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'Soup Kitchen' ideas



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 09:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,282
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

We've gotten friendly with the church our huge monster commercial chest
freezer went to. (Replaced by a newer model as mentioned in the past).

On Sunday and holidays, they have a big free potluck for local homeless and
others who are short on funds. When it gets cold like it is now, they
always have trouble having enough food to go around. They arent government
subsidized or anything.

We signed up to bring food on this Sunday (and plan to for the first Sunday
of each month if work permits me to be off to bring it, will alternate
another Sunday if cant or drop off something during the week if needed).

Anyways, I'd love any ideas of things others would find useful to feed at
least 20 people a good serving for 6$ or roughly that. This isnt intended
to be a full meal, just one of 3-4 items they'd get.

For tomorrow, I have a hodge podge bean pot using 2lbs (dry weight) butter
beans, 1 largish onion, 1 green bell pepper (big one) and about 1/2 cup
frozen chopped green bell pepper (one that was not going to be used fast
enough so we chopped and froze it which works find for a crockpot need), 2
smallish ham hocks (2$ worth at 1.39lb), a splash of mirin (a japanese rice
cooking wine), some osem brand chicken consomme powder, and water. This is
all in a very LARGE oval crockpot and I think it fair to say 25 servings in
that. 6.5 quart? There won't be much meat per person, but the protein
content should be high and it can go as a soup or as a topping on rice.

They have a large ricemaker so I added in 5 cups dryweight of hinode (a
brand of medium grain 'sticky' rice).

I am thinking I may try next Sunday too with a large batch of
dashi-tofu-chinese broccoli soup to serve in mugs with a 1/4 cup of rice at
the bottom. It will make a nice warming soup and I can get tofu at 3 for a
dollar (about 3/4 cup block each). Might change the greenery type pending
on what there is fresh at the asian grocery, but they always have something
grin. They have these 3 big tureens of broth at the door which are often
just bullion cubes and water so 6 quarts of this soup would be a nice match
to the beef and chicken ones.

I was thinking a large pot of spagetti sauce but that shows up every time
since it's pretty easy to hit 3$ for 20 servings if you leave out the
mushrooms and meats. (They have their own pots for making up the pasta and
folks gift them with dried pasta all the time so just bringing the sauce is
ok).

One they arent used to but I didnt know in time for this week to stock up,
is just baked potatoes or baked yams. Thats dead simple too and I'd be able
to make up a big pot of either in the crock. If doing sweet yams, I could
make a sauce and have them soft and like 'baked yams with brown sugar'. I
passed the idea over though and they think it will work well.

Oh, the place for food safety reasons *does* have rules and won't just take
'anything from anyone' and put it on the line. If it is prone to fast
spoilage for example, they require it be made there on site g.

The only rules are it be safe, and have as close to 20 servings as possible.
They also ask us to not become poor ourselves by adding in more than we can
afford.

Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd also
like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in winter,
warming things like soups and stews.


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 09:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,524
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

On Jan 5, 1:17*pm, "cshenk" wrote:
[snip]
We signed up to bring food on this Sunday (and plan to for the first Sunday
of each month if work permits me to be off to bring it, will alternate
another Sunday if cant or drop off something during the week if needed).

Anyways, I'd love any ideas of things others would find useful to feed at
least 20 people a good serving for 6$ or roughly that. *This isnt intended
to be a full meal, just one of 3-4 items they'd get.


If it's church related, how can you not serve lentils? They're fast,
nutritious, can be delicious, and appear numerous times in the bible.
Make them even better by starting with a little bacon and finishing
with cheese toast.... -aem
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 10:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,955
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

cshenk wrote:

Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd also
like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in winter,
warming things like soups and stews.


Does the church get free government cheese?
If so, cheese pizza would be cheap to make,
needing only flour, labor, and a #10 can
of tomato sauce.

