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Smooth top ranges vs coil



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 03:53 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

I'm agitating about replacing my stove - a 22-year-old GE electric. I'm
considering one of these two GE electric slide-ins:
http://tinyurl.com/m8459 (I hope that link works)
The smooth top is appealing, partly because of ease in wiping spills,
cleaning and partly because it's the newer thing. I have big concerns
about it, though, because I do home canning. I spoke with the GE rep
who happened to be in the appliance store yesterday and he assures me
that I should have no problems assuming my canning kettle has a flat
bottom (they do) and that I wouldn't be using the burner for 4-5 hours
at stretch (something about that tricking the sensors or something into
thinking it was overheating and would, thus, shut off). That's not an
issue. He didn't seem concerned about the weight of the kettles.
What I want more than anything is to borrow someone's range for a couple
hours and put up a batch of jam and see how it goes. :-/ That's not
likely.

My questions: Do any of you who currently have smooth-top ranges wish
you had a coil burner range?

Have you ever canned using one?

Anything you hate about it?

The good news is that I'm in no burning hurry for this replacement.

Thanks for any insights.
-Barb Schaller
--
-Barb
www.jamlady.eboard.com Updated 2-28-2006, Crazy Lady Party;
Church review #7
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 04:58 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Posts: 935
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
I'm agitating about replacing my stove - a 22-year-old GE electric. I'm
considering one of these two GE electric slide-ins:
http://tinyurl.com/m8459 (I hope that link works)
The smooth top is appealing, partly because of ease in wiping spills,
cleaning and partly because it's the newer thing. I have big concerns
about it, though, because I do home canning. I spoke with the GE rep
who happened to be in the appliance store yesterday and he assures me
that I should have no problems assuming my canning kettle has a flat
bottom (they do) and that I wouldn't be using the burner for 4-5 hours
at stretch (something about that tricking the sensors or something into
thinking it was overheating and would, thus, shut off). That's not an
issue. He didn't seem concerned about the weight of the kettles.
What I want more than anything is to borrow someone's range for a couple
hours and put up a batch of jam and see how it goes. :-/ That's not
likely.

My questions: Do any of you who currently have smooth-top ranges wish
you had a coil burner range?

Have you ever canned using one?



Hi Barb! Long time!

I don't have a slide in but rather a GE Profile freestanding
30" range. I've used gas, coils, and this glass flattop. My
av? The glass flattop. The model I have has two burners on
the right, two burners on the left with what they call a
bridge burner which turns the whole left side into one large
burner from the front to the back of the unit. It also has
a small "warming" burner in the center. Cleanup is a breeze.

As for the weight? Don't worry about it. I had some huge
pots on mine, full and no problem. I use metal, glass, cast
iron, they all work fine as long as the bottoms are mainly
flat. The still work with small indentations in the bottom
but probably not quite as efficient.

Would I go back to gas? No. Coil? No.

I've never done canning or jam but if you get up the
Poughkeepsie, NY way you're welcome to experiment on mine.

--
Steve
No piece of paper can be folded in half more than 7 times.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 06:15 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

On Thu 02 Mar 2006 09:58:50a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve
Calvin?

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
I'm agitating about replacing my stove - a 22-year-old GE electric. I'm
considering one of these two GE electric slide-ins:
http://tinyurl.com/m8459 (I hope that link works)
The smooth top is appealing, partly because of ease in wiping spills,
cleaning and partly because it's the newer thing. I have big concerns
about it, though, because I do home canning. I spoke with the GE rep
who happened to be in the appliance store yesterday and he assures me
that I should have no problems assuming my canning kettle has a flat
bottom (they do) and that I wouldn't be using the burner for 4-5 hours
at stretch (something about that tricking the sensors or something into
thinking it was overheating and would, thus, shut off). That's not an
issue. He didn't seem concerned about the weight of the kettles.
What I want more than anything is to borrow someone's range for a couple
hours and put up a batch of jam and see how it goes. :-/ That's not
likely.

My questions: Do any of you who currently have smooth-top ranges wish
you had a coil burner range?

Have you ever canned using one?



Hi Barb! Long time!

I don't have a slide in but rather a GE Profile freestanding
30" range. I've used gas, coils, and this glass flattop. My
av? The glass flattop. The model I have has two burners on
the right, two burners on the left with what they call a
bridge burner which turns the whole left side into one large
burner from the front to the back of the unit. It also has
a small "warming" burner in the center. Cleanup is a breeze.

As for the weight? Don't worry about it. I had some huge
pots on mine, full and no problem. I use metal, glass, cast
iron, they all work fine as long as the bottoms are mainly
flat. The still work with small indentations in the bottom
but probably not quite as efficient.

Would I go back to gas? No. Coil? No.

I've never done canning or jam but if you get up the
Poughkeepsie, NY way you're welcome to experiment on mine.


