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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

steaming rice



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 03:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10
Default steaming rice

Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a pot
with a rice insert?

--
Brian (not wanting to be a messiah): "You are all individuals..."
Crowd (in unison): "We are all individuals..."
Monty Python's "Life Of Brian"
http://www.spampoison.com

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 03:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default steaming rice

"postingprofile" wrote in message
news
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a pot
with a rice insert?


Everyone's experiences are different, but in the past, I've found those
collapsible things are a nightmare to clean. Crud gets into the crevices.

What's wrong with just putting rice in a pot with the right amount of water?
I've never needed any kind of accessory for this simplest of kitchen tasks.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 03:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 165
Default steaming rice


"postingprofile" wrote in message
news
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a pot
with a rice insert?

I actually tried this once, and the holes are way to big. It might work
if you line the steamer with a towel, but I just decided to go back to using
a regular pot since that works just fine.

Brian Christiansen


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 05:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
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Posts: 3,524
Default steaming rice

On Sep 11, 7:04 am, postingprofile wrote:
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a pot
with a rice insert?

Why would you want to? "Steamed rice" is a misnomer for boiled rice.
Pot, rice, water, bring to boil, cover, turn heat to lowest setting,
done in 17-20 minutes. Let sit another 5-10 minutes. "And there you
have it!" -- steamed rice. -aem

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 10:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 6,727
Default steaming rice

aem wrote:
On Sep 11, 7:04 am, postingprofile wrote:
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a
pot with a rice insert?

Why would you want to? "Steamed rice" is a misnomer for boiled rice.
Pot, rice, water, bring to boil, cover, turn heat to lowest setting,
done in 17-20 minutes. Let sit another 5-10 minutes. "And there you
have it!" -- steamed rice. -aem


Actually, in order to "steam" boiled rice you have to take the lid off and
stir the rice after you cook it so the steam will release rather than keep
the rice moist. And, if I'm guessing correctly, the OP probably wants to
steam rice in order to make fried rice. If that's the case, they need to be
sure to chill it overnight. Good fried rice requires leftover steamed rice.
And be sure to cook it without added salt or fat.

Jill


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 10:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default steaming rice

"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
aem wrote:
On Sep 11, 7:04 am, postingprofile wrote:
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a
pot with a rice insert?

Why would you want to? "Steamed rice" is a misnomer for boiled rice.
Pot, rice, water, bring to boil, cover, turn heat to lowest setting,
done in 17-20 minutes. Let sit another 5-10 minutes. "And there you
have it!" -- steamed rice. -aem


Actually, in order to "steam" boiled rice you have to take the lid off and
stir the rice after you cook it so the steam will release rather than keep
the rice moist. And, if I'm guessing correctly, the OP probably wants to
steam rice in order to make fried rice. If that's the case, they need to
be
sure to chill it overnight. Good fried rice requires leftover steamed
rice.
And be sure to cook it without added salt or fat.

Jill



A month ago, I was looking for fried rice recipes and the only variation I
found in terms of cooking the rice was to use a different rice to water
ratio. 1.5 cups rice to 2 cups water, for instance, for a drier result.

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 10:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,311
Default steaming rice

One time on Usenet, "JoeSpareBedroom" said:

snip

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


That was my though too. I have an electric rice steamer, although I
use it for chicken and veggies a lot more than rice. Doing rice in the
saucepan works for me...

--
Jani in WA
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 10:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default steaming rice

"Little Malice" wrote in message
...
One time on Usenet, "JoeSpareBedroom" said:

snip

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


That was my though too. I have an electric rice steamer, although I
use it for chicken and veggies a lot more than rice. Doing rice in the
saucepan works for me...

--
Jani in WA


A google search for "steamed rice" turned up 183 billion results. I only
looked at the first 4 million. None involved anything but a pot and a lid.
No insert. One involved some preliminary steps I might try, but no other
gadgets.
http://shiokfood.com/notes/archives/000022.html


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 11-09-2007, 11:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,327
Default steaming rice

"JoeSpareBedroom" wrote in
:

"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
aem wrote:
On Sep 11, 7:04 am, postingprofile wrote:
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get
a pot with a rice insert?

Why would you want to? "Steamed rice" is a misnomer for boiled
rice. Pot, rice, water, bring to boil, cover, turn heat to lowest
setting, done in 17-20 minutes. Let sit another 5-10 minutes. "And
there you have it!" -- steamed rice. -aem


Actually, in order to "steam" boiled rice you have to take the lid
off and stir the rice after you cook it so the steam will release
rather than keep the rice moist. And, if I'm guessing correctly, the
OP probably wants to steam rice in order to make fried rice. If
that's the case, they need to be
sure to chill it overnight. Good fried rice requires leftover
steamed rice.
And be sure to cook it without added salt or fat.

Jill



A month ago, I was looking for fried rice recipes and the only
variation I found in terms of cooking the rice was to use a different
rice to water ratio. 1.5 cups rice to 2 cups water, for instance, for
a drier result.

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming"
is conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food
over, but not touching the water?