Also, cheese enchiladas and quesadillas
would be cheap and easy to make.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 10:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 107
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas


"cshenk" wrote in message
...
We've gotten friendly with the church our huge monster commercial chest
freezer went to. (Replaced by a newer model as mentioned in the past).

On Sunday and holidays, they have a big free potluck for local homeless
and others who are short on funds. When it gets cold like it is now, they
always have trouble having enough food to go around. They arent
government subsidized or anything.

We signed up to bring food on this Sunday (and plan to for the first
Sunday of each month if work permits me to be off to bring it, will
alternate another Sunday if cant or drop off something during the week if
needed).

Anyways, I'd love any ideas of things others would find useful to feed at
least 20 people a good serving for 6$ or roughly that. This isnt intended
to be a full meal, just one of 3-4 items they'd get.

For tomorrow, I have a hodge podge bean pot using 2lbs (dry weight) butter
beans, 1 largish onion, 1 green bell pepper (big one) and about 1/2 cup
frozen chopped green bell pepper (one that was not going to be used fast
enough so we chopped and froze it which works find for a crockpot need), 2
smallish ham hocks (2$ worth at 1.39lb), a splash of mirin (a japanese
rice cooking wine), some osem brand chicken consomme powder, and water.
This is all in a very LARGE oval crockpot and I think it fair to say 25
servings in that. 6.5 quart? There won't be much meat per person, but
the protein content should be high and it can go as a soup or as a topping
on rice.

They have a large ricemaker so I added in 5 cups dryweight of hinode (a
brand of medium grain 'sticky' rice).

I am thinking I may try next Sunday too with a large batch of
dashi-tofu-chinese broccoli soup to serve in mugs with a 1/4 cup of rice
at the bottom. It will make a nice warming soup and I can get tofu at 3
for a dollar (about 3/4 cup block each). Might change the greenery type
pending on what there is fresh at the asian grocery, but they always have
something grin. They have these 3 big tureens of broth at the door
which are often just bullion cubes and water so 6 quarts of this soup
would be a nice match to the beef and chicken ones.

I was thinking a large pot of spagetti sauce but that shows up every time
since it's pretty easy to hit 3$ for 20 servings if you leave out the
mushrooms and meats. (They have their own pots for making up the pasta
and folks gift them with dried pasta all the time so just bringing the
sauce is ok).

One they arent used to but I didnt know in time for this week to stock up,
is just baked potatoes or baked yams. Thats dead simple too and I'd be
able to make up a big pot of either in the crock. If doing sweet yams, I
could make a sauce and have them soft and like 'baked yams with brown
sugar'. I passed the idea over though and they think it will work well.

Oh, the place for food safety reasons *does* have rules and won't just
take 'anything from anyone' and put it on the line. If it is prone to
fast spoilage for example, they require it be made there on site g.

The only rules are it be safe, and have as close to 20 servings as
possible. They also ask us to not become poor ourselves by adding in more
than we can afford.

Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd
also like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in
winter, warming things like soups and stews.



Sometimes here we get chicken legs for $.29/lb. With these you can make a
dynamite chicken soup, baked chicken with rice and a veg, chicken pot pie,
chicken casseroles, etc.

Another good idea, to me, is split pea soup. Bits of ham make it nice
and/or sliced sausage added in at the end.

Cabbage is another good veg either for braising and serving with hot
dogs/other meat or making soup with. It makes a ton and can usually be
found at about $.39/lb.

Quiche and eggy things such as that are also good when filled with cheaper
ingredients and made in to casseroles.

I sometimes run across bananas and other fruits at a good price and I'm sure
that those would be welcomed also. I'm sure if these folks are hurting for
money that they think fresh fruit and veg are prohibitively priced.

just ideas.....
helen


  #5 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 10:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,282
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

"aem" wrote:
[snip]
We signed up to bring food on this Sunday (and plan to for the first
Sunday
inst intended to be a full meal, just one of 3-4 items they'd get.


If it's church related, how can you not serve lentils? They're fast,
nutritious, can be delicious, and appear numerous times in the bible.
Make them even better by starting with a little bacon and finishing
with cheese toast....