I totally agree with Steve, Barb, and although I currently have a coil top
in this rental house, I can't wait to get back to the glass smoothtop.

In different houses I've had 3 smoothtop ranges. I never used a pressure
canner on any of them, but I uses a large BWB kettle many times. No
problem.

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 07:50 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

Melba's Jammin' wrote:

I'm agitating about replacing my stove - a 22-year-old GE electric. I'm
considering one of these two GE electric slide-ins:
http://tinyurl.com/m8459 (I hope that link works)
The smooth top is appealing, partly because of ease in wiping spills,
cleaning and partly because it's the newer thing. I have big concerns
about it, though, because I do home canning. I spoke with the GE rep
who happened to be in the appliance store yesterday and he assures me
that I should have no problems assuming my canning kettle has a flat
bottom (they do) and that I wouldn't be using the burner for 4-5 hours
at stretch (something about that tricking the sensors or something into
thinking it was overheating and would, thus, shut off). That's not an
issue. He didn't seem concerned about the weight of the kettles.
What I want more than anything is to borrow someone's range for a couple
hours and put up a batch of jam and see how it goes. :-/ That's not
likely.

My questions: Do any of you who currently have smooth-top ranges wish
you had a coil burner range?

Have you ever canned using one?

Anything you hate about it?

The good news is that I'm in no burning hurry for this replacement.

Thanks for any insights.
-Barb Schaller

Barb,

I don't know about the specific model you have in mind, but
a friend and I had *big* plans about doing some canning in
her newly remodeled kitchen ($20K pricetag!). She got a
smooth top stove as part of the upgrade.

Luckily we did a "dry run" before my garden started putting
out, because neither of my BWB canners (pint and quart sizes)
or my 22qt pressure canner would work on her beautiful new
stovetop.

I've still got a coil burner style, so I'm still in business
when the garden starts up again, but it would have been
so much nicer with her extra counter space to do the work
in her kitchen.

Bottom line, when upgrade time comes, I'll stick to the coils.

HTH

Nyssa, who bought her seed potatoes and onion sets yesterday
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 08:37 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

In article ,
Nyssa wrote:
(snipped)
Luckily we did a "dry run" before my garden started putting
out, because neither of my BWB canners (pint and quart sizes)
or my 22qt pressure canner would work on her beautiful new
stovetop.

I've still got a coil burner style, so I'm still in business
when the garden starts up again, but it would have been
so much nicer with her extra counter space to do the work
in her kitchen.

Bottom line, when upgrade time comes, I'll stick to the coils.


Thanks.
--
-Barb
www.jamlady.eboard.com Updated 2-28-2006, Crazy Lady Party;
Church review #7
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 08:42 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

In article ,
Steve Calvin wrote:

Melba's Jammin' wrote:


thinking it was overheating and would, thus, shut off). That's not an
issue. He didn't seem concerned about the weight of the kettles.
What I want more than anything is to borrow someone's range for a couple
hours and put up a batch of jam and see how it goes. :-/ That's not
likely.

My questions: Do any of you who currently have smooth-top ranges wish
you had a coil burner range?

Have you ever canned using one?


Hi Barb! Long time!


Indeed. I don't stop here much.

I don't have a slide in but rather a GE Profile freestanding
30" range. I've used gas, coils, and this glass flattop. My
av? The glass flattop. The model I have has two burners on
the right, two burners on the left with what they call a
bridge burner which turns the whole left side into one large
burner from the front to the back of the unit. It also has
a small "warming" burner in the center. Cleanup is a breeze.

As for the weight? Don't worry about it. I had some huge
pots on mine, full and no problem. I use metal, glass, cast
iron, they all work fine as long as the bottoms are mainly
flat. The still work with small indentations in the bottom
but probably not quite as efficient.

Would I go back to gas? No. Coil? No.

I've never done canning or jam but if you get up the
Poughkeepsie, NY way you're welcome to experiment on mine.


Damn! I've got an offer in to the manager of the appliance store where
I expect to buy. She's got a smooth top and my offer includes the whole
friggin' batch of strawberry jam for her if she'll let me try to make it
on her unit. I haven't heard back from her so I'm not holding my
breath. Dangitall. Glad to hear about the weight stuff, Steve.

I'm aware of the bridge burner thang and the warming unit. Can't see a
need for myself, but clearly mileage varies. I told my sales guy that
what I'd LIKE is a three burner stove! Two big ones and a small one.
Right now I've got a dead small burner in the back and I absolutely have
not missed it in the last year or so since it's been gone. :-)
-Barb
--
-Barb
www.jamlady.eboard.com Updated 2-28-2006, Crazy Lady Party;
Church review #7
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 08:43 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,583
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

In article 9,
Wayne Boatwright wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com wrote:

On Thu 02 Mar 2006 09:58:50a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve
Calvin?

