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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 09:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
mm
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Posts: 168
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 11:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

mm wrote:
Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


Can you use it in carrot cake?

kili


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 01:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

Kili wrote:

Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


Can you use it in carrot cake?


I think carrot cake gets some of its moisture and sweetness from the juice
that seeps out of the carrots. In this case, the juice is mostly gone, so
I'd expect the cake to be extremely dry unless you added some extra liquid.

The carrot pulp might be okay in scones, which are already pretty dry. It
might be an interesting addition to pancake or waffle batter. It could be
stirred into mashed potatoes. (*snicker* You could trick someone into
thinking they were getting mashed sweet potatoes!) You could add it to
baked beans or hummus. It could add thickness and some flavor to a salad
dressing, a soup, a sauce, or gravy. For that matter, you could simply cook
it in chicken stock, ham stock, or V-8 and call it soup, or you could make a
dip by mixing it with sour cream, cream cheese, puréed roasted peppers, and
sun-dried tomatoes.

Bob


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 02:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 55
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

mm wrote:

Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


I'd add it to my dogs' rations. They get canned or fresh fruit and
veggies in addition to their kibble as an aid to weight control - they
feel fuller without taking in an excess of calories. Pumpkin puree is a
favorite, probably because it's somewhat sweet. Carrot pulp would
probably go over well for the same reason.

Kathleen

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 03:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

On Feb 26, 3:36 am, "mm" wrote:
Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


Do you have a yard? If so, you could work it into your flower beds or
vegetable garden.

David


  #6 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 03:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
mm
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Posts: 168
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

On Feb 26, 5:18 am, "Bob Terwilliger"
wrote:
Kili wrote:
Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


Can you use it in carrot cake?


I think carrot cake gets some of its moisture and sweetness from the juice
that seeps out of the carrots. In this case, the juice is mostly gone, so
I'd expect the cake to be extremely dry unless you added some extra liquid.

The carrot pulp might be okay in scones, which are already pretty dry. It
might be an interesting addition to pancake or waffle batter. It could be
stirred into mashed potatoes. (*snicker* You could trick someone into
thinking they were getting mashed sweet potatoes!) You could add it to
baked beans or hummus. It could add thickness and some flavor to a salad
dressing, a soup, a sauce, or gravy. For that matter, you could simply cook
it in chicken stock, ham stock, or V-8 and call it soup, or you could make a
dip by mixing it with sour cream, cream cheese, puréed roasted peppers, and
sun-dried tomatoes.


Soup sounds good for me; trying to stick to extremely healthy eating -
I am in strength training using weigth. I'll have only a small amount
of pulp at a time and so I can eat those fiber via soup.


Bob



  #7 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 04:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 413
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

On Feb 26, 10:10 am, "mm" wrote:

Soup sounds good for me; trying to stick to extremely healthy eating -
I am in strength training using weigth. I'll have only a small amount
of pulp at a time and so I can eat those fiber via soup.


shit-can it

by the time you get enough to do something with, the oldest collected
wad is gonna be rancid

YOU GONNA FREEZE IT?

why not stir it into something gulpable and just slam it, get the
fiber

Later


"Huggable trees need kissing too"

Barry

  #8 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 04:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

mm wrote:
Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.



Use it in quick breads or carrot cake
Feed it to vegetarian pets
Compost heap
Put it in meatloaf or meatballs

gloria p

  #9 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 04:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

On Feb 26, 11:27?am, Puester wrote:
mm wrote:
Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


Use it in quick breads or carrot cake
Feed it to vegetarian pets


I believe you mean *herbivores*... I seriously doubt your pet rabbit
is very political... and make no mistake about it, vegetarian/vegan
are most definitely political positions.

Compost heap
Put it in meatloaf or meatballs



Bran muffins.

Sheldon

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 04:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
mm
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Posts: 168
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

On Feb 26, 8:13 am, "Barry" wrote:
On Feb 26, 10:10 am, "mm" wrote:

Soup sounds good for me; trying to stick to extremely healthy eating -
I am in strength training using weigth. I'll have only a small amount
of pulp at a time and so I can eat those fiber via soup.


shit-can it

by the time you get enough to do something with, the oldest collected
wad is gonna be rancid

YOU GONNA FREEZE IT?

why not stir it into something gulpable and just slam it, get the
fiber

Yeah, I was going to stir it into chicken broth or V-8 and slam it
down my throat If I get sick of it, I'll throw away. Then start the
cycle of soup again..

Later

"Huggable trees need kissing too"

Barry



  #11 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 04:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
mm
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Posts: 168
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

On Feb 26, 7:10 am, "dtwright37" wrote:
On Feb 26, 3:36 am, "mm" wrote:

Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.


Do you have a yard? If so, you could work it into your flower beds or
vegetable garden.

David


No, I don't have time for yard work (though I currently live in a
house) or doing canning, no pet either (though I want one or two).


  #12 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 05:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,852
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

In article ,
Puester wrote:

mm wrote:
Is there anything I can use it in instead of throwing it away? Since
my juicer is not top notch, the pulp is not too dry.



Use it in quick breads or carrot cake
Feed it to vegetarian pets
Compost heap
Put it in meatloaf or meatballs

gloria p


I'd use it for stock...

It can be frozen until you are ready to use it.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 26-02-2007, 07:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 575
Default What do with the carrot pulp (or ny other pulp) after juicing?

In article ,
Peter A wrote:

If you eat the carrot pulp and also drink the juice, you will (miracle
of miracles) actually get the nutritional benefits of carrots.

There's a lot of good stuff in that pulp. The juicer manufacturers have
really fooled most of the public into thinking that drinking the juice
is as good as eating the whole item.


I've seen many ads for both juice and juicers that claim juice is
actually healthier for you by "concentrating" the nutrients. I can't
imagine that could possibly be true. The notion that plant nutrients
are carried mainly or only in the liquid parts of the plant makes little
sense to me. I can see not eating parts of a plant that are essentially
inedible (tough skins, shells, bitter rinds, etc) but throwing away the
solid or fibrous parts of an otherwise tasty food seems awfully wasteful
from both a nutritional and economic POV--- though I guess it is a
solution for people who cannot chew or who are on a medically prescribed
liquid diet.

Emma
 




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