Lentils eh? Oddly thats an item I have made only rarely. The cheese toast
would be hard for me to manage and have it still be warm.

To flesh this out, they have an average of 100 customers on these Sunday
events at this season (hence the dish size should fit 20 or more). It's
very much a small local thing and in summer drifts down to about 50-60
folks. It's held about 2 hours after church services. At then end, if
there is food left over, (tends to be none in winter I am told), those with
a need can take all they want home with them.

In winter, there may not be enough to go around but they have standby stuff
so all will have 'something' even if it's just pasta and spagetti sauce. No
one leaves hungry.

They do not accept or desire to have fancy funding. It's a sort of 'family
thing'. Some 30 folks contribute and while you can bring anything (food
safety note earlier posted), they also have a list of what expected already
on a board so folks can try to offset.

They made me laugh when they said how that started. Apparently a local
grocery had a killer sale on chicken and one Sunday, they had 15 pots of
chicken soup and 5 baked chickens, plus 4 'other things'. Now, they have a
blackboard and you can just call and ask 'what's cookin' then offset a bit.

Some of the more flush members bring a consistant set of meat dishes.
Several less flush ones bring green bean salads and canned veggies. 1 gifts
20$ a month for the use at the day old bread store (can get a full loaf for
about 50cents and lots of other things there than plain white).

If I had the *$* I would do more, but they have made me feel very
comfortable to contribute what I can afford and made it easy for me to see
what might be a good mix with what's already known.

Grin, getting long winded but: 20 servings each, 100 people, can handle 5
people bringing crockpots of beans. 5 people with stews. 5 people with
vegetables. 5 people with desserts. Each providing 20 servings x5=100. The
stray 10 other of the 20, provide various other things.

Not all play every Sunday. Being a newcomer, I am not part of the regulars
yet. I just fit myself in where it seems there isnt too much of one thing
and this is only my 3rd time doing it. First time: veggie soup/stew with
chicken and diced tomatoes. Second was: baked apples (cored with a little
brown sugar and butter, halved to make 18 servings), and the bean pot
tomorrow.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 10:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,282
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

"Janet" wrote.

little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd


I do a monthly volunteer stint at the soup kitchen in the nearby city,
where we feed about 250 per night. Our night is almost always tuna noodle


Wow! Now, this operation is much smaller. Only Sunday afternoon/early
evening.

casserole, salad, and vegetable (usually canned green beans or something
equally revolting, but occasionally we get enough of a fresh vegetable to
do that) on the side, plus bread, beverages, and dessert. We don't get to
set


Humm, wee bit fancier here. But then, we are feeding a mere 100 at high
season.

the menu, although we can rummage around and find better ingredients to
fix it up a bit. (I've taken to bringing pounds of butter from home,
because


Hehe I can see that one!

usually there's just margarine.) I don't know what your clientele is like,
but our is heavy on people who have been living rough for a long time, and
probably have mental health issues and have been self-medicating for
decades with alcohol or drugs. Tastes are not sophisticated, and teeth
tend to be in


Mostly newly homeless (and seldom stay that way) or just really broke at the
end of the month. Many women with kids and 'dad' left, still in an
apartment but with little to no income. It's not a well known place and
frankly, isnt able to carry the load of being known better.

poor shape. Most of the things you suggest, although they sound good to
me, would not go over well with our crowd. It can be disappointing if you
really like to cook. You might want to start out with something pretty
safe, and


Heheh well, it's ok. I dont expect rave reviews. Just warm tummies.

The dashi soup is a replacement for a well recieved 'fish soup' they used to
have, but the gentleman who made it, died about 8 months ago. I live on the
coast so fish based soups are common here.

then see what goes over well and gradually become more venturesome.
There's even something to be said for tuna noodle casserole, when it's
well made! G


Yup! I can add that to my list!

