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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2006, 04:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan

I suppose this might be a little out there, but...

I just got an imagawayaki pan from a yard sale. The previous owner
didn't know how to make it work, and and the instructions (in japanese)
were tossed out a while ago.

What I've done so far is put it on the stove and try to make the treats
that way (for those that don't know, this is a cast iron pan with six
indentations in it, similar to a cupcake pan, but with the indentations
about half as high.)

I've tried cooking these things in the manner I've seen in Little Tokyo
in Los Angeles. Pour in some batter half-way, put in some filling,
flip over onto another half elsewhere on the pan. Didn't work. I keep
mangling the food trying to get it out. I also tried pouring in the
batter all the way and letting it cook, but that was no-go as well
(mangling again). I'm thinking of putting it in the oven for a few
minutes at a time to see if I can get better results that way, but also
wanted to ask for any ideas or advice.

Thanks,
Erik

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2006, 06:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem
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Posts: 3,524
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan


Erik wrote:
I suppose this might be a little out there, but...

I just got an imagawayaki pan from a yard sale. The previous owner
didn't know how to make it work, and and the instructions (in japanese)
were tossed out a while ago.

What I've done so far is put it on the stove and try to make the treats
that way (for those that don't know, this is a cast iron pan with six
indentations in it, similar to a cupcake pan, but with the indentations
about half as high.)


Does it have a hinge that lets it fold in half making a lid?

I've tried cooking these things in the manner I've seen in Little Tokyo
in Los Angeles. Pour in some batter half-way, put in some filling,
flip over onto another half elsewhere on the pan. Didn't work.


The version I've seen has you put in a little batter, then a little
filling, then top it off with more batter. Close the lid. When the
bottom is done you turn it over to finish off the top.

I keep
mangling the food trying to get it out. I also tried pouring in the
batter all the way and letting it cook, but that was no-go as well
(mangling again).


It may not be seasoned well. It should be fairly nonstick. A spray of
oil might help until you get it well seasoned. Since you got it at a
yard sale you may need to scrub it and go through the typical seasoning
process. Crumple up several paper towels to a size suitable for the
cups/indentations and moisten that with oil. Get the pan really hot.
Using tongs, wipe the cups' bottoms and sides with the oiled paper,
return to the heat for a bit. Cool and wipe again. Rinse and dry.
Repeat if necessary.

I'm thinking of putting it in the oven for a few
minutes at a time to see if I can get better results that way, but also
wanted to ask for any ideas or advice.


I think they're designed for a cooktop rather than the oven and I'm
sure there must be some
tricks to getting the cakes out, but I've never used one myself.
-aem

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2006, 07:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 2
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan

aem wrote:
Does it have a hinge that lets it fold in half making a lid?


No, I'm afraid not. It's just the pan.

It may not be seasoned well. It should be fairly nonstick. A spray of
oil might help until you get it well seasoned. Since you got it at a
yard sale you may need to scrub it and go through the typical seasoning
process. Crumple up several paper towels to a size suitable for the
cups/indentations and moisten that with oil. Get the pan really hot.
Using tongs, wipe the cups' bottoms and sides with the oiled paper,
return to the heat for a bit. Cool and wipe again. Rinse and dry.
Repeat if necessary.


I'll give this a shot. After acquiring it, I did put a layer of Crisco
on it and put it in the oven for about an hour (more instructions I
found on the Internet). Maybe I should scrub the whole thing down and
start over.

Thank you for your help,
Erik

  #4 (permalink)  
Old 22-11-2006, 02:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 3,906
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan

Erik wrote:

I suppose this might be a little out there, but...

I just got an imagawayaki pan from a yard sale. The previous owner
didn't know how to make it work, and and the instructions (in japanese)
were tossed out a while ago.

What I've done so far is put it on the stove and try to make the treats
that way (for those that don't know, this is a cast iron pan with six
indentations in it, similar to a cupcake pan, but with the indentations
about half as high.)

