A Food and drink forum. FoodBanter.com

Welcome to FoodBanter.com forums which provide access to the finest food and drink related newsgroups.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most newsgroup discussions and access our other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics to the food related newsgroups, communicate privately with other FoodBanter.com members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact support.

Go Back   Home » FoodBanter.com forum » Food and Cooking » General Cooking
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Keeping chocolate shiny - brown



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2006, 06:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown

I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .

TIA
JaKe
Seattle

Ads
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2006, 07:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 246
Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown


wrote:
denise~* wrote:
wrote:
I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .

TIA
JaKe
Seattle


I just actually looked this up for donuts, although not sure how well
it dries for biscotti. might be soft set

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/satiny-...ze/detail.aspx

you could probably nuke the chips...if you are careful.


I did nuke the chips. Someone else said corn syrup could help as well
- anyone?

JaKe


I meant nuke instead of using a double boiler, per the recipe I posted.

  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2006, 07:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,762
Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown


wrote

I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .


For some reason I thought keeping it shiny was
why you were supposed to temper chocolate. Look
for that, I think it's your answer.

nancy


  #11 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2006, 08:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 510
Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown

wrote:
I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .


If you add cream you will be making a ganache (not 100% sure of that
spelling), which is fine, but if you just want a chocolate coating
then you have to either stop breaking the temper on your chocolate
or retemper it after melting.

If you melt the chocolate slowly (like 10 second bursts) in
the microwave and stir a lot between heating, you can melt it
without breaking temper. It's a pretty narrow temperature
range, but it can be done. You want to stay under 90F degrees.
You should have melt around 85F. Depending on the exact
chocolate you are using temper will break somewhere around
92F to 95F.

Making a ganache is OK, too. You control the hardness of
the set there by changing the ratio of chocolate to cream.
More cream means softer, less cream means firmer, but it
will never have that tempered chocolate snap.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
recipes with buttermilk? enigma General Cooking 17 12-08-2005 12:58 AM
Chocolate Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) The Chocolate Archives Chocolate 0 17-04-2004 12:27 PM
Chocolate Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) The Chocolate Archives General Cooking 0 17-04-2004 12:27 PM
Chocolate Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) The Chocolate Archives Chocolate 0 15-12-2003 10:48 AM
rich, moist chocolate cake Elitsirk Baking 25 07-12-2003 01:49 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.2.0
Copyright 2004-2014 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.