I see this week they have:
2 tuna noodle cassaroles
2 chile pots with beans
3 various chicken stew/soups
3 bean pots (one is mine)
1 meatloaf
1 pork shoulder (pulled pork I am sure)
Fried chicken
(other stuff not going to type in but you get the idea).

Lots of veggies in the bunch not listed.


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 11:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,282
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

"Mark Thorson" wrote
Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd
also
like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in
winter,
warming things like soups and stews.


Does the church get free government cheese?


No, they are just a sort of home-grown sort of place. No funding. They
like it that way.

If so, cheese pizza would be cheap to make,
needing only flour, labor, and a #10 can
of tomato sauce.


That would be great except while the room they use has lots of outlets for
crockpots, the kitchen has only one oven with 4 burners and a side 4 burner
unit donated later. Sorry if I made it sound like a bigger operation than
it is, but it feeds a max of 100 and then only in winter. Normal is about
50. Now with 50, the pizza is possible but with more, it would be too slow
or have to be served cold.

Grin, it's basically a big room with tables along the walls lined with
crockpots and warming 'tea light' flat servers (Chaffing dishes?)


Also, cheese enchiladas and quesadillas
would be cheap and easy to make.


Oh that sparks an idea!

Big pot of unspiced pintos and kidneys, cook down and remove from liquid
then mash. Add ro-tel tomatoes with chiles and serve on warmed flour
tortillas with a little grated cheese if we have it.



  #8 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 11:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,880
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

On Sat, 5 Jan 2008 16:17:13 -0500, "cshenk" wrote:

Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd also
like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in winter,
warming things like soups and stews.


Pasta comes to mind - lasagna, penne with vegetables....

http://recipesforacrowd.com/
http://www.razzledazzlerecipes.com/quantity/

--
See return address to reply by email
remove the smiley face first
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 11:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,282
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

"chefhelen" wrote

Sometimes here we get chicken legs for $.29/lb. With these you can make a
dynamite chicken soup, baked chicken with rice and a veg, chicken pot pie,
chicken casseroles, etc.


Absolutely! I havent seen it that cheap yet since getting back stateside,
but we have seen .49lb a time or so.

Another good idea, to me, is split pea soup. Bits of ham make it nice
and/or sliced sausage added in at the end.


Yes! A definate! I've even done that with the cheap Dak canned hams with
decent success and could afford that well enough.

Cabbage is another good veg either for braising and serving with hot
dogs/other meat or making soup with. It makes a ton and can usually be
found at about $.39/lb.


Yes, with a little olive oil and sesame oil and onions then sliver carrots
over it, add water and wilt in a pan, it's good warm or cold.

Quiche and eggy things such as that are also good when filled with cheaper
ingredients and made in to casseroles.


Humm, eggs are now pricey here. Can run 3$ a carton of 12 now.

I sometimes run across bananas and other fruits at a good price and I'm
sure that those would be welcomed also. I'm sure if these folks are
hurting for money that they think fresh fruit and veg are prohibitively
priced.


Yup! The one time I made baked apples, they disappeared really fast.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 11:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,949
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

On Sat, 5 Jan 2008 18:27:46 -0500, "cshenk" wrote:


Humm, eggs are now pricey here. Can run 3$ a carton of 12 now.


If you are near a Trader Joes, check out eggs there. Their prices are
usually very good for eggs, and would be much cheaper than that.
Usually run in the neighborhood of about $1-$1.19/dozen.


Christine
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2008, 11:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,744
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas


sf wrote in message ...
On Sat, 5 Jan 2008 16:17:13 -0500, "cshenk" wrote:

Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd
also
like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in
winter,
warming things like soups and stews.





For cooking for a group, not particularly a 'soup kitchen,' this book has
loads of nice recipes.
I'm sending this in case there is anyone interested in cooking for a crowd
who has been reading this thread:

http://www.amazon.com/Moosewood-Rest...575891&sr=1-13

Moosewood Restaurant Cooks for a Crowd: Recipes With a Vegetarian Emphasis
for 24 or More (Hardcover)
$15.99 free shipping

I've checked out this book at the library. It has lots of good ideas and I
considered buying it, but I have too many Moosewood 'un-used' cookbooks.