I've tried cooking these things in the manner I've seen in Little Tokyo
in Los Angeles. Pour in some batter half-way, put in some filling,
flip over onto another half elsewhere on the pan. Didn't work. I keep
mangling the food trying to get it out. I also tried pouring in the
batter all the way and letting it cook, but that was no-go as well
(mangling again). I'm thinking of putting it in the oven for a few
minutes at a time to see if I can get better results that way, but also
wanted to ask for any ideas or advice.

Thanks,
Erik

Have you seasoned the pan? Cast iron needs to be well seasoned before
using to avoid mangling the food or the food just sticking to it. I'm
sure there are instructions all over the net on seasoning cast iron so
won't go into it here. Hope this helps.

George

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 23-11-2006, 10:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 156
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan


Cast iron is hillbilly ,
it cant transfer heat like aluminum/copper so it cooks
uneven ... So also the stupid thin steel pans at Walmart .


The only serious problem with cooking
is controlling heat to the food .



BTW Cranberrys have benzoic acid , mixed with Vit' C
cause small amts of BENZINE , a deadly poison .
Now they will complain that small amounts dont hurt
you ! Want to "experiment" on yourself !
Why when you can use tastier foods ? Thats what i
call poverty !

People who eat somethin for they had
it as a poor child ..... soggy corn flakes ....
grits ..... cranberrys ......
Stay a poor child , then ...

  #6 (permalink)  
Old 24-11-2006, 01:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,620
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan

Oh pshaw, on Thu 23 Nov 2006 07:37:16p, Ken Davey meant to say...



id=9184296B-D4ED-49A2-A173-AEB0DD18A6CE
"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...
werty wrote:
Cast iron is hillbilly ,
it cant transfer heat like aluminum/copper so it cooks uneven
... So also the stupid thin steel pans at Walmart .


Cast iron is very old, way before Jed Clampett invented hillbillies.

The only serious problem with cooking is controlling heat to the
food .


Never mind that business about balance of ingredients, toxicity,
palatability...

No other problems. I bet werty is a graduate of a culinary school.

No, seriously...

Pastorio

Werty is dumber than Sheldon!


How is that possible? Well, as I think about it, they're both dumber than
dirt.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.

  #7 (permalink)  
Old 24-11-2006, 02:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,025
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan

werty wrote:
Cast iron is hillbilly ,
it cant transfer heat like aluminum/copper so it cooks
uneven ... So also the stupid thin steel pans at Walmart .


Cast iron is very old, way before Jed Clampett invented
hillbillies.

The only serious problem with cooking
is controlling heat to the food .


Never mind that business about balance of ingredients,
toxicity, palatability...

No other problems. I bet werty is a graduate of a culinary
school.

No, seriously...

Pastorio
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 24-11-2006, 02:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 138
Default Imagawayaki - Cooking via cast iron pan



id=9184296B-D4ED-49A2-A173-AEB0DD18A6CE
"Bob (this one)" wrote in message
...
werty wrote:
Cast iron is hillbilly ,
it cant transfer heat like aluminum/copper so it cooks
uneven ... So also the stupid thin steel pans at Walmart .


Cast iron is very old, way before Jed Clampett invented hillbillies.

The only serious problem with cooking
is controlling heat to the food .


Never mind that business about balance of ingredients, toxicity,
palatability...

No other problems. I bet werty is a graduate of a culinary school.

No, seriously...

Pastorio

Werty is dumber than Sheldon!
--
Regards.
Ken.

Please join my team in the fight against cancer.
http://www.grid.org/services/teams/team.htm?


  #9 (permalink)  
Old 14-04-2010, 09:43 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: perth, australia
Posts: 1
Default

Erik, I was just in Singapore and noticed that that heat the griddle on a flat grill.

Do you know where I can purchase one of the griddles?

All the best.

Mr Bean
 




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