just discard
the tablespoon or so. Finally the longer you let the liquid set in the cup
the more fat will come to the top.


Dimitri


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 30-10-2003, 12:42 PM
Stark Raven
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Skimming grease from gravy?

In article . net, Gigi
wrote:

I have one of these cups but I've never been successful at using it. It seems
like when I tip it up to pour, the grease just comes with the good stuff.
Would
someone explain the proper use of this piece of equipment? I know I must be
doing something wrong but I've never seen it used. I'm thinking maybe I just
don't tip it far enough but pouring hot stock plus fat is not conducive to much
experimentation. Thanks for any instructions.


I've had same problems with the separation cups when there wasn't
enough total liquid to allow the spout to work. If you have the time,
try chilling the cup to help separation; if you have lots of time to
chill you don't need the cup.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 30-10-2003, 03:20 PM
Gigi
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Skimming grease from gravy?


"Dimitri" wrote in message
. ..

"Gigi" itchyfeet(no wrote in message news:sYQnb.7098$

snip

I am sure they're one and the same. Nothing more than a measuring cup

with a
spout, only the base of the spout is at the bottom of the cup thereby
keeping the fat on the top.

Dimitri

I have one of these cups but I've never been successful at using it. It

seems like when I tip it up to pour, the grease just comes with the good

stuff.
Would someone explain the proper use of this piece of equipment?


In my experience the thinner the liquid the better the cup works. Therefore
I usually remove as much fat as possible before thickening the liquid. The
other point is the very tip of the spout will have some fat. I just discard
the tablespoon or so. Finally the longer you let the liquid set in the cup
the more fat will come to the top.


Dimitri


Thanks, Dimitri, I've always just poured all the liquid into the cup so I'll try
skimming as much of the fat as I can and then try the cup. Thanksgiving and
turkey gravy are on the horizon so I'd really like to get this da.. cup to work.
Gigi


  #15 (permalink)  
Old 30-10-2003, 07:30 PM
[email protected]
Usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Skimming grease from gravy?

Stark Raven wrote:

In article . net, Gigi
wrote:

I have one of these cups but I've never been successful at using it. It seems
like when I tip it up to pour, the grease just comes with the good stuff.
Would
someone explain the proper use of this piece of equipment? I know I must be
doing something wrong but I've never seen it used. I'm thinking maybe I just
don't tip it far enough but pouring hot stock plus fat is not conducive to much
experimentation. Thanks for any instructions.


I've had same problems with the separation cups when there wasn't
enough total liquid to allow the spout to work. If you have the time,
try chilling the cup to help separation; if you have lots of time to
chill you don't need the cup.


Place the liquid in a cup wider than a ladle. Let the liquid cool to near room
temperature. Place some ice cubes in the ladle and float it on top of the
liquid. After a short time the fat will solidify and stick to the bottom of
the ladle. Remove from the ladle under warm running water. Repeat until
needed.

Works like a charm.

Bert
 




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