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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

milk in meatloaf?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?

why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?

"Scott" wrote in message
...
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott


Never heard of using either one. Can you provide the whole recipe?


  #3 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?


"Scott" wrote in message
...
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?

Thanks
Scott


It enriches the meatloaf slightly because of its butterfat component. Cream
would do that more, obviously. That's why egg usually is in the recipe.

Kent


  #4 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?


"Scott" wrote in message
...
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?


Some recipes include soaking bread in milk, squeezing it out, and
incorporating the bread into the mix.

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?


Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott

================
My mother used to make a stuffed meat loaf and always used milk in the
meat loaf. I saw Emeril Legasse make a meatloaf using milk also. I
would assume that the milk while enriching the meatloaf, blending and
softening the bread crumbs, keeping it moist also holds the meat
together.

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?


Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott


I dunno. My BH & G recipe for favorite beef loaf calls for bread
soaked in milk for a couple minutes, and then torn into little bits.
It's a filler, like crumbs. The recipe (I don't have it with me) makes
a great-tasting meatloaf. I would never put water in a meatloaf -
tomato sauce, maybe; milk, definitely (as described), and always a
couple eggs.

N.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?

Quite a few years ago there used to be a meat loaf recipe using canned milk
on (of course) the canned milk label. I have not seen it in a long time,
but I no longer use much evaporated milk.

Vikki in WA State.


"Nancy2" wrote in message
ups.com...

Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott


I dunno. My BH & G recipe for favorite beef loaf calls for bread
soaked in milk for a couple minutes, and then torn into little bits.
It's a filler, like crumbs. The recipe (I don't have it with me) makes
a great-tasting meatloaf. I would never put water in a meatloaf -
tomato sauce, maybe; milk, definitely (as described), and always a
couple eggs.

N.



  #8 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 07:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,762
Default milk in meatloaf?


"pfoley" wrote

Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


My mother used to make a stuffed meat loaf and always used milk in the
meat loaf. I saw Emeril Legasse make a meatloaf using milk also. I
would assume that the milk while enriching the meatloaf, blending and
softening the bread crumbs, keeping it moist also holds the meat
together.


I've always used milk. Why not add flavor when adding moisture?
Same with meatballs. I wouldn't be interested in using water.

nancy


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 08:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?

Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


I never put either in my meatloaf, so I can't say?

  #10 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 603
Default milk in meatloaf?

Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott


I've heard of it...I thought it was to keep the meat moist...don't know
why water wouldn't work as well...

--

Real witches don't float so good.
- The Dresden Files
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 09:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default milk in meatloaf?

Scott wrote:

why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?



Soaking the bread in milk makes a better filler. Cut up or tear
up some stale bread, soak it a bit of milk, squeeze the milk out
and use it as miller. I do it with meat loaf and meat balls.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 09:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 552
Default milk in meatloaf?

Dave Smith wrote:


Soaking the bread in milk makes a better filler. Cut up or tear
up some stale bread, soak it a bit of milk, squeeze the milk out
and use it as miller. I do it with meat loaf and meat balls.


how about soaking the milk with store-bought season bread crumbs?
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 09:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
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Posts: 3,524
Default milk in meatloaf?

Scott wrote:
why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?

I've never used milk or water, but judging from the replies some people
think their meatloaf needs added moisture, in which case milk offers
more taste than water. Maybe they use only beef in their loaves, maybe
that's why they need the moisture. I always use beef and pork and
veal, or at least beef and pork, and haven't found a need for added
moisture. I add an egg and just a small bit of bread crumbs to get the
texture I like. Occasionally I will add a bit of canned diced tomatoes
and some of that juice, in which case I probably would add a few more
crumbs. Our meatloaf usually is more for sandwiches than for heating
hot and we like a firm, dense loaf for that. -aem

  #14 (permalink)  
Old 13-12-2006, 09:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,762
Default milk in meatloaf?


"Scott" wrote

Dave Smith wrote:


Soaking the bread in milk makes a better filler. Cut up or tear
up some stale bread, soak it a bit of milk, squeeze the milk out
and use it as miller. I do it with meat loaf and meat balls.


how about soaking the milk with store-bought season bread crumbs?


I use those. I just add the milk to the meatloaf mix, I don't know if
it would be very easy to squeeze out breadcrumbs. I dislike cubes of
bread in my meatloaf or meatballs, that's just me.

nancy


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Old 13-12-2006, 09:50 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 1,367
Default milk in meatloaf?

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Scott" wrote in message
...

why do some meatloaf recipes call for milk?
what's the difference between using milk and water?


Thanks
Scott



Never heard of using either one. Can you provide the whole recipe?



Often times recipes call for soaking dry bread in milk and then
squeezing it dry before adding it to the meat mix, IMO this adds nothing
to the flavour, i have also stopped adding a raw egg to the mix, but
have started adding pureed cabbage to it.

I like to use a good meat stock to the mix to make it fairly soupy,
allowing it to become very well mixed, but this results in a very fine
grained almost pate like meat loaf, which i like but many people prefer
a "chunkier" meat loaf.

I like the fined grained meat loaf so it can be sliced thin for meat
loaf sandwiches.
--
JL
 




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