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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

But I want DENSE dumplins!



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2008, 08:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 47
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2008, 08:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,457
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!


"levelwave" wrote in message
...
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?


Denser than Bisquick is pretty dense. My mother used to make them that way,
and I thought they were pretty gloppy. You might just increase the dry
ingredients.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2008, 08:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,294
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

On Tue 22 Jan 2008 12:03:10p, levelwave told us...

Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john


I prefer rolled dumplings, which are definitely not light and fluffy or
biscuit-like. They have substance. You might give that a try.

--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
Date: Tuesday, 01(I)/22(XXII)/08(MMVIII)
*******************************************
I'm in shape ... round's a shape isn't it?
*******************************************




  #4 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2008, 08:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,727
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

levelwave wrote:
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john


What you're looking for is "rolled dumplings". Google. Some of us (me
counted) don't want the dumplings being so heavy they become the meal and
overwhelm everything else in the pot of chicken and dumplings.

But, if you follow directions for making *drop* dumplings you can make them
very small; start out with 1/4-1/2 tsp. size lumps of dough. Then if you
cook them 10 minutes without the lid on the pot, then dunk them into the
simmering liquid with the back of a spoon, then cover the pot and cook them
another 10 minutes, they are more dense.

I still don't care for rolled dumplings. I'd rather have noodles in my
chicken stew.

Jill


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2008, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,122
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!


"levelwave" wrote in message
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I
add them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the
recipe on the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of
them and they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to
goo in the pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and
could share a recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no
leavener?

Levelwave - here on the Delmarva Peninsula they're called "slippery
dumplings" and I think that's what you're looking for. Google on that -
there are quite a few recipes.

Dora

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 22-01-2008, 10:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,453
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

levelwave wrote:

Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?


Oh, you want my mother's dumplings. Flour (maybe two cups) with liberal
amounts of salt and pepper. A couple of eggs and enough milk added to
make a "Plop-able" mixture. Drop by spoonsful into boiling* liquid.

*This is important. Dropping this mixture into a liquid solution at
less than boiling temperature will result in a pot full of concrete.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 12:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

"cybercat" wrote in message
...

"levelwave" wrote in message
...
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?


Denser than Bisquick is pretty dense. My mother used to make them that
way, and I thought they were pretty gloppy. You might just increase the
dry ingredients.



Look in the mirror to see a dense dumpling.


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 12:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

"Michael "Dog3"" wrote in message
6.121...
Wayne Boatwright dropped this
3.184: in
rec.food.cooking

On Tue 22 Jan 2008 12:03:10p, levelwave told us...

Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john


I prefer rolled dumplings, which are definitely not light and fluffy or
biscuit-like. They have substance. You might give that a try.


Maybe I'm in a twisted mood but this dumpling thread has me LMAO. I like
my dumplings firm, round with a moderate density.

Michael



Slut!


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 01:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,392
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

On Jan 22, 11:03*am, levelwave wrote:
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john


Only made them once, so I can not offer a recipe - my mom makes hers
with egg noodles added, and serves it over mashed potatoes! That is a
meal that calls for hibernation
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 04:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,267
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!


"levelwave" wrote in message
...
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john


Absolutely. For dumplin's with bite, you want nothing more than eggs, flour, s&p. And
you don't even have to have the s&p! Once in a while, particularly if I just made
stock, I'll add a bit of chicken fat.
Really that is all I use, and it's the way we like them...I never could stand those
wussy fluff balls.

kimberly

  #11 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 73
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

On Tue, 22 Jan 2008 11:03:10 -0800 (PST), levelwave wrote:

Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?

~john

You ain't alone. ( cain't you tell I'm one of them trailer trash folks?)

Dumplings (Mama's Little Leadballs)

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons butter
1 cup milk

Mix together flour, baking powder and salt. Bring just to a simmer in a small saucepan
the butter and milk. Add to the dry ingredients. Stir with a fork or knead by hand 2
to 3 times until the mixture just comes together. Push the chicken pieces down so that
they are submerged in gravy and gently drop spoonfuls of the dumpling dough over the
top. Cover pan tightly and simmer slowly for 15 to 20 minutes. Don't remove the lid.
Serve immediately.