I have cooked rice in a pot on a stove, in a microwave and in a rice
cooker all using the standard time proven method...mix rice and water
together and heat to boiling.

I also have tried cooking rice in an electric veggie steamer...
While it is possible to steam rice...the taste isn't as good and the
texture suffers. This is my opion only...my ex liked rice cooked in a
steamer.

Lots of electric veggie steamers come with rice baskets and good
instructions. Some rice cookers come with veggie steamers (the mid to
upper cost range ones do in any case.) My kenmore veggie steamer came
with a rice basket and a egg rack. My black and decker rice cooker didn't
come with a veggie steamer insert as it is a cheap model.

To make fried rice requires slightly dried cooked rice...easiest gotten
by refridgerating a quantity of rice over night, another method is to use
a cookie sheet and slightly dry the rice in the oven if you have time
restraints.

These days if I desire cooked white rice I pick up a pint or 3 at the
chinese place at the top of my street on the way home. Plain rice is
cheap and in great supply there for cheap.



--

The house of the burning beet-Alan

It'll be a sunny day in August, when the Moon will shine that night-
Elbonian Folklore

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2007, 02:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2,664
Default steaming rice

To cook rice, I use the microwave. One cup of rice and two cups of
water in a covered corningware dish, cooked for 16-20 minutes. The rice
comes out perfect every time.

Becca
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2007, 03:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,880
Default steaming rice

On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 09:37:33 -0700, aem wrote:

On Sep 11, 7:04 am, postingprofile wrote:
Can I use a collapsible steamer basket to do this, or should I get a pot
with a rice insert?

Why would you want to? "Steamed rice" is a misnomer for boiled rice.
Pot, rice, water, bring to boil, cover, turn heat to lowest setting,
done in 17-20 minutes. Let sit another 5-10 minutes. "And there you
have it!" -- steamed rice. -aem


What Armenians (and I'm sure other middle eastern cultures in America)
do is put a towel between the pot and the pot lid during the steaming
phase of rice.

We have many ways to cook rice and none of them are wrong as long as
the rice isn't under cooked or over cooked when finished.
--

History is a vast early warning system
Norman Cousins
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2007, 03:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,880
Default steaming rice

On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 21:29:20 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


I'm assuming the OP doesn't have access to a common machine called a
"rice cooker", which is where someone like the OP would make "steamed"
rice.

Most Americans who don't cook rice on a regular basis don't have a
clue about how much water to rice is appropriate. So just dump the
rice into a large amount of water (with salt) and boil until the
kernels have popped, but there is still a hard center (about 10
minutes). Drain and place back into the pan which is now on low heat.
Let the rice "steam" for another 10 minutes. Voilą! You have rice
like you would get from a rice cooker.
--

History is a vast early warning system
Norman Cousins
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2007, 03:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,507
Default steaming rice

sf wrote:
On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 21:29:20 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


I'm assuming the OP doesn't have access to a common machine called a
"rice cooker", which is where someone like the OP would make "steamed"
rice.

Most Americans who don't cook rice on a regular basis don't have a
clue about how much water to rice is appropriate. So just dump the
rice into a large amount of water (with salt) and boil until the
kernels have popped, but there is still a hard center (about 10
minutes). Drain and place back into the pan which is now on low heat.
Let the rice "steam" for another 10 minutes. Voilą! You have rice
like you would get from a rice cooker.



I've started doing brown rice that way (it takes longer than 10 minutes)

Bob
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2007, 04:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,880
Default steaming rice

On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 21:49:41 -0500, zxcvbob
wrote:

sf wrote:
On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 21:29:20 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


I'm assuming the OP doesn't have access to a common machine called a
"rice cooker", which is where someone like the OP would make "steamed"
rice.

Most Americans who don't cook rice on a regular basis don't have a
clue about how much water to rice is appropriate. So just dump the
rice into a large amount of water (with salt) and boil until the
kernels have popped, but there is still a hard center (about 10
minutes). Drain and place back into the pan which is now on low heat.
Let the rice "steam" for another 10 minutes. Voilą! You have rice
like you would get from a rice cooker.



I've started doing brown rice that way (it takes longer than 10 minutes)

Brown rice always takes longer.

--

History is a vast early warning system
Norman Cousins
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 12-09-2007, 06:10 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,103
Default steaming rice

sf wrote in message ...
On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 21:29:20 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Is it possible that in the context of this thread, the word "steaming" is
conjuring the same images as steaming vegetables, with the food over, but
not touching the water?


I'm assuming the OP doesn't have access to a common machine called a
"rice cooker", which is where someone like the OP would make "steamed"
rice.

Most Americans who don't cook rice on a regular basis don't have a
clue about how much water to rice is appropriate. So just dump the
rice into a large amount of water (with salt) and boil until the
kernels have popped, but there is still a hard center (about 10
minutes). Drain and place back into the pan which is now on low heat.
Let the rice "steam" for another 10 minutes. Voilą! You have rice
like you would get from a rice cooker.




It's tough to read the instructions on the bag of rice. We're talking about
heavy lifting here.


 




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