Dee Dee



  #12 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2008, 12:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,219
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

On Jan 5, 4:14 pm, "chefhelen" wrote:
"cshenk" wrote in message

...







We've gotten friendly with the church our huge monster commercial chest
freezer went to. (Replaced by a newer model as mentioned in the past).


On Sunday and holidays, they have a big free potluck for local homeless
and others who are short on funds. When it gets cold like it is now, they
always have trouble having enough food to go around. They arent
government subsidized or anything.


We signed up to bring food on this Sunday (and plan to for the first
Sunday of each month if work permits me to be off to bring it, will
alternate another Sunday if cant or drop off something during the week if
needed).


Anyways, I'd love any ideas of things others would find useful to feed at
least 20 people a good serving for 6$ or roughly that. This isnt intended
to be a full meal, just one of 3-4 items they'd get.


For tomorrow, I have a hodge podge bean pot using 2lbs (dry weight) butter
beans, 1 largish onion, 1 green bell pepper (big one) and about 1/2 cup
frozen chopped green bell pepper (one that was not going to be used fast
enough so we chopped and froze it which works find for a crockpot need), 2
smallish ham hocks (2$ worth at 1.39lb), a splash of mirin (a japanese
rice cooking wine), some osem brand chicken consomme powder, and water.
This is all in a very LARGE oval crockpot and I think it fair to say 25
servings in that. 6.5 quart? There won't be much meat per person, but
the protein content should be high and it can go as a soup or as a topping
on rice.


They have a large ricemaker so I added in 5 cups dryweight of hinode (a
brand of medium grain 'sticky' rice).


I am thinking I may try next Sunday too with a large batch of
dashi-tofu-chinese broccoli soup to serve in mugs with a 1/4 cup of rice
at the bottom. It will make a nice warming soup and I can get tofu at 3
for a dollar (about 3/4 cup block each). Might change the greenery type
pending on what there is fresh at the asian grocery, but they always have
something grin. They have these 3 big tureens of broth at the door
which are often just bullion cubes and water so 6 quarts of this soup
would be a nice match to the beef and chicken ones.


I was thinking a large pot of spagetti sauce but that shows up every time
since it's pretty easy to hit 3$ for 20 servings if you leave out the
mushrooms and meats. (They have their own pots for making up the pasta
and folks gift them with dried pasta all the time so just bringing the
sauce is ok).


One they arent used to but I didnt know in time for this week to stock up,
is just baked potatoes or baked yams. Thats dead simple too and I'd be
able to make up a big pot of either in the crock. If doing sweet yams, I
could make a sauce and have them soft and like 'baked yams with brown
sugar'. I passed the idea over though and they think it will work well.


Oh, the place for food safety reasons *does* have rules and won't just
take 'anything from anyone' and put it on the line. If it is prone to
fast spoilage for example, they require it be made there on site g.


The only rules are it be safe, and have as close to 20 servings as
possible. They also ask us to not become poor ourselves by adding in more
than we can afford.


Any other ideas? They will be most welcome! I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. I'd
also like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in
winter, warming things like soups and stews.


Sometimes here we get chicken legs for $.29/lb. With these you can make a
dynamite chicken soup, baked chicken with rice and a veg, chicken pot pie,
chicken casseroles, etc.


That was exactly what I was going to suggest. If volunteers are up
for adding the *love* (read: labor), then leg quarters gotten dirt
cheap are always great.