(snippage)

Would I go back to gas? No. Coil? No.


I totally agree with Steve, Barb, and although I currently have a coil top
in this rental house, I can't wait to get back to the glass smoothtop.

In different houses I've had 3 smoothtop ranges. I never used a pressure
canner on any of them, but I uses a large BWB kettle many times. No
problem.


Thanks, Wayne.
--
-Barb
www.jamlady.eboard.com Updated 2-28-2006, Crazy Lady Party;
Church review #7
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 08:58 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 935
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

Nyssa wrote:

I don't know about the specific model you have in mind, but
a friend and I had *big* plans about doing some canning in
her newly remodeled kitchen ($20K pricetag!). She got a
smooth top stove as part of the upgrade.

Luckily we did a "dry run" before my garden started putting
out, because neither of my BWB canners (pint and quart sizes)
or my 22qt pressure canner would work on her beautiful new
stovetop.


You give no specifics. If it's a flat bottom pressure cooker
I can't imagine why it wouldn't work. Heat is heat, no
matter what source it comes from. The only reason I can see
that it wouldn't work is that the bottom had some serious
shape differentials which caused extremely poor heat
transfer. But that's a known condition of flat tops.

Mine *cranks* out heat. I defy any flat bottom unit to not
severely boil on high.


--
Steve
No piece of paper can be folded in half more than 7 times.
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 09:01 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 935
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

Melba's Jammin' wrote:



Damn! I've got an offer in to the manager of the appliance store where
I expect to buy. She's got a smooth top and my offer includes the whole
friggin' batch of strawberry jam for her if she'll let me try to make it
on her unit. I haven't heard back from her so I'm not holding my
breath. Dangitall. Glad to hear about the weight stuff, Steve.

I'm aware of the bridge burner thang and the warming unit. Can't see a
need for myself, but clearly mileage varies. I told my sales guy that
what I'd LIKE is a three burner stove! Two big ones and a small one.
Right now I've got a dead small burner in the back and I absolutely have
not missed it in the last year or so since it's been gone. :-)
-Barb


The bridge burner and warmer is one of those YMMV kind of
things. Only time I've used the bridge was when we had
company and I wanted the griddle for breakfast.

The warmer? I use that for drum roll please keepin' stuff
warm. Like softly finishing rice, keeping mashed
potatoes until the roast is finished, gravies, etc...
Again though, that's proabably a personal thing and that's
why they make all kinds of stuff, right?

Good luck with the manager! I'd be absolutely amazed if
your cookware wouldn't work on a decent flat top.

--
Steve
No piece of paper can be folded in half more than 7 times.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 09:08 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

On Thu 02 Mar 2006 01:58:01p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve
Calvin?

Nyssa wrote:

I don't know about the specific model you have in mind, but
a friend and I had *big* plans about doing some canning in
her newly remodeled kitchen ($20K pricetag!). She got a
smooth top stove as part of the upgrade.

Luckily we did a "dry run" before my garden started putting
out, because neither of my BWB canners (pint and quart sizes)
or my 22qt pressure canner would work on her beautiful new stovetop.


You give no specifics. If it's a flat bottom pressure cooker
I can't imagine why it wouldn't work. Heat is heat, no
matter what source it comes from. The only reason I can see
that it wouldn't work is that the bottom had some serious
shape differentials which caused extremely poor heat
transfer. But that's a known condition of flat tops.

Mine *cranks* out heat. I defy any flat bottom unit to not
severely boil on high.


Steve, some smoothtop ranges have a hi-limit circuit that turns the element
off (causing it to recycle when it cools) if it overheats. On some of
those cooktops, using an oversize pot, such as a 22 qt pot, will cause the
symptoms of overheating. Usually, such ranges explain that in the user
manual.



--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 09:20 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 935
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Steve, some smoothtop ranges have a hi-limit circuit that turns the element
off (causing it to recycle when it cools) if it overheats. On some of
those cooktops, using an oversize pot, such as a 22 qt pot, will cause the
symptoms of overheating. Usually, such ranges explain that in the user
manual.


Goog point Wayne.
But, (you knew that was comin' didnja? ;-) )

I have a *huge* aluminum pot that I use for live lobsters.
I'm not exactly sure of the size but I'd guess that it's at
least 22qt. I can cook 4, 2 pound lobsters in it with no
problem. I use it on the glass top and have no issues at all.

Not saying that I don't believe you or anything but I've
personally never seen anything that it won't handle. Maybe I
just am not doin' what causes the problem.


--
Steve
No piece of paper can be folded in half more than 7 times.
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 09:34 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 261
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

"Steve Calvin" wrote in message
...
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Steve, some smoothtop ranges have a hi-limit circuit that turns the
element off (causing it to recycle when it cools) if it overheats. On
some of those cooktops, using an oversize pot, such as a 22 qt pot, will
cause the symptoms of overheating. Usually, such ranges explain that in
the user manual.