This works for me 'cept I cook them another 5 minutes with the cover off.


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 07:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 870
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

On Jan 23, 9:47´┐Żam, Larry LaMere wrote:
On Tue, 22 Jan 2008 11:03:10 -0800 (PST), levelwave wrote:
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add
them to the pot of "Chicken 'n Dumplings"... I followed the recipe on
the back of the bisquick box, even kneaded the hell out of them and
they still were way too soft and fell apart or turned to goo in the
pot. Does anyone else prefer heavy dense dumplins and could share a
recipe? I'm guessing just stick with AP flour and no leavener?


~john


You ain't alone. ( cain't you tell I'm one of them trailer trash folks?)

Dumplings (Mama's Little Leadballs)

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons butter
1 cup milk

Mix together flour, baking powder and salt. Bring just to a simmer in a small saucepan
the butter and milk. Add to the dry ingredients. Stir with a fork or knead by hand 2
to 3 times until the mixture just comes together. Push the chicken pieces down so that
they are submerged in gravy and gently drop spoonfuls of the dumpling dough over the
top. Cover pan tightly and simmer slowly for 15 to 20 minutes. Don't remove the lid.
Serve immediately.

This works for me 'cept I cook them another 5 minutes with the cover off.


I'm with you kid. Those are my kind of dumplings.
Rosie
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 23-01-2008, 07:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,896
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

In article , "Nexis"
wrote:

"levelwave" wrote in message
...
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add


Absolutely. For dumplin's with bite, you want nothing more than eggs,
flour, s&p. And you don't even have to have the s&p! Once in a
while, particularly if I just made stock, I'll add a bit of chicken
fat. Really that is all I use, and it's the way we like them...I
never could stand those wussy fluff balls.


kimberly


What differentiates your dumplings from egg noodles, kimberly?
Thickness? Width? Color me Curious.

--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com; check the second note and
tell me if you knowwhat it is.
Laissez les bons temps rouler!
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2008, 05:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
isw
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Posts: 739
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

In article ,
Melba's Jammin' wrote:

In article , "Nexis"
wrote:

"levelwave" wrote in message
...
Not light and fluffy biscuit-like dumplings that fall apart when I add


Absolutely. For dumplin's with bite, you want nothing more than eggs,
flour, s&p. And you don't even have to have the s&p! Once in a
while, particularly if I just made stock, I'll add a bit of chicken
fat. Really that is all I use, and it's the way we like them...I
never could stand those wussy fluff balls.


kimberly


What differentiates your dumplings from egg noodles, kimberly?
Thickness? Width? Color me Curious.


My grandmother (and so I) make dumplings just like pie crust, except the
liquid is 50-50 buttermilk and hot broth (Crisco and flour, no
leavening, no eggs). Flour the counter, roll out about 1/4" thick, cut
in strips about 1" wide, and tear off pieces into the boiling broth,
stretching them a bit as you go.

You can either cook them "dry" so they can be piled on a plate, or "wet"
which is like a really thick chicken soup (that's the way I like it).

Now I'm hungry.

Isaac
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 24-01-2008, 05:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,984
Default But I want DENSE dumplins!

isw wrote:

My grandmother (and so I) make dumplings just like pie crust, except the
liquid is 50-50 buttermilk and hot broth (Crisco and flour, no
leavening, no eggs). Flour the counter, roll out about 1/4" thick, cut
in strips about 1" wide, and tear off pieces into the boiling broth,
stretching them a bit as you go.


Yeah, rolled and cut thick strips is how a neighbor taught me to make
it, but I've done the drop dumplings at times too. I just don't make it
often enough. She used to make it frequently for large Wednesday night
dinners at the church and she could feed a mess of folks cheap with
chicken and dumplings. I used to love helping her. She could cook it all
at home, often not starting it until the afternoon of the meal, and haul
it over to her church to finish it off. I learned a lot from that woman.
Goomba
 




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