First, separate into 3 pieces, drumstick, thigh and back portion.
Reserve drumsticks to cook whole, maybe popping them into that large
freezer to accumulate to fry for some future meal, like fried chicken
drumsticks and baked potatoes.
The thighs can be baked, then the meat taken off of the bones, and the
bones tossed in the large stock pot with the back portions (from which
those nasty little lymph glands should first be removed). Toss in an
onion or onions, and let boil and reduce. Strain it and reduce more.
Add carrots and celery, which are cheap bought in large bags, and
after that's cooked, add boatloads of noodles, then the thigh meat
(cut into small pieces), and some parsley flakes and black pepper.
Have salt on the table to add as desired.

There are so many things you can do with leg quarters, but the
important part is getting them cheap and not wasting any. The skins
could be fried into cracklins, and people could take little bags with
them. Another great thing to serve with chicken is rice. It is SO
cheap, and a little soy sauce and finely chopped onion can turn it
into a great accompaniment.

Potatoes can be gotten cheaply too, and real butter and (I'll catch
Hell for this) a bit of MSG, with some milk, can make a lot of mashed
potatoes for not a lot of money. S&P on the side, of course.
Volunteers can serve on washable plates, with washable flatware, and
include some of the recipients in the washing up. Don't waste money
on disposables; money that could be spent on food should not be spent
on throw-aways.

Another good idea, to me, is split pea soup. Bits of ham make it nice
and/or sliced sausage added in at the end.

Cabbage is another good veg either for braising and serving with hot
dogs/other meat or making soup with. It makes a ton and can usually be
found at about $.39/lb.


I know that beggars can't be choosers, but a non-cabbage alternative
should always be available. Cruciferous vegetables make some of us
want to hurl.

Quiche and eggy things such as that are also good when filled with cheaper
ingredients and made in to casseroles.


Eggs in general. So good, so inexpensive.

I sometimes run across bananas and other fruits at a good price and I'm sure
that those would be welcomed also. I'm sure if these folks are hurting for
money that they think fresh fruit and veg are prohibitively priced.


That's nice. I work at a church, and they do this thing called "Room
at the Inn," where homeless folks spend the night there. They make
food for them for dinner and breakfast. It's usually 6-10 homeless,
up to a max of 12. They never make anything I'd want to eat, but I'd
have happily eaten it when *I* lived on the street (when I was 20
years old, for Dec. - Feb. '80-'81). I know, what a dumbass thing
that was, but I was a little bit depressed at the time.
Anyway, good home cookin', with fresh ingredients, especially fresh
veggies would be a very kind thing to do for folks who are down on
their luck.

I hope that this is helpful, and please don't feed them trans fats.
These folks don't have the resources to afford heart bypasses/
transplants.

just ideas.....
helen


--Bryan
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2008, 12:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,879
Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

cshenk wrote:
We've gotten friendly with the church our huge monster commercial chest
freezer went to.

On Sunday and holidays, they have a big free potluck for local homeless and
others who are short on funds.


Any other ideas? They will be most welcome!




Your favorite chili served over rice with lots of grated cheese.

A baked potato bar, with various toppings like broccoli in a cheese
sauce or chili.

Stew, any kind; veg-beef-barley soup

Curried chicken and rice

Hot dogs and baked beans with red cabbage as a side.

Any kind of "hot dish", a la Barb Schaller. She has posted about
feeding the guests at their local Ronald McDonald House.

Lasagna

Macaroni and cheese with spicy hamburger or bits of ham

Roast turkey

Regarding cost, you may be able to get a local grocery store to sponsor
an occasional meal or at least sell you meat at cost.

gloria p
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2008, 12:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

On Sat, 5 Jan 2008 18:27:46 -0500, "cshenk" wrote:

"chefhelen" wrote


I sometimes run across bananas and other fruits at a good price and I'm
sure that those would be welcomed also. I'm sure if these folks are
hurting for money that they think fresh fruit and veg are prohibitively
priced.


Yup! The one time I made baked apples, they disappeared really fast.

Thinking back to the church suppers of my childhood.... how about
plain mashed/whipped sweet potatoes or butternut squash?


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  #15 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2008, 01:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 'Soup Kitchen' ideas

I really think your serving your community via a soup-line is noble.