Goog point Wayne.
But, (you knew that was comin' didnja? ;-) )

I have a *huge* aluminum pot that I use for live lobsters. I'm not exactly
sure of the size but I'd guess that it's at least 22qt. I can cook 4, 2
pound lobsters in it with no problem. I use it on the glass top and have
no issues at all.

Not saying that I don't believe you or anything but I've personally never
seen anything that it won't handle. Maybe I just am not doin' what causes
the problem.


The overheating tends to happen with too small a pot (smaller than the
element) and/or a pot that does not have a reasonably flat bottom. The
reason is that the heat is not conducted away from the element so it
overheats.


--
Peter Aitken


  #13 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 10:12 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 510
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

Steve Calvin wrote:
Nyssa wrote:

I don't know about the specific model you have in mind, but
a friend and I had *big* plans about doing some canning in
her newly remodeled kitchen ($20K pricetag!). She got a
smooth top stove as part of the upgrade.

Luckily we did a "dry run" before my garden started putting
out, because neither of my BWB canners (pint and quart sizes)
or my 22qt pressure canner would work on her beautiful new
stovetop.


You give no specifics. If it's a flat bottom pressure cooker
I can't imagine why it wouldn't work. Heat is heat, no
matter what source it comes from. The only reason I can see


If it's a real high dollar kitchen (though $20K seems too little)
she might have an induction cooktop which would not work with
aluminum pots. Otherwise, I don't know what the problem might
be either. My wife has used our glass smoothtop with big
pressure canner and BWB canner lots and lots. She used to
can and sell jams at the farmer's market. She has since moved
out of our home kitchen and switched to chocolate and toffee
making, but when we set up her commercial kitchen we put two
glass smoothtops into a stainless steel prep table. No trouble
using big pots on them. She spills lots of sugary stuff
on them as well, and we've had no trouble, though I'll admit
there is a little etching on one burner of our home cooktop.
Quick cleanup of spills seems to aleviate that as I've seen
no evidence of etching on the two in her new kitchen.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 10:24 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,620
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

On Thu 02 Mar 2006 02:20:03p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Steve
Calvin?

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Steve, some smoothtop ranges have a hi-limit circuit that turns the
element off (causing it to recycle when it cools) if it overheats. On
some of those cooktops, using an oversize pot, such as a 22 qt pot,
will cause the symptoms of overheating. Usually, such ranges explain
that in the user manual.


Goog point Wayne.
But, (you knew that was comin' didnja? ;-) )

I have a *huge* aluminum pot that I use for live lobsters.
I'm not exactly sure of the size but I'd guess that it's at
least 22qt. I can cook 4, 2 pound lobsters in it with no
problem. I use it on the glass top and have no issues at all.

Not saying that I don't believe you or anything but I've
personally never seen anything that it won't handle. Maybe I
just am not doin' what causes the problem.


As I said, it depends on the brand. The two brands I have owned, GE and
Frigidaire, have no problem with big pots. When I was researching before
my last purchase, I did find a couple of brands which warned against using
them. Needless to say, I dismissed them. Sorry, but I don't recall the
brands, so I cannot document that for you.

--
Wayne Boatwright ożo
____________________

BIOYA
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 02-03-2006, 10:27 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,242
Default Smooth top ranges vs coil

On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 09:53:14 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
wrote:

I'm agitating about replacing my stove - a 22-year-old GE electric. I'm
considering one of these two GE electric slide-ins:
http://tinyurl.com/m8459 (I hope that link works)
The smooth top is appealing, partly because of ease in wiping spills,
cleaning and partly because it's the newer thing. I have big concerns
about it, though, because I do home canning. I spoke with the GE rep
who happened to be in the appliance store yesterday and he assures me
that I should have no problems assuming my canning kettle has a flat
bottom (they do) and that I wouldn't be using the burner for 4-5 hours
at stretch (something about that tricking the sensors or something into
thinking it was overheating and would, thus, shut off). That's not an
issue. He didn't seem concerned about the weight of the kettles.
What I want more than anything is to borrow someone's range for a couple
hours and put up a batch of jam and see how it goes. :-/ That's not
likely.

My questions: Do any of you who currently have smooth-top ranges wish
you had a coil burner range?

Have you ever canned using one?

Anything you hate about it?

The good news is that I'm in no burning hurry for this replacement.

Thanks for any insights.
-Barb Schaller


You can download the users manual and see exactly what it says about
it. I am lusting for a smooth top, but as long as this one works I
doubt I will be seeing one.
http://www.geappliances.com/service_...rt/literature/

I found this site when we moved in and there was no manual for the
stove.


--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974
 




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