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Tumeric vs. Turmeric



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 09:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 173
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.

Here's a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.

Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?

I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 12:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 9,315
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

On Jun 30, 4:04�am, "
wrote:
A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.

Here's a link: �http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.

Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?

I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.


It's spelled "turmeric" but both pronunciations are equally correct...
but eliding the first "r" is far more common.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/turmeric



  #3 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 01:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,393
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

wrote:
A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.

Here's a link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.

Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?

I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.



Even your header made me shudder, Michael. I agree.

--
Jean B.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 01:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,393
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

wrote:

Ooops. Saw Michael's name above. Janos. (?) Sorry.
--
Jean B.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 02:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,208
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

wrote on Mon, 30 Jun 2008 01:04:22 -0700
(PDT):

Here's a link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking
of tumors.


Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and
critics learn the proper names of their ingredients?


While you are correct, it's a pretty common misspelling. Even if Google
says "Did you mean turmeric", there were 317,000 hits, altho' there were
3,140,000 for "turmeric". Those who spell it tumeric probably are those
who pronounce it "too....".

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

E-mail, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 02:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,315
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

On Jun 30, 9:05�am, "James Silverton"
wrote:
�wrote �on Mon, 30 Jun 2008 01:04:22 -0700
(PDT):

Here's a link: �http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric
Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking
of tumors.
Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and
critics learn the proper names of their ingredients?


While you are correct, it's a pretty common misspelling. Even if Google
says "Did you mean turmeric", there were 317,000 hits, altho' there were
3,140,000 for "turmeric". Those who spell it tumeric probably are those
who pronounce it "too....".


WTF are you babbling about???



  #7 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 03:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 881
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric


wrote in message
...
A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.

Here's a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.

Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?

I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.


You're right.

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 04:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,315
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

On Jun 30, 10:56�am, "Janet" wrote:
wrote in message

...

A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.


Here's a link: �http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric


Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.


Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?


I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.


You're right.


Yet another pinhead can't use a dictionary.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 05:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 62
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

"Janet" wrote in news:6csag2F3hevlnU1
@mid.individual.net:

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


Koo-men, as it is from the Spanish, comino, through the French cumin.
Nowhere in those previous conditions was the first syllable pronounced
"kyu-".

Pronouncing it "kyu-" means you are saying the letter "u" ("yoo") as you
sound it in English, which is fine for English but not for words derived
from non-English sources. This also implies that first contact was with
a written word, hence the error.

Or you could avoid that and pronounce it "jira" (as in jeera, not jyra)
which is the Indian word.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumin

What you (collectively) should decide is whether you will habitually
impose English pronunciation on words of foreign origin or adopt a
forever shifting reality. I opt for the latter but as English is not my
father tongue I am here much like the residents of Washington DC, aware
of the problem, contributing to the debate, but likely not allowed to
vote.

For what it's worth, French imposes French pronunciation so that "cumin"
sounds like "cul-main" (or arse-hand ;-) ). But then again French has
clearly defined rules.

Further to this:

Do you say "sil-antro" or "chil-antro"?

Do you write " la mode" (the proper way) or "ala/alla mode" (as though
it was Italian)?

Do you say Eye-rak or Eerk (with emphasis on the last syllable)? Guess
which one is correct (hint: it's not the way you would read it).

NOTICE: The comments and questions are addressed to all who read this and
who are unilingual anglophones, in any case where the author has used the
term "you". This is not intended to be read as being directed at a
single individual. Let's see how many people read this far ;-)
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 05:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,547
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

In article ,
"Janet" wrote:

wrote in message
...
A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.

Here's a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.

Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?

I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.


You're right.

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


I pronounce it CUMmin.

And TURmeric.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 05:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,220
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

Dan Abel wrote:

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


I pronounce it CUMmin.


I pronounce it koo-man.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 05:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,220
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

Goomba wrote:
Dan Abel wrote:

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


I pronounce it CUMmin.


I pronounce it koo-man.


wait.. make that "koo-min"
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 05:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,315
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

On Jun 30, 12:29�pm, Michel Boucher wrote:
"Janet" wrote in news:6csag2F3hevlnU1
@mid.individual.net:

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


Koo-men, as it is from the Spanish, comino, through the French cumin. �
Nowhere in those previous conditions was the first syllable pronounced
"kyu-".

Pronouncing it "kyu-" means you are saying the letter "u" ("yoo") as you
sound it in English, which is fine for English but not for words derived
from non-English sources. �This also implies that first contact was with
a written word, hence the error.

Or you could avoid that and pronounce it "jira" (as in jeera, not jyra)
which is the Indian word.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumin

What you (collectively) should decide is whether you will habitually
impose English pronunciation on words of foreign origin or adopt a
forever shifting reality. �I opt for the latter but as English is not my
father tongue I am here much like the residents of Washington DC, aware
of the problem, contributing to the debate, but likely not allowed to
vote.

For what it's worth, French imposes French pronunciation so that "cumin"
sounds like "cul-main" (or arse-hand ;-) ). �But then again French has
clearly defined rules. �

Further to this:

Do you say "sil-antro" or "chil-antro"?

Do you write "� la mode" (the proper way) or "ala/alla mode" (as though
it was Italian)?

Do you say Eye-rak or Eer�k (with emphasis on the last syllable)? �Guess
which one is correct (hint: it's not the way you would read it).

NOTICE: The comments and questions are addressed to all who read this and
who are unilingual anglophones, in any case where the author has used the
term "you". �This is not intended to be read as being directed at a
single individual. �Let's see how many people read this far ;-)


Um, rec.food.cooking is an *English* language Newsgroup... take yer
frogophone and shove it up yer dairy-ear.

cumin
[KUH-mihn, KYOO-mihn, KOO-mihn]
Also called comino , this ancient spice dates back to the Old
Testament. Shaped like a caraway seed, cumin is the dried fruit of a
plant in the parsley family. Its aromatic, nutty-flavored seeds come
in three colors: amber (the most widely available), white and black
(both found in Asian markets). White cumin seed is interchangeable
with amber, but the black seed has a more complex, peppery flavor.
Cumin is available in seed and ground forms. As with all seeds, herbs
and spices, it should be stored in a cool, dark place for no more than
6 months. Cumin is particularly popular in Middle Eastern, Asian and
Mediterranean cooking. Among other things, it's used to make curries,
chili powders and K�MMEL LIQUEUR.

� Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 06:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,880
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

On Mon, 30 Jun 2008 10:56:03 -0400, "Janet"
wrote:

Now let's establish whether cumin is pronounced kooMEEN or CUEmin. G


or koomin


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 30-06-2008, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,550
Default Tumeric vs. Turmeric

wrote:

A minor annoyance, but I always thought the name of this spice was
spelled and pronounced "turmeric". It even says so on the bottle I
have in my cabinet, but all tv chefs pronounce it "tumeric", including
the Iron Chefs, Alton Brown, and the competitors on all the "reality"
cooking shows.

Here's a link:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

Whenever I hear it pronounced "tumeric", I can't help thinking of
tumors.

Shouldn't professional chefs, food scientists, writers and critics
learn the proper names of their ingredients?

I may be nit-picking but I think I'm right on this issue.


I wholey agree!

Kate

--
Kate Connally
If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
Until you bite their heads off.
What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?

 




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