I would roast two chickens like say in crockpots (or better yet
turkey). Then make brown rice, topped with gravy derived from the
crockpot stock, carrots & celery too (maybe other veggies depending on
sales but not potatoes because of the rice). I'd make biscuits half
whole wheat probably, white ones would be prefered by some, the good
ones by others.

I don't know if soup lines do a desert. Cake I think would be your
cheapest, fruit or a cobbler would be best nutrition I suppose.
Restaurants or grocers may donate. I home deliver meals to shut-ins
in my community and the food comes from Golden Corral (local buffet)
donations.

I haven't ran a soup line, so I don't base this on experience. It is
instead my thoughts on high nutrition per dollar. If your customers
stomaches are really out of whack (ever been around a meth adict?)
they will not handle the complex stuff, but what can you do?

oOn Jan 5, 4:17*pm, "cshenk" wrote:
We've gotten friendly with the church our huge monster commercial chest
freezer went to. *(Replaced by a newer model as mentioned in the past).

On Sunday and holidays, they have a big free potluck for local homeless and
others who are short on funds. *When it gets cold like it is now, they
always have trouble having enough food to go around. *They arent government
subsidized or anything.

We signed up to bring food on this Sunday (and plan to for the first Sunday
of each month if work permits me to be off to bring it, will alternate
another Sunday if cant or drop off something during the week if needed).

Anyways, I'd love any ideas of things others would find useful to feed at
least 20 people a good serving for 6$ or roughly that. *This isnt intended
to be a full meal, just one of 3-4 items they'd get.

For tomorrow, I have a hodge podge bean pot using 2lbs (dry weight) butter
beans, 1 largish onion, 1 green bell pepper (big one) and about 1/2 cup
frozen chopped green bell pepper (one that was not going to be used fast
enough so we chopped and froze it which works find for a crockpot need), 2
smallish ham hocks (2$ worth at 1.39lb), a splash of mirin (a japanese rice
cooking wine), some osem brand chicken consomme powder, and water. *This is
all in a very LARGE oval crockpot and I think it fair to say 25 servings in
that. *6.5 quart? *There won't be much meat per person, but the protein
content should be high and it can go as a soup or as a topping on rice.

They have a large ricemaker so I added in 5 cups dryweight of hinode (a
brand of medium grain 'sticky' rice).

I am thinking I may try next Sunday too with a large batch of
dashi-tofu-chinese broccoli soup to serve in mugs with a 1/4 cup of rice at
the bottom. *It will make a nice warming soup and I can get tofu at 3 for a
dollar (about 3/4 cup block each). *Might change the greenery type pending
on what there is fresh at the asian grocery, but they always have something
grin. *They have these 3 big tureens of broth at the door which are often
just bullion cubes and water so 6 quarts of this soup would be a nice match
to the beef and chicken ones.

I was thinking a large pot of spagetti sauce but that shows up every time
since it's pretty easy to hit 3$ for 20 servings if you leave out the
mushrooms and meats. *(They have their own pots for making up the pasta and
folks gift them with dried pasta all the time so just bringing the sauce is
ok).

One they arent used to but I didnt know in time for this week to stock up,
is just baked potatoes or baked yams. *Thats dead simple too and I'd be able
to make up a big pot of either in the crock. *If doing sweet yams, I could
make a sauce and have them soft and like 'baked yams with brown sugar'. *I
passed the idea over though and they think it will work well.

Oh, the place for food safety reasons *does* have rules and won't just take
'anything from anyone' and put it on the line. *If it is prone to fast
spoilage for example, they require it be made there on site g.

The only rules are it be safe, and have as close to 20 servings as possible.
They also ask us to not become poor ourselves by adding in more than we can
afford.

Any other ideas? *They will be most welcome! *I plan to have fun and do a
little good in the world at the same time, while not going broke. *I'd also
like to try to add things with as much nutrition as possible and in winter,
warming things like soups and stews